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2016-10-19 12:59:14
Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10

There is a meeting being held in the Yellow House Pub in Rathfarnham in Dublin 14 tomorrow night at 8 pm about some proposed "redevelopments" in and around the Hellfire Club/Montpelier Hill in the Dublin Mountains. Apparently, South Dublin County Council and Coillta are proposing to build a Cable-Car from Tallaght to the Hellfire Club. Sadly, I'm not joking. There's also some plan about a "treetop walkway" from the Hellfire to Massey's Wood.

Its billed as an "information evening" and is being held by Fine Gael TD Colm Brophy. I'm no fan of his or his party but there is scant information available about this and best not shoot the messenger etc.

I'm sure its no more than a PR exercise to get his mush on posters and to gauge the reaction of people to the ideas and then decide whether he's for it or agin' it.

I've included a link to an article The Echo did on it and to Mr Brophy's facebook page about it.



I've nothing against yodeling or goat-herders, but cable cars from Tallaght to the Hellfire Club which you can walk at an easy pace in no time at all? I thought we were supposed to be all about slimming down as a Nation and encouraging people to exercise and be more healthy? Not lurryin' lads up the gentle hills of South Dublin in cable cars so they can hurl cans out the windows and skull as many motorists, sheep and deer as possible on the way up the Tallaght Alps!

Leave it in the flaming hands of the Devil-worshipers and not the Swiss-impersonating gentry.
2016-10-04 10:55:21
"" from mcrtchly Expand pics
(Expand pics)
Quad bikers in the Mournes
Whilst out in the Mournes on Sunday 2nd Oct, at about 8.30am we were shocked to see a group of half a dozen quad bikers powering up the track from the Banns Road towards Lough Shannagh (below Doan and Carn), shattering the peace and beauty of a gorgeous autumn morning with their noise and fumes. They proceeded along the edge of the lake and disappeared heading east below Doan and towards the Silent Valley (which now became the Noisy Valley). They returned about 2 hours later, this time driving through the water at the edge of Lough Shannagh before doing wheelies in the sand on the beach and stopping for drinks (some of them discarding empty coke bottles nearby). One of them even drove up and down through the lake several times right in front of where we were camped on the beach.

We encountered the bikers again on our walk back towards the Banns Road and I stopped to talk with the first driver (presumably the leader). I asked him if quad bikes were allowed in the Mournes and he replied yes. He also said that he owned a small bit of land in Mournes, implying that this gave him right of access. He went on to say that they had driven as far as the Blue Lough in the Annalong Valley. This would require a steep decent to the Silent Valley and back up the other side. We noticed that the track from the Banns Road to Lough Shannagh is already scarred with tyre tracks and loose stones dislodged by vehicle traffic, and was considerably worse after they had passed over it. No doubt significant damage would have been done to the bog by driving across to the Annalong Valley and may even have affected paths repaired by the Mournes Heritage Trust.

We have never before seen any quad bikers in the Mournes and I did ask one local resident about the legality of this activity; she told me that it was not allowed. Do any MV members know if this is the case? If so, then I will notify Mountaineering Ireland and the MHT about the incident. I attach one photo of a quad biker (and have others which clearly show the faces of the bikers).
2016-09-24 20:28:17
Fei Sheehy Challenge 2016
The Fei Sheehy Challenge is a three day self-guided challenge crossing the Comeragh, Galty and Knockmealdown Mountains on successive days. There are options to participate in one, two or the full three days of the Challenge. This was my third year of the Challenge and it brought comfortingly familiar elements – the packing and checking of gear, the worry over fitness levels (for an otherwise confirmed non-challenge walker), the long motorway drive from one end of Ireland to the other and setting up the tent under the same tree in the beautiful Apple campsite – my home for five nights.

Day 1

Registration closed at 7.00am in Clonmel and the bus was off to the far end of the Comeragh Mountains, leaving a return crossing of 40km on foot. Many of the other participants I did not know, some had familiar faces and some I actually spoke to!

