Slieve Carr 721m mountain, North Mayo Nephin Beg Range Ireland at MountainViews.ie
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Slieve Carr Mountain Corrshliabh A name in Irish
also Corslieve an extra name in English
(Ir. Corrshliabh [OSNB*], 'conspicuous/pointed mountain') Mayo County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites. Bedrock

Height: 721m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 23 Grid Reference: F91493 14498
Place visited by 113 members. Recently by: billh999, jamesmforrest, hivisibility, Ulsterpooka, FrankMc1964, sheilakilduff, JimMc, tsheehy, mickdylan, Krumel, johnstna, Onzy, PaulNolan, oakesave, dodser
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.658117, Latitude: 54.06825 , Easting: 91493, Northing: 314498 Prominence: 646m,  Isolation: 2.5km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 491469 814507,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvCr, 10 char: Slieve Car
Bedrock type: Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites., (Bangor/Corslieve Formation)

Also known as Slieve Cor or Corslieve. The Discovery map links the name Corslieve with a neighbouring peak (541m) situated about 3 miles to the south, but the Ordnance Survey Name Book and William Bald's map of Mayo (1830) show quite clearly that it is simply an alternative for Slieve Carr, with the same elements inverted. A cairn on the summit is named Laghtdauhybaun on the old ½ inch map, but is unnamed on the Discovery map. This is probably derived from Ir. Leacht Dáithí Bháin, 'burial monument of white Dáithí'. There may be a connection with Dáithí, a king of Connacht and reputed last pagan high-king of Ireland (see Slieve Alp).   Slieve Carr is the second highest mountain in the North Mayo area and the 97th highest in Ireland.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/?PHPSESSID=oolejih073stj3ial8mqpq0qv6
COMMENTS for Slieve Carr << Prev page 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
Re Colin Murphy's comment dated 19 Oct 2014
by barrymayo  3 Nov 2014
Regarding the " substantial track running for about 7km to the east indicated on the OS map ... [which starts] at the end of a narrow road/track at 866 073 A G ... which seems to cross the Owenduff River soon after the parking spot " I would very strongly advise everybody to avoid this.

This ancient "track" is lethal and has not been maintained for decades. It leads you into very deep and potentially very wet blanket bog. Honestly, don't even think about it. I am not kidding when I say you'd be putting your life at risk. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/17740/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: Altnabrocky Hut
 
