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Knockmealdown Mountains Area
Place count in area: 17, OSI/LPS Maps: 74, 82 
Highest place:
Knockmealdown, 792.4m
Maximum height for area: 792.4 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 682.7 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Knockmealdown Mountain Cnoc Mhaoldomhnaigh A name in Irish
(Ir. Cnoc Mhaoldomhnaigh [OSI], 'hill of Maoldomhnach') County Highpoint of Waterford, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Medium grained pink-purple sandstone Bedrock

Height: 792.4m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 74 Grid Reference: S05797 08410
Place visited by 577 members. Recently by: cclair, Chance, Podgemus, patsykennedy, jcincork, JimMc, grahambartlett, Irishsas, NualaMc, jgdarcy, reespdr, Mike32chp, Deise-Man, conorjob, PaulNolan
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Longitude: -7.915891, Latitude: 52.227902 , Easting: 205798, Northing: 108411 Prominence: 682.74m,  Isolation: 0.9km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 605745 608465,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Knckml, 10 char: Knckmldwn
Bedrock type: Medium grained pink-purple sandstone, (Knockmealdown Sandstone Formation)

Knockmealdown gives its name to the range as a whole, but the earlier name for these hills, along with the lower hill country to the east, is Sliabh gCua. There is a traditional air entitled Sliabh Geal gCua na Féile, meaning 'bright Sliabh gCua of the festival'. The name Maoldomhnach means ‘devotee of the church’. The surnames derived from this are Ó Maoldomhnaigh (anglicised Muldowney) and its variant Ó Maoldhomhnaigh (anglicised Moloney). Moloney is still a common surname in the vicinity. Some sources translate the name as Cnoc Maol Donn, 'bare round hill', but this is a poor attempt to interpret the name only on the basis of the modern anglicised form. The form Knockmealdowny, recorded in the Civil Survey in 1654, shows that was clearly an additional syllable.   Knockmealdown is the highest mountain in the Knockmealdown Mountains area and the 47th highest in Ireland. Knockmealdown is the second highest point in county Waterford.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/?PHPSESSID=biua51306mo57gmff1urqmvd96
COMMENTS for Knockmealdown 1 2 3 .. 6 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockmealdown in area Knockmealdown Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Summit trig looking north west to the Sugarloaf, Galtys in the distance
 
A tough ascent from all sides
Short Summary created by CaptainVertigo, jackill,  16 Oct 2014
The most travelled routes to this summit are from the direction of the Sugarloaf.
Starting at the Vee, where there is lots of room to park safely by the roadside, and heading up the rough, often boggy track past the Grubb monument (large stone cairn by the roadside), join the stone wall just after the Sugarloaf summit cairn and follow the wall to Knockmealdown.
You can also park in Bay lough carpark S031 101 A(watch out for the Ghost of Pettycoat Loose!), cross the main road and follow the steep rocky track, keeping the stone wall to your left to the top of the Sugarloaf, turn east then to follow the wall on to Knockmealdown.
You can make the ascent somewhat easier by parking at the Vee, walk to the sharp apex of the Vee itself and follow the Munster way( signposted as St Declans way here) down into Glenmoylan. Do not cross the stream instead follow the path to the right going up the glen almost as far as where the non-existant Lough Moylan is shown on the OS maps , look for a rocky zig-zag path going up to the col between the Sugarloaf and Knockmealdown and follow it up. Cross the col to find the wall as mentioned and follow it east to Knockmealdown. A longer walk can be had by starting at S112 083 B on the road between Mellary and Newcastle. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/comment/4805/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockmealdown in area Knockmealdown Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Dillon on Knockmealdown
for gribboneer-of-the-year
by paddyobpc  23 Jan 2017
In December of 2016 while earning points for gribboneer-of-the-year http://www.highpointireland.com/gribboneer-of-the-year.html we returned to Knockmealdown on two occasions. The first was on Saturday 17 December just after 3pm when we set off from a point on the R668 near a monument to a plane crash. This is just after you leave County Tipperary and enter County Waterford as you travel towards Lismore. This was to avoid climbing Sugar Loaf Hill, as our goal was to get to Knockmealdown trig to earn the 12 points. Dillon (dillonkdy) found the going tough enough on this route as the heather was quite high with no clear path and he had already climbed Galtymore that morning. After about a mile and 300m of climbing we met the more common route at the Waterford/Tipperary border wall where we would normally just come off Sugar Loaf Hill and start the climb again for Knockmealdown. We turned right here and followed the county boundary wall. After reaching the trig and taking the necessary picture we returned almost by the same route as we came. Overall this route while shorter with less climbing definitely does take a bit of extra care and work with the heather, lack of clear path etc.
We returned again on 28 December, this time an 8am start. We parked at a bridge on the R668 at a junction for Cappoquin (R669) and Lismore about a mile on the Lismore side of Baylough car park, well described by Paul O’Connor here http://www.walkingandhikingireland.com/the-county-tops-number-5-knockmealdown-county-waterford/. The idea was that this would be the shortest distance to the trig but we expected a tough enough climb as a result. We found it easy enough at the start but soon enough the steepness of the challenge was evident. Compared to our last route the vegetation was not an issue as it had been burned probably in the previous year. Ferns may be an issue at other times of the year though. Again there was no distinct path but we didn’t mind that on this occasion and we followed our straight line route to the trig. We walked about 4.5KM up and back rising about 500m over about 1.5hrs.
For more pictures and details check out Dillon’s website at https://dillons32chpchallenge.github.io/progress/index.html Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/comment/18806/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockmealdown in area Knockmealdown Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Jeep on Knocklealdown
 