An obligatory group photo and we were off into the mist. Each travelled at their own pace, whether a hare or a tortoise, with passing conversations or silent breathless companionship. The sun made a fleeting appearance and my t-shirt got a moment of glory before the wind and mist stamped down on the haul up Seefin. I was on my own with the noise of my boots squelching through the wet ground as heavy mist made the Comeragh plateau a strange and lonely place. Not another soul did I see for kilometre after kilometre and inside I felt a sense of elation – this is what this Challenge is all about!

I took a new route this year dropping down past Sgilloge Loughs and the most amazing waterfall, boosted by the previous night’s rain, as I dropped down out of the mist to The Gap. Climbing Knockanaffrin the wind was brutal and rain showers added to the pain. Arriving back in Clonmel there was a warm welcome with food and drink, including a bunch of garden grown grapes from this mild and (usually) sunny part of the country. This contrasted the soaked state I was in with water having been forced through my waterproofs with the wind.

The first day is always tough and I was glad to be back to put the kettle on the camping stove and cook dinner. There was also the chance to catch up with fellow Challenge participant Steven, who was staying at the same campsite.

Day 2

The wind during the night was something else, with the trees in the campsite swaying in a way that would have made any ballerina proud. With a forecast of further strengthening winds and heavy rain I had to make a decision about my participation on this day of the Challenge – crossing the Galty Mountains, the highest in the SE of Ireland.

I knew in my heart that I wasn’t going to be walking today and that was a huge disappointment as I had completed the treble crossing of the Challenge in the two previous years. But it was okay as it was my decision to make. The brave walkers who did set off had a tough day and only two were able to cross the Galtees before the wind strength made it unsafe to continue. It was a long day at the campsite but a trip to Dungarvin Castle stopped me going stir crazy!

Day 3

This has always been my favourite day of the Challenge, partly as it was the last but also as there was a level of increased fitness built up over the preceding days I had a sort of ‘bring it on’ attitude.

Again the bus set off at 7.00am to the far reaches of the Knockmealdown Mountains, with a faint hope of some better weather for the day ahead. I tagged onto a group of other walkers as we headed into the mist. A steep ascent of Knockmealdown itself brought only the sound of laboured breath and strong wind and rain on the summit, where shelter was found to put on waterproofs and grab a quick bite to eat.

Navigation was key in this weather and the group consulted on the best path to take through the mist which brought us steeply down to the carpark at The Vee and another quick stop. These guys were not hanging around and that did provide a challenge for me as we went straight up the steep slope of Knockshanahullion, where my legs felt like they were on fire at times.

There followed several kilometers over featureless ground in thick mist, where good navigation and local knowledge from some in the group proved invaluable. The last few kilometers were on country roads and I just about managed to grab some lovely ripe blackberries as the fast pace continued to the community centre in Ballyporeen.

This was the undoubted highlight of the Challenge, with such a welcome on arrival and all sorts of sandwiches, buns, cake and gallons of tea on hand. A time to chill, chat and greet others arriving. I had knocked almost an hour of my time for last year on this day of hard going. Medal and certificate presentations were carried out and it was all over for another year. But the feeling of accomplishment in participating in the Challenge and raising money for charity will be enough to tide me over until august 2017
2016-09-16 20:58:33
"The View from the Top" from CaptainVertigo Expand pics
The View from the Top (Expand pics)
Croagh Patrick 10/09/2016
AIDAND, thanks for that post highlighting the fantastic teamwork of Roscommon Civil Defence in helping John Tobin to the summit of Croagh Patrick. Now that's what I call a challenge. What an achievement. I hope you don't mind me reposting the content behind the link. I want the lazy to see this just as much as the rest.