Two legs and two wheels
by peter1  1 Jun 2015
Following on from various comments about approaches to Slieve Carr (Simon3, bryanmcabe, Feargalh), I opted for an approach from the East. Parking at the entrance to the forest at F 96779 16183 B, which I don't recommend as it is in private property - I know this because a note was left on my windscreen telling me not to park here. I then cycled the Western Way to point F 94773 12498 C, aiming for the exit from the forest marked J, taking around 50 minutes to get here. The Western Way section is very easy to cycle using a mountain bike - in fact, I could have driven it! The section up to J is tougher but worth the effort for the cycle back down at the end of the day. As an aside, there is a very good shelter here, the Altnabrocky Hut, - see photo, for those planning an overnight.
From the exit of the forest, I then headed across the saddle to climb Nephin Beg, 60 - 70 kph winds with driving rain and sleet showers pushing me up the hill and I was in full winter gear at this point (so important to check the weather forecasts in the days before a trip like this). Back the same way then to cross the saddle to begin the climb up Corrslieve. At least for this steep climb I had the advantage of some shelter from the wind, however as I approached the plateau, another squall came in, snow this time, and I enjoyed a second lunch while it blew through. Up onto the plateau then and into the wind. It's a gently sloping climb to the summit and I was a bit surprised at how emotional I felt reaching this summit... I had been climbing this mountain in my mind for years!
I met two other people on the summit who were making their way, via Slieve Carr, to the shelter I passed earlier and as they returned to the col to pick up their rucsacs, I headed for the SE ridge, D. Back at my bike, I had my final lunch before a very fast descent back to the car. i have uploaded a track for this, however, as I didn't change the settings between cycling and walking, the details look a bit strange!
Round trip is 27k and took me 7h15m. Highly recommended! Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/18009/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: Four lakes in one photo, taken on a ridge running SE off Slieve Carr.
the hard and the easy ways
by bryanmccabe  1 Aug 2011
Yesterday, a friend and I fulfilled a two year ambition to summit Slieve Carr. Starting at the Brogan Carroll bothy, we followed the Bangor Trail on the outward route and returned by a forest track leading to the Western Way. The route did not include Nephin Beg. The following information may be helpful to people considering a hike to the summit believed to be the most remote in Ireland:
Distance to summit: 13.2km, took us 4 hours 15 mins.
Total round trip distance: 26.9km, finished in just under 8 hours overall including all stops.
Don't be fooled by the modest height of the summit at 721m, the accumulated height gain for this hike is a considerable 1266m; as both Bangor Trail and Western Way are undulating routes. For example, after 8.3km on the Bangor Trail (at a grey post), the point at which we departed the trail to head for Corslieve, the elevation was 154m yet we had already accumulated 371m of ascent!
The ascent from the saddle between Nephin Beg and Corslieve to Corslieve is steep; don't forget the Lucozade! Thereafter the gradient up to the summit cairn and trig pillar is kind.
When coming off the mountain, the spur north of the corrie lake marked 389m on the OSI map offers an easy and scenic descent. The photo shows that you can actually see four lakes (some corries) all at once; Nephin Beg is the mountain in the background. This spur also conveniently lines you up for the forest road at F936124 D D, and is visible from the top of the ridge on a clear day. There is a little clearing which will lead you to the road; although beware of deep forest drains covered in long grass. Turn right and after 1.7km, this track drops you onto the Western Way. Turn right, signed Nephin Beg. A further 8.5km will return you to the start. We brought trainers to change into when we got to the track which made for a hastier and more comfortable egress; we all know unpleasant it can be to walk with hiking boots on hard surfaces, especially having already walked 16.7km!
A viable option, for those looking for a dual-mode adventure, would be to cycle from the bothy to F936124 D D, and knock 10.2 x 2 = 20.4km off the full walk (which is 27.4km out and back along the Western Way), leaving just 3.5 x 2 = 7km on foot. Would that be cheating? The track is only suitable for mountain bikes in my opinion, I wouldn't recommend hybrids. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6446/
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mikek on Slieve Carr, 2004
by mikek  21 Aug 2004
Climbed Slieve Carr in Aug 2003, as part of an attempted two day hike from Bangor to Mullranney. After a tough 6.5 hour hike along the trail from Bangor I camped to the S of Tawnyanruddia near a galvanized 'crinkly tin' bothy erected as a shelter on the Bangor Trail Ref:905113 E (I would have saved the extra weight of a tent had I known). Trail was very wet and difficult under foot after a prolonged wet spell. Site was absolutly magnificant with the vast expanse of the Owenduff valley streching out to the SW; not a person or house in sight. I soon realised that my ambition was slightly beyond my fitness levels at the time, and so an alternative plan was hatched. The following morning I climbed Slieve Carr from the tent. The ground was dry and firm and I was blessed with clear weather on the summit, which possesses a substantial cairn built by some very early members of the Celtic hillwalking fraternity (slightly tougher than the current breed). It also has some unrivalled views of the vast area of forest/bogland to the east; which also contains a large windfarm and turf burning station at Bellacorick. The revised plans did not allow time for a visit to Nephin Beg, which combined with Slieve Carr would make a great day out. The map indicates a track out through the Owenduff valley to Srahduggaun Ref:866072 F, which was to be my new destination. Track of sorts would be a better description as it was only slightly less wet than the adjacent bog, and one which should be avoided only after a prolonged dry spell. It should also be noted that there are two rivers to cross which could prove difficult in certain conditions. Slieve Carr is a remote mountain which is well worth the effort to get to if you enjoy the feeling of space. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/1099/
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three5four0 on Slieve Carr, 2009
by three5four0  16 Apr 2009
We climbed Slieve Carr last Sunday (Easter 2009), via Nephin Beg S Top, Nephin Beg & Corslieve and back via The Bangor Trail to the carpark before Srahmore Lodge. What a day!, sunny & clear, a bit breeze on the tops perhaps, but the views towards Achill were fantastic.

Is this the most remote hill on the Mountain Views website?, or are there other candidates lurking elsewhere ?, I made it 14 km back from the summit to our car along the Bangor Trail. Which, lets face it, is only marginally less soft than the surrounding bog, so its not exactly a quicker way back. So, is Slieve Carr Irelands' Carn an Fhidhleir or even it's Seana Bhraigh, discuss ! Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/3721/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: Slieve Carr south with Nephin Beg, left.
 
Views south and east.
by simon3  22 Apr 2012
Ascending Slieve Carr on its SE spur gives views of its South ridge, right and Nephin Beg, left. This pictures is somewhat similar but on a better day to the one uploaded by bryanmccabe. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6784/
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COMMENTS for Slieve Carr << Prev page 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
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