Jeeps on the hills
by deswalk  17 Jun 2010
On my approach to the summit of Knockmealdown last Monday, 14 June, I was horrified to see a Jeep type car just getting to the trig point ahead of me. I waited for ten minutes in the heather until it departed before moving up to the top.

I've been climbing these hills since the 1970's and apart from a bulldozer doing some work about thirty years ago this is the first time I've seen a vehicle on the top.

Should I have been outraged or angry? Perhaps some would say that the hills should be available to those of all persuasions. I have observed a massive increase in erosion since I first climbed the hill all those years ago.

Incidentally, I watched the car retracing its path and it appeared to be travelling towards the easier slopes adjacent to Sugarloaf Hill.

The photo shows the offending vehicle but taken from a distance on my phone so may not be very clear. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/comment/5881/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockmealdown in area Knockmealdown Mountains, Ireland
simon3 on Knockmealdown, 2003
by simon3  17 May 2003
Knockmealdown boasts two interpretations of the Irish origins of its name, either Cnoc Mhaoldomhnaigh Muldowneys' Hill or Cnoc Maol Donn bald brown hill. Leaving aside such literary argument, it is the tallest mountain in Waterford.

Our view from beside the trig pillar is towards the north west. Just left of centre on the skyline is Sugarloaf Hill, while nearer and at the right is the ridge leading to Knockmoylan (768m and unnamed on the OS).

Reputedly, buried at the summit in a place he himself chose is Mr. Henry Eeles, an author, with his dog and gun. We didn’t see any signs of interment on our visit. However, as you can see, there might well be a funeral if anyone ventured over the steep NE facing side of Knockmealdown. There is a drop of over 300m to two tiny lakes at about 480m Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/comment/498/
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Another county top!
by paulocon  28 Sep 2011
1st top of a short horseshoe walk on the Knockmealdowns on 14/09/2011. Started at the Glennandaree Bridge from which the going is relatively easy. Some heather needs to be encountered on the lower stretches of the mountain but this gives way as you gain height to rockier ground. The summit is marked by a trig pillar from which the ground to the North falls dramatically so care is needed in low visibility. Superb views encompassing the Knockmealdown Range as well as the Comeraghs, Galtees and solitary Slievenamon. Further away is the South coast and the Celtic Sea. A handy walk to gain the top of Waterford. Continued onto Knockmoylan and then Sugarloaf Hill. Done a write-up of the walk at: http://climbingirelandsmountains.blogspot.com/2011/09/evening-in-knocmealdowns.html Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/comment/6541/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockmealdown in area Knockmealdown Mountains, Ireland
 
simon3 on Knockmealdown, 2003
by simon3  17 May 2003
Robert Lloyd Praeger [The Way That I Went 1969] wasn’t wholly impressed by the Knockmealdowns. He said “.. forms a fine upstanding row of peaks, rising to 2609 feet: but this is merely clever window dressing. There is nothing except this single row of summits – no lakes or corries or deep glens or cliffs; very little bare rock: and so, while they furnish fine walking, the zoologist or botanist will find these hills somewhat monotonous.” We can certainly agree about the walking which gives great views and a succession of relatively unfrequented hills.

This view of Knockmealdown was taken one fine day in February en-route to Knockmoylan. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/45/comment/499/
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