"Members of Roscommon Civil Defence assisted John Tobin along with his family and friends in his assent of Croagh Patrick, the successful attempt in fulfilling a lifelong dream for John was completed on September 10th. The group assembled at the base of the Reek at 08:30 and began the attempt at 10:00 reaching the summit 13:30 this was an emotional moment for all involved. After some peaceful reflection we commenced the descent reaching the base at 17:00. After a debrief everybody reported to be fit and well with no accidents or injuries reported. We would like to express a huge debt of thanks to everybody concerned and in particular Roscommon Civil Defence members Officer Ray Dunne (EMT), Basil Finan (Height Rescue Instructor), Andrew Fox Willie Treacy, Dave Fallon, Kieran Nealon (Paramedic), Evan Finan and Adrian Daly (EMT). We would like to congratulate Basil Finan on the excellent creation of the Dream Machine, without it the attempt would not have been possible. We would like to congratulate John and his family on his wonderful achievement and record breaking attempt."
2016-09-14 13:47:16
Unique ascent of Croagh Patrick
See attached link to the story

2016-09-13 21:40:48
"Picture of Hungry Hill from "West Cork Times"" from CaptainVertigo Expand pics
Picture of Hungry Hill from "West Cork Times" (Expand pics)
German Family Rescued off Hungry Hill
Rte reports that a family of five was rescued from a mountain in Cork in the early hours of 13th September by coast and mountain rescue teams. The family, believed to be German tourists which included three boys aged 8, 10 and 14, had become trapped on a ledge on Hungry Hill the previous night. Castletownbere Coast Guard had been notified shortly before 10pm that the family was in trouble. A rescue helicopter was sent from Waterford which hoisted the boys to safety at around 2am. The two other family members, the boys' sister and their father, who had become separated from the others, were then taken down the mountain by the Coast Guard unit with the assistance of Kerry Mountain Rescue team. The recovery operation finished shortly before 3.30am. It is understood none of the family members needed medical attention.
2016-09-11 12:44:45
"Bulbin Inishowen" from Hilltop-Harrier Expand pics
Bulbin Inishowen (Expand pics)
Inishowen Gem
Sat . 10th Sept. and it was time for a wee hill walk and the weather looked promising. We’d been talking about doing Bulbin for a long time and as we are only back in the hills it’s good to break yourself in easy. We headed for Aughaweel and drove up the road in the general direction of the windmills. The road is reasonable and we parked at Drumlough on the North side of Doo- lough, (a small lake). Because we wanted to take in the views we did not make a b-line for the mountain top, instead we veered to the east side and began our climb from there. The ground was very wet as there had been heavy rain the night before, sections of the mountain appear to have been eroded with the weather with large areas of black moss being exposed, similar to the erosion of sand dunes on a coastline. There is also evidence of a lot of quad activity. The walk took roughly 2 hours,( however this is the longer route, if you come up from the Pinch side it is shorter) at a very leisurely pace and was an easy walk. The views from the summit were brilliant as it was a beautiful sunny day. On top of the hill stands a large 3 metre high concrete cross erected to commemorate Irelands Eucharistic Congress in June 1932, we were glad of the shelter from the structure. We had clocked just over 5km.
2016-08-26 11:41:15
"The purple cross marks the spot" from madfrankie Expand pics
The purple cross marks the spot (Expand pics)
Irelands remotest point map
Ireland's premier get-away-from-it-all location
2016-08-26 11:34:56
Searching for the Remotest Place in Ireland
A couple of weeks ago I came across an interesting article detailing the search for the most remote point in England: http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/outdoorfeatures/2016/6/30/this-is-the-most-remote-point-in-england-but-where-the-hell-is-it
The criteria used was the remotest point from a public road, so with this in mind, I set about attempting to emulate this by finding the remotest place on the island of Ireland.
Scrutinizing OSI and OpenStreet mapping (bearing in mind the flaws and limitations of these sources) and with the help of photoshop, I looked at a number of likely locations. Somewhere in North Mayo seemed the most obvious candidate, but I also checked other areas of extensive wilderness:
The vast swathes of lake-speckled bog in South Connemara, The Wicklow Mountains interior, Mangerton, Maamtrasna, and Donegal’s Bluestacks and Derryveagh Mountains, among others.
And the winner?
As predicted, it was in North Mayo.
A point approximately 2.75 kms south of Slieve Carr on its southern slopes (at about 285m contour) is the furthest point from the nearest public road, approximately 6.6km away. By my reckoning, the grid reference is F91380 11820, should anyone wish to visit this place and get away from it all!
This area of North Mayo is by some distance the largest tract of roadless country in Ireland. Nowhere else (forgive the pun) comes remotely close.
Somewhat surprisingly, the next area with a point furthest from a public road was a point in the Ox Mountains.
2016-08-19 20:20:43
Lavarnia Brook co-ordinates
Hi Asta
My Wicklow mountains West map indicates Lavarnia Brook at around O 110 075 It is the extension to the Inchavore west (upstream) of the R115 road.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 14 Next page >>
Summit Comment
Barnahowna: Fine-weather photo
bryanmccabe 5 hours ago.
Thought a fine-weather photo of Barnahowna summit was needed!

