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Nephin Begs Area , NW: Slieve Carr Subarea
Feature count in area: 28, all in Mayo, OSI/LPS Maps: 22, 23, 30, 31, CBW, EW-ACC, EW-WNN, EW-WNS
Highest Place: Slieve Carr 721m

Starting Places (24) in area Nephin Begs:
Altnabrocky Adirondack Shelter, Bellanaderg Bridge, Brogan Carroll Bothy, Bunnahowna Bridge, Bunnahowna River, Burrishoole Loop, Cloondaff Church, Deel River, Furnace Lough E, Glasheens River, Glendahurk Bridge, Glennamong Bridge, LFeeagh E Treenbeg Cottage, LFeeagh E Treenbeg School Ruin, Lough Avoher Hut, Lough Feeagh, Lough Gall NW Mayo, Loughanawillan Loughs Track, Mulranny Post Office, R312 Boghadoon, R312 Prughlish, Srahduggaun, Tarsaghaunmore River, Wild Nephin Wilderness

Summits & other features in area Nephin Begs:
Cen: Glennamong: Bengorm 582m, Bengorm NW Top 468m, Corranabinnia 716m, Corranabinnia SW Top 687m, Glennamong 628m, Glennamong East Top 415m, Tirkslieve 401m
Cen: Nephin Beg: Aroher Hill 285m, Lettertrask 279m, Nephin Beg 627m, Nephin Beg South Top 410m
E: Birreencorragh: Birreencorragh 698m, Birreencorragh South Top 564m, Birreencorragh West Top 551m, Buckoogh 588m, Bullaunmore 388m, Knockaffertagh 517m, Mount Eagle 427m, Srahmore 186m, Srahrevagh North 282m
NW: Slieve Carr: Bunmore 243m, Sheeanmore 282m, Slieve Alp 329m, Slieve Carr 721m, Tawnyanruddia 531m
SW: Maunthomas: Claggan Mountain NE Top 501m, Maumthomas NE Top 440m, Maumthomas SW Top 477m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Slieve Carr, 721m Mountain Corrshliabh A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
(Ir. Corrshliabh [OSNB*], 'conspicuous/pointed mountain') Corslieve an extra name in English, Curslieve, Mayo County in Connacht province, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Slieve Carr is the highest mountain in the Nephin Begs area and the 98th highest in Ireland. Slieve Carr is the most northerly summit in the Nephin Begs area.
Grid Reference F91493 14498, OS 1:50k mapsheet 23
Place visited by: 166 members, recently by: wintersmick, DarrenY, abeach, Jimmy600leavey, Haulie, poopoobasto, nupat, NualaB, rhw, Carolineswalsh, Carolyn105, ToughSoles, srr45, notjulians, Beti13
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -9.658117, Latitude: 54.06825, Easting: 91493, Northing: 314498, Prominence: 646m,  Isolation: 2.5km, Has trig pillar
ITM: 491469 814507
Bedrock type: Banded, graded and X-bedded quartzites., (Bangor/Corslieve Formation)
Notes on name: Also known as Slieve Cor or Corslieve. The Discovery map links the name Corslieve with a neighbouring peak (541m) situated about 3 miles to the south, but the Ordnance Survey Name Book and William Bald's map of Mayo (1830) show quite clearly that it is simply an alternative for Slieve Carr, with the same elements inverted. A cairn on the summit is named Laghtdauhybaun on the old ½ inch map, but is unnamed on the Discovery map. This is probably derived from Ir. Leacht Dáithí Bháin, 'burial monument of white Dáithí'. There may be a connection with Dáithí, a king of Connacht and reputed last pagan high-king of Ireland (see Slieve Alp). This peak is named Curslieve on Bald’s map of Mayo (1830).
  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvCr, 10 char: Slieve Car

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/94/
Gallery for Slieve Carr (Corrshliabh) and surrounds
Summary for Slieve Carr (Corrshliabh): Challenging, peaceful and remote with great views.
Summary created by markmjcampion, simon3 2023-03-06 09:32:26
            MountainViews.ie picture about Slieve Carr (<em>Corrshliabh</em>)
Picture: Slieve Carr from East showing steep quartzite scree slopes.
This summit in NW Mayo may be the most remote and hard won of any in Ireland. It has considerable merit, having a magnificent grassy 400m ridge on the summit, which has an enormous burial mound and great views of Achill and most of the Nephin Begs.

There are at least 4 approaches, from all four cardinal points.

E. Park at OwMore Rv (F97586 16634) at a sometimes-locked gate. Ask permission at the house at A (F96566 16012). Head along a forest track over a newish bridge into the forest. The track winds its way to a small lake near B (F94558 15438). Head WSW along a fence to open ground. From here, it is possible but dangerous to ascend directly to the summit - better to contour around to C (F92296 13213) and go up the SE ridge. Round trip 5 - 6 hours.

W. Ask permission at last house on the road to park at TarSagMor (F85390 15197). Walk NE, keeping the river on your right, to where the Bangor Trail crosses the Tarsaghaunmore river at a bridge D (F86809 16151) and follow the trail SE to get to the Tawnyanruddia spur. Then head for the S spur of SC and walk N on good ground to the summit. 3hrs+ to top

The N and S approaches are much longer although the S route can be shortened considerably by cycