Slieve Carr 721m mountain, North Mayo Nephin Beg Range Ireland at MountainViews.ie
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Slieve Carr Mountain Corrshliabh A name in Irish
also Corslieve an extra name in English
(Ir. Corrshliabh [OSNB*], 'conspicuous/pointed mountain') Mayo County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites. Bedrock

Height: 721m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 23 Grid Reference: F91493 14498
Place visited by 115 members. Recently by: philmchale, daveevangibbons, billh999, jamesmforrest, hivisibility, Ulsterpooka, FrankMc1964, sheilakilduff, JimMc, tsheehy, mickdylan, Krumel, johnstna, Onzy, PaulNolan
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.658117, Latitude: 54.06825 , Easting: 91493, Northing: 314498 Prominence: 646m,  Isolation: 2.5km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 491469 814507,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvCr, 10 char: Slieve Car
Bedrock type: Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites., (Bangor/Corslieve Formation)

Also known as Slieve Cor or Corslieve. The Discovery map links the name Corslieve with a neighbouring peak (541m) situated about 3 miles to the south, but the Ordnance Survey Name Book and William Bald's map of Mayo (1830) show quite clearly that it is simply an alternative for Slieve Carr, with the same elements inverted. A cairn on the summit is named Laghtdauhybaun on the old ½ inch map, but is unnamed on the Discovery map. This is probably derived from Ir. Leacht Dáithí Bháin, 'burial monument of white Dáithí'. There may be a connection with Dáithí, a king of Connacht and reputed last pagan high-king of Ireland (see Slieve Alp).   Slieve Carr is the second highest mountain in the North Mayo area and the 97th highest in Ireland.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: Slieve Carr from East showing steep quartzite scree slopes.
 
Challenging, remote, with great views.
Short Summary created by simon3,  23 Apr 2012
This summit may be the most remote and hard to get to of any in Ireland. It has considerable merit, having a magnificent 400m ridge on the summit, which has an enormous burial mound and great views of Achill and most of the Nephin Begs.
There are at least four approaches, from the East, West, North and South.

From East: Park at F 9759 1664 A outside a sometimes locked gate. Ask permission at the house at F9657 1602 B. Proceed along a forest track over a newish bridge into the forest. The track winds its way to a small lake at around F945145 C . Head SSE along a fence to open ground. It is possible but dangerous to ascend directly to the summit from where you emerge. Better to contour to around F923132 D and go up the SE ridge. Round trip will take 5 - 6 hours.

From West one way is to start at F85390 15197 E where there is a footbridge. Ask permission of locals and in particular at the house that the bridge leads to and note that this is a sheep farm so dogs or large parties are most unlikely to be welcome. Walk east to the Bangor Trail and use it to get to the Tawnyanruddia spur. and then up the S ridge and spur of the summit.

From North walk South along the Bangor Trail from Bangor Erris to the Tawnyanruddia spur.

From South walk North along the Bangor Trail from where it meets the public road at around F977048 F to the Tawnyanruddia spur. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/4854/
 
New Comment: Great hike in ideal conditions
by philmchale  Wed 15 May
I also did the two trail route from Letterkeen (Bangor Trail in: Western Way back) and had excellent weather and fairly dry conditions. One slight variant was to leave the Bangor Trail at T920097 G when it started downhill, and to contour round the hillside (aiming for a gleaming chunk of quartz), which brought me out just below the outfall from Scardaun Lakes at T921111 H. The southeast spur from the summit ridge offers a good way down, and from the knoll at T932125 I you can head straight down to a small clearing in the forestry that drops you at a set of steps down onto the forestry track. There has been a lot of clear cutting (May 2019) so the views on the way back are better. 27.4 km, 1074 m elevation gain, 5:54 walking time, 7:03 elapsed. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/20524/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: Isolation
The little tin bothy
by wicklore  25 Aug 2010
Just like MV member Geo recently did, I also fulfilled a long held wish to climb Slieve Carr. Carr is widely held to be the most remote hill in Ireland, using a definition of being furthest away from roads, houses and people. The summit is about 14 kms from the nearest road along the Bangor Trail. The Trail is a 30km route that takes you through the area of near-wilderness of North Mayo in which Slieve Carr is situated. The Trail is little more than a guessing game at times as it passes through the most remote expanses of bog, and you need your wits about you when the bad weather closes in! The Trail skirts the SW slopes of Carr, and most people approach Carr from the north or south along it. Other hardy souls make a beeline from the west or east across vast expanses of bog or through kilometres of forest. This route is shorter, but equally challenging. It’s also possible to combine Slieve Carr with Nephin Beg.
Rather than going for a marathon 28km there-and-back hike in one day, I opted to stay overnight at a ‘tin bothy’ I had read about near the half way mark of the Trail. I planned to head to the bothy and sleep there after climbing Nephin and Carr. I started from the south and followed the Trail for several kms. This section is well marked, easily followed and a great warm up as you follow a river valley. Nephin Beg S Top is reached after about 4.5kms and I branched off the Trail to climb it. From here I continued on to the main Nephin Beg top. The views back to Glennamong and Corranabinnia were great in between the heavy rain showers.