Summit Summary
Maumtrasna North-East Top: Worth a visit!
Collaborative entry Last edit by: bryanmccabe 7 hours ago.
Maumtrasna NE top, approximately 2km NE of Maumtrasna, is worth a visit in its own right. The most direct access is via the steep ridge up to nearby spot height 542. One possible starting point is...

Summit Comment
Crossderry: Summit No 2 of a fine ridge walk.
hivisibility 7 hours ago.
Here is another view of Crossderry taken from Mothillín. You can see the twin peaks at the summit area. The summit proper is the one on the right. Knocknabreeda in the background.Its pretty rugged...

Ott Mountain to Slieve Meelmore
Aidy a day ago.
Started at the Ott/Blue Quarry car park on the Moyad Road, and took a route taking in six summits, going over Ott Mou... walk, Len: 10.9km, Climb: 730m, Area: Ott Mountain, Mourne Mountains (Ireland)

Summit Comment
Mothaillín: Fabulous views to the west from the summit.
hivisibility a day ago.
Fine view towards Broghnabinnia and Caher from Mothillín summit.

Forum: General
Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10
cave-dweller 3 days ago.
Hello, There is a meeting being held in the Yellow House Pub in Rathfarnham in Dublin 14 tomorrow night at 8 pm about some proposed "redevelopments" in and around the Hellfire Club/Montpelier Hill...

Summit Comment
Mothaillín: Summit area as seen from Crossderry.
hivisibility a day ago.
Mothillín summit from Crossderry.

Glenbeigh to Galway's Bridge
GSheehy a day ago.
I?m putting this one up because it was a club walk and I was thinking about the other day. There aren?t too many clu walk, Len: 40.5km, Climb: 917m, Area: Glenbeigh Horseshoe (Ireland)

Summit Comment
Crossderry: Towards Knocknabreeda and Stumoa Dúloigh
hivisibility a day ago.
The view towards Knocknabreeda fro Crossderry summit. Stumpa Dúloigh in the background. Knocknabreeda summit is located over to the far left of the ridge.

Summit Comment
Crossderry: Summit looking East.
hivisibility a day ago.
Summit of Crossderry with view back towards Mothillín.There are 2 similar heights at the summit area. The summit is the one nearest the Eastern Reeks.

Peak bagging in The Sperrins in autumn
peter1 2 days ago.
Again, the use of a mountain bike is highly recommended for this route, if you are a solo walker. I left my bike in a... walk, Len: 16.2km, Climb: 1048m, Area: Mullaghclogha, Sperrin Mountains (Irela

Forum: General
Quad bikers in the Mournes
mcrtchly 2 weeks ago.
Whilst out in the Mournes on Sunday 2nd Oct, at about 8.30am we were shocked to see a group of half a dozen quad bikers powering up the track from the Banns Road towards Lough Shannagh (below Doan...

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 14 Next page >>