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Bunsen7: Track 3729 in area near Mullaghcleevaun, Dublin/Wicklow (Ireland)
North of Mullaghcleevaun
Length: 12.2km, Creator time taken: 3h31m, Ascent: 632m,
Descent: 628m

Places: Start at O04384 10845, Mullaghcleevaun, Black Hill, end at Start
Logged as completed by 1
This is a place I had wanted to go back to as Blessington is one of the more accessible wicklow towns from my base. This route (or at least the first half of it) is less well trodden and makes a loop rather than the more customary out and back from this startpoint. It is described in Helen Fairbairn's book on the Dublin and Wicklow Mountains.
To the north of Mullaghcleevaun, west of the cleft on its north east side which contains the elusive Cleevaun Lough, is a grassy spur which veers north westerly downhill into slopes cloaked in deep heather, before reaching a stream and forestry.
This route takes a clockwise journey from Ballynultagh Gap car park to the base of this spur and follows it upwards over the more challenging heathery terrain towards Cleevaun Lough, before returning over the much easier and direct route towards Biilly Byrne's gap and then onto Black Hill.
The route follows along forest tracks initally eastwards and then southwards. Careful review of these tracks is recommended to avoid a wrong turn.
Before the forest track finally veers westward (to no particular destination), a rusted gate presents itself at O0606709162. Now you're challenged to tackle trackless wild ground. Eventually the slope does relent and the walking is easier. A more easterly bearing will take you towards Cleevaun Lough, though it is easy to be drawn closer to the summit ridge.
On a cold dry end of winter day, the grassy sections were easily traversed, but expect wet ground in summer.
Looking towards Sally Gap and Gravale from area north of M-Cleevaun
A half-shot of Cleevaun lough in three states of freezing
Looking back to Black Hill and Sorrel Hill from frosty M-Cleevaun

Uploaded on: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 (08:37:45)
Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/track/3729/  
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Note: ALL information such as Ascent, Length and Creator time taken etc should be regarded as approximate. The creator's comments are opinions and may not be accurate or still correct.
Your time to complete will depend on your speed plus break time and your mode of transport. For walkers: Naismith's rule, a rough and often inaccurate estimate, suggests a time of 3h 30m + time stopped for breaks
Note: It is up to you to ensure that your route is appropriate for you and your party to follow bearing in mind all factors such as safety, weather conditions, experience and access permission.

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Some mapping:
Open Street Map
(Various variations used.)
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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