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Knockboy Mountain An Cnoc Buí A name in Irish
(Ir. An Cnoc Buí [OSI], 'yellow/golden hill') County Highpoint of Cork, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Purple & green sandstone & siltstone Bedrock

Height: 706m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 85 Grid Reference: W00480 62060 This summit has been logged as climbed by 218 members. Recently by: Franky, IainT, Lauranna, amgall, AdrianneB, declanohagan, corkrats, fmacm, Aidy, johnballinger, ericjones, lw24, tomodub, dillonkdy, paddyobpc
I have climbed this summit: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.443414, Latitude: 51.802466 , Easting: 100480, Northing: 62060 Prominence: 685m,   Isolation: 0.6km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 500453 562118,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Knckby, 10 char: Knockboy
Bedrock type: Purple & green sandstone & siltstone, (Caha Mountain Formation)

Knockboy is the highest point in Co. Cork, although its summit is shared with Co. Kerry. It is less spectacular than some of the hills further west, such as Hungry Hill. It is perhaps a surprise that Cork's highest point is lower than Mount Leinster on the boundary between Carlow and Wexford, two counties which are hardly known for their mountains. All of this goes to show that ruggedness and height do not always go hand in hand.   Knockboy is the highest mountain in the Shehy/Knockboy area and the 106th highest in Ireland. Knockboy is the highest point in county Cork.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockboy in area Shehy/Knockboy, Ireland
Picture: From Lough Boy
The Top of Cork
Short Summary created by Colin Murphy, jackill,  17 May 2016
Park at V98530 61072 A , a gravel area next to a commemorative stone for "The Priests Leap" room for 2 cars. There are options for parking also before and after this. Cross the first of many sheepwire fences and make your way to the shores of Lough Boy, here pick up another fence to the north of the lake and follow it to the summit trig and small cairn. views of the Shehys to the east, the 'Reeks to the north and the Cahas to the west.

Here's a video short summary (1:17 long):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1mNEgb-Pog&feature=youtu.be Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/4864/
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockboy in area Shehy/Knockboy, Ireland
Picture: Gully above Lough Akinkeen
One of Munster's Monsters
by kernowclimber  11 Oct 2013
After our sortie on Hungry Hill using Lynch’s ‘Munster’s Mountains’ back in May we might have expected another challenge in the wilds of West Cork! We resolved to tackle Cork’s highest mountain via a gully from Lough Akinkeen described in Lynch’s book. There is room for only one car at IW 02229 65760 B by a gateway onto a forestry track where I was bitten alive by clouds of horseflies and midges before I’d even had time to don the DEET! The recently surfaced track leads steeply upwards to the pine fringed lough situated at 300 metres. Close to the tree line it splits; one branch leads straight through the trees toward the shore, the other trends right running around the SW shore to bring the climber close to the steep cliffs of Lough Akinkeen. There are several near vertical gullies etched deeply into the cliff face. The one we chose is above a fence, contains a small stream and is to the right of a long unclimbable gully that shoots leftwards toward the highest point of the cliffs. Leave the path and cross the fence below the gully. Climb about 100 metres up through long grass and heather to reach the bottom of the gully.

The 200m gully, described separately, was wet, much vegetated and the rock was green with slime and greasy to climb. Near the top, the views of Lough Akinkeen, Knockantooreen and Carran were inspiring until cloud suddenly descended. An eerie silence ensued as wafts of mist enveloped us in a ghostly embrace. As we trudged uphill through the heather towards the cairn on Caoinkeen the wind picked up and visibility was poor. The ground is very boggy hereabouts and I had my first experience of planting my feet on what I thought to be terra firma only to find myself sinking rapidly into shin deep bog and unable to extricate myself. Fortunately mcrtchly was on hand to haul me out of the mire that very reluctantly released me with a disgusting sucking sound. Suitably soiled we continued S-SW past the trig point towards Knockboy some 2.5km distant. The wind was now driving droplets of rain that landed on our Gore-Tex jackets and hats with a constant strident hiss. Passing Lough Nambrackdarig over hummocky terrain interspersed with rock, heather and thick carpets of bog, the rectangular silhouette of the trig point at Knockboy finally appeared through the gloom.

