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Faughil 241m,
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Cooley/Gullion Area   Slieve Gullion Subarea
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Faughil Hill Jonesborough Hill A name in English
Armagh County, in Binnion List, Microgranite with granophyric texture Bedrock

Height: 241m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J06211 18134 This summit has been logged as climbed by 10 members. Recently by: paddyhillsbagger, eamonoc, Peter Walker, Trailtrekker, chalky, Harry Goodman, muschi, sandman, Fergalh, wicklore
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.377157, Latitude: 54.101392 , Easting: 306211, Northing: 318134 Prominence: 135m,   Isolation: 3.5km
ITM: 706136 818141,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Fghl, 10 char: Faughil
Bedrock type: Microgranite with granophyric texture, (Granophyre)

Faughil is the 1285th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1225/
COMMENTS for Faughil 1 of 1
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Faughil in area Cooley/Gullion, Ireland
Picture: Walker topping out on Faughill.
 
Good track up but seek permission to use it.
Short Summary created by Harry Goodman,  30 May 2014
There is a good track that leads all the way to the top. However access to it is through the grounds of a house located at J0659818435 A and permission to use it should therefore be sought. From the rear of the house pass through a gate and follow the track up as it twists and turns to the top. The last couple of hundred metres of track is along a peat and grass surface with patches of bog. There are fine views across to Slieve Gullion (NW) and to the Cooley Mts (E). The walk up and back is about 2.5 km. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1225/comment/15469/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Faughil in area Cooley/Gullion, Ireland
Picture: Big Joe & Geezer Hold Sam aloft with the Hill in the background before Armagh take him home in 02
Access, Eggs, Flags & Loads of History!!
by Trailtrekker  11 Sep 2014
Faughill, stands at the northern end of the Gap of the North (or Moyry Pass) and is one of the many smaller outliers on the Ring of Gullion. Despite, it’s small size, it has seen more than it’s fair share of action down through history, not least at the once world famous Sunday market at Jonesborough!

Following Harry Goodman's advice I asked permission at the house mentioned and was also readily welcomed (once I didn't have a dog as there are sheep on the hill) and invited to park in their yard. They sell free range eggs at a good price, so it is always nice to reciprocate good will! The summit area shows little evidence of the watchtower that once existed on it and it is a very pleasant little summit plateau with great views of the area.

I can’t remember what was on the flagpole at the summit, I can however put forward a few possibilities for it. Until 2006 watchtower Romeo Two One stood on it’s summit, so the flag was planted after that. It could have been an Armagh flag, for their Ulster final appearances in 06 or 08. The local club are Dromintee, so it could have been for their Armagh Senior final appearance in 2010, (when Crossmaglen Rangers inevitably won!). Or it could have been a tricolour, given the politics of the area.

Long, long before the current border the hills, bogs, lakes and forests of this land created a natural barrier to Ulster, meaning that the only two places to gain access to the province were at Ballyshannon or the Gap of the North. One of the five ancient roads to Tara (oh no, he didn’t mention that hill again!) came from Antrim through the gap. While most of the action and events associated with the gap happened on the southern end of it near Faughart there was one major incident in 1690 at the foot of this hill, when Jacobites ambushed a patrol party of King Billy’s, who had set up camp in Newry. Many of James’ generals had wanted to face William at the gap, but the less than tactically astute James decided the Boyne would be a better spot! How history might have changed if the battle had of been at the northern rather than the southern end of Louth?

In more recent years this hill saw further ambushes. In fact three of the most significant incidents of the entire troubles happened within a 3.5km radius of this hill. The ambush spot for Superintendent’s Breen and Buchanan of the RUC was chosen because it was a “dead spot” (blind spot) from the aforementioned tower. Only two km away and in clear view of the tower Lord Chief Justice Sir Maurice Gibson and his wife were blown up. While Captain Nairac of the SAS is said to have made his final journey near the foot of the hill before being executed just south of the border, in the shadow of Feede mountain. Thankfully the peace process brought this list to an end and the likes of us being able to access a hill is one of the minor benefits it has brought in the overall scheme of things. Long live the peace. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1225/comment/15899/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Faughil in area Cooley/Gullion, Ireland
Picture: Walker on the track up Faughill
 
Excellent short walk to the top.
by Harry Goodman  30 May 2014
Aware of sandmans comments to be aware of access problems on this hill we decided on Mon 26 May 2014 to seek out a track shown on the OSNI Sheet 29 on the eastern side of the hill at J0663318395 B. What we found was that the track entrance was overgrown and appeared to lead up to the back of an adjoining house. In addition there was nowhere to park off road. In view of this I asked at the house if the track did in fact lead up to the hill and if so could we use it for access. Confirmation of a track up from the back of the house and permission to use it was readily given. In addition the house owner also gave us permission to park off road on her property. Although shown on the map as only going part of the way up the hill it does in fact twist and turn all the way to the top. The high point is on a rocky, peat and heather covered little knoll and the flag pole mentioned by Trailtrekker is still in place but without a flag. There is a comprehensive view out across to Slieve Gullion and Camough Mountain (NW) and E to the Cooleys. An enjoyable short walk of 2.5km on an excellent track. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1225/comment/16085/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Faughil in area Cooley/Gullion, Ireland
Picture: Summit Area
What Flag ?
by sandman  28 Feb 2014
Remains of flag pole beside summit at J0621118134 C.Please be aware of access problems. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1225/comment/15888/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
(End of comment section for Faughil.)

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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here