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Slieve Carr Mountain Corrshliabh A name in Irish
also Corslieve an extra name in English
(Ir. Corrshliabh [OSNB*], 'conspicuous/pointed mountain') Mayo County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites. Bedrock

Height: 721m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 23 Grid Reference: F91493 14498
Place visited by 122 members. Recently by: jmcg, Oileanach, Grumbler, ilenia, Lauranna, Richtea, eamonoc, philmchale, daveevangibbons, billh999, jamesmforrest, hivisibility, Ulsterpooka, FrankMc1964, sheilakilduff
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.658117, Latitude: 54.06825 , Easting: 91493, Northing: 314498 Prominence: 646m,  Isolation: 2.5km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 491469 814507,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvCr, 10 char: Slieve Car
Bedrock type: Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites., (Bangor/Corslieve Formation)

Also known as Slieve Cor or Corslieve. The Discovery map links the name Corslieve with a neighbouring peak (541m) situated about 3 miles to the south, but the Ordnance Survey Name Book and William Bald's map of Mayo (1830) show quite clearly that it is simply an alternative for Slieve Carr, with the same elements inverted. A cairn on the summit is named Laghtdauhybaun on the old ½ inch map, but is unnamed on the Discovery map. This is probably derived from Ir. Leacht Dáithí Bháin, 'burial monument of white Dáithí'. There may be a connection with Dáithí, a king of Connacht and reputed last pagan high-king of Ireland (see Slieve Alp).   Slieve Carr is the second highest mountain in the North Mayo area and the 97th highest in Ireland.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/
COMMENTS for Slieve Carr << Prev page 1 2 3 4  
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Possible with Nephin Beg in a day
by jimgraham  11 May 2013
Just to note that I found it possible to combine Slieve Carr with Nephin Beg. Working from the southern end of the Bangor trail (point F) it took me four hours to gain the top of Carr; about two hours up the trail, an hour gaining the fairly easy col between Carr and Nephin Beg, and an hour to the top. Five hours back to the car via the top of Nephin Beg, working the eastern side of the col, that is east of Scardaun Loughs. A hard walk on a nice day, but well worth it.

There are incidentally notices on the Bangor Trail that there is a (presumably significant) footbridge down further north towards Bangor on the trail. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/14989/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
A hard tough walk through the wilderness
by paul condon  6 Sep 2014
September 2014 Slieve Carr is not for the faint hearted. We started from the footbridge "San Francisco" over the Tarsaghaunmore River off the N59 and headed East to join the Bangor Trail. After approx 2kms headed for the slopes of Tawnyanruddia on to Cor Slieve and finally to Slieve Carr 721mtrs. To complete the circuit we headed North towards Maumykelly and cut West in the col and headed West to pick up Bangor Trail and back to cars. This circuit is 20.3kms and the ground for the most part is bog and wilderness. It took close to 7 hrs to complete given the underfoot conditions. Weather was poor low cloud so no views to redeem this walk. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/17666/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: Early morning mists on Slieve Carr - taken from the west
 
Ireland's two most remote peaks in one day
by Colin Murphy  19 Oct 2014
We set ourselves the challenge of bagging Slieve Carr and Nephin Beg in the same day in October, which required a car at either end of the route. Started at 7.45 am, parking at the end of a narrow road/track at 866 073 A. There is a substantial track running for about 7km to the east indicated on the OS map, which seems to cross the Owenduff River soon after the parking spot, but the river was almost in flood the day we did the walk and there was no means of crossing. So we continued over the open ground to the south of the river, the going being reasonably good but with occasional boggy patches and areas of tall grass. Eventually the river narrowed enough to cross at point 895 085 B and we crossed very flat and increasingly squelchy ground to the NE for 3km to point 915 115 C, where we began our ascent directly to the north up very steep but solid ground. At point 913 124 D we turned east for a few hundred metres before turning north up the gently rising slope for 2km to the summit of Slieve Carr, marked by a huge burial mound and a trig pillar. From here we partly re-traced our steps to point 921 121 E and descended a very steep grassy slope to the col. We skirted around the east of the two loughs and began our ascent of Nephin Beg at 935 115 F. A steep but quite manageable climb over grass and rocks. The summit is marked by a small cairn. It had been dry up to this point but the rest of the walk was completed in heavy rain and high winds. From there we proceeded directly south, bagged the Carn, Nephin Beg South Top, then descended to the Bangor Trail at 933 077 G. Followed the trail for 5km back to car park at 973 054 H. The last 30 minutes of the walk was in darkness and required the use of head lamps. The entire walk took 11.5 hours. Extremely challenging day! Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/17730/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
Long Day
by Fergalh  12 Jun 2014
Like others before hand we did the two trail strategy, In via the Bangor and out via the western way, Just three small things to add. 1. A route up from the bangor trail is to climb up via the waterfall to the lakes which are on the saddle between Nephin Beg and Slieve Carr. Starting point for this is F91640 11025 I. 2.On the descent to the forest there is now a wooden steps to the gap between different coloured trees marked at roughly I on the map, this than leads to track that leads to western way. When descending from Slieve Carr via lake no. 389 and the colls watch out for the line between the coloured trees as it is hard to spot this gap from above. 3. When you pass the Mountain shelter on the track heading for the western way don't forget to sign the visitors book. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/16110/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
COMMENTS for Slieve Carr << Prev page 1 2 3 4
(End of comment section for Slieve Carr.)

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