We did not tarry long at Cork’s highest point returning towards Caoinkeen but turning NNW to contour round and gain the W ridge of Akinkeen on steep ground near a fence. At about IW 00596 64944 C (the 550m contour line) another fence branched off to the right and we followed this NE down the ridge until the 430 contour line at IW 01027 65440 D, then battled our way through slippery long wet grass to gain the track by the lake. Six hours and 12km later we arrived at our car, leaking wet and absolutely filthy, having completed another of Lynch’s ‘Munster’s Mountains’ which we have now renamed ‘Munster’s Monsters’!! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/5985/
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Don't be put off by the drive!
by paulocon  27 Sep 2011
For the second time in two days, my visit to a summit had been accompanied by thick cloud cover. Starting from Priest's Leap and after very heavy rain the previous night and during the morning, the going up Knockboy was a very heavy slog. What I guess are normally gentle trickles down the mountain had turned into raging, roaring torrents. By the time I was half-way to Lough Boy, all visibility was gone, the rain was coming down heavy and the mountain sheep seemed to be discussing why yet another idiot was trying to make his way to the top of Cork in such conditions.

I struggled on (cheating with my GPS) and was very glad to see the trig pillar and the sorry-looking cairn that marks the top of the largest county in Ireland. The lack of views was somewhat made up for by the fact that I now had reached 21 county-tops. Typically, the cloud decided to move off as I made my way back to my starting point giving a hint of the views available from higher up the mountain.

For the record, the drive up Priest's Leap isn't at all bad when you approach from the Kenmare side. The biggest challenge were the torrents of water coming down the road in a couple of places after the early deluge. While only wide enough to take 1 car in most places and with grass growing in the middle of parts of it, the road has plenty of places to pull in/reverse to should you meet another car. I take it the Cork side offers a more severe driving challenge.

I have put some more info including a GPS trace at http://climbingirelandsmountains.blogspot.com/2011/09/taking-leap-to-top-of-cork.html Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/6472/
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sparow on Knockboy, 2005
by sparow  23 Feb 2005
You can drive up to the top of priests leap in a car - not a bus (simplifies the traverse to Ahinkeen). It makes for a short walk to the summit, ideal for winter or if you start out late. But, do not drive up if you like your car or don't like reversing. It's unprotected and passing spots are few - I had to reverse up the hill 300M to let a car through. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/1492/
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aidand on Knockboy, 2008
by aidand  15 Apr 2008
There are ongoing access problems on Knockboy. Please talk to the locals before attempting to climb Knockboy, or contact the Kenmare Walking Club. I understand that some of the members of this club are trying to resolve the problem. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/3043/
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SDillmore on Knockboy, 2005
by SDillmore  17 Mar 2005
Not much to add. Took a St. Patrick's day trip up Priest's Leap. The warm weather didn't follow me up the mountain. If you look at the OSI map, you will see where the Priest's Leap road goes from yellow to black. I didn't notice much of a change, but sparow was right, oncoming traffic would be a pain. Visibility was about 20 meters, and it had been raining, so very boggy walk to the summit. Easy to get lost, so make sure you have a map and compass. Basically, I just followed the road north from the priests leap for about 600m, followed the stream up to Lough Reagh, then made a beeline for Knockboy summit. Quite the stiff wind up there, and it was much colder than I expected.
I imagine the walk would be pretty in nice weather. The drive up Priest's Leap maybe not so much if you are vertiginous.
Be prepared to climb a few fences, especially if visibility is bad and you have to follow a bearing. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/1538/
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(End of comment section for Knockboy.)

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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here