After Nephin Beg there is a steep descent to the col with Slieve Carr. Carr presented as a hulking mass with steep sides from this angle. I had a heavy rucksack weighing 18-20 kilos. Because of this I was slowed down considerably and I was tired after several hours walking after an early start driving from Dublin. I decided to head straight for the tin bothy and attempt Carr the following morning. As I diverted back down onto the Bangor Trail in the vast bog below I dreamed of a comfortable, warm bothy, with a fireplace and furniture. I wearily reached the tin bothy an hour from Nephin Beg, my rucksack getting heavier in the trudge through the bog. As I reached the bothy I was presented with the sight of a ramshackle tin box with a hole in the roof and broken plywood floor. As I stepped inside the 7 x 9 foot box the floor cracked further as it was soaked from the rain coming in the open door and broken roof. I made the most of it and had a surprisingly comfortable night, enjoying the absolute silence of this most remote of Irish places.

Carr was climbed the next day and it was a surprisingly ordinary mountain, with boggy peat hags, small rock fields and a massive cairn. Someone called ‘Neary’ proclaimed his visit to the hill in 2010 by scrawling his name on top of the summit Trig Pillar. Remote in many ways Carr may be, but sadly still subject to graffiti. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6053/
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Re Colin Murphy's comment dated 19 Oct 2014
by barrymayo  3 Nov 2014
Regarding the " substantial track running for about 7km to the east indicated on the OS map ... [which starts] at the end of a narrow road/track at 866 073 J G ... which seems to cross the Owenduff River soon after the parking spot " I would very strongly advise everybody to avoid this.

This ancient "track" is lethal and has not been maintained for decades. It leads you into very deep and potentially very wet blanket bog. Honestly, don't even think about it. I am not kidding when I say you'd be putting your life at risk. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/17740/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: A sense of scale
 
This is really remote!
by wicklore  25 Aug 2010
This view shows the vast Owenduff Valley stretching off into the distance to the southwest of Slieve Carr. I have marked the tiny bothy set amidst the massive plain. It is several hours hike to the nearest house, and for absolute quiet and solitude it’s a highly recommended place to go. However the bothy is in poor repair so bring a tent or a waterproof bivvy bag! Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6054/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Carr in area North Mayo, Ireland
Picture: http://www.youtube.com/user/mcrtchly#p/a/u/0/rz1jfKNBr0k
The Edge of Europe
by CaptainVertigo  27 Jun 2011
I have yet to make my way to Slieve Carr in remotest Nephin Beg, although I have looked longingly in that direction from Corraunabinnia and adjacent peaks.The Nephin Begs are very special, and this lovely film by Sharron Schwartz and Martin Critchley is an important addition to our body of knowledge as we prepare to head into this wilderness. I like the gritty realism of the piece. All the usual suspects are there: drizzle, squelching bogs and low cloud. But there is also the moment of redemption, the magic moment known only too well to the Irish walker...as the clouds part, and the awesome vista of the western edge of Europe hangs briefly in front of you. Highly recommended Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6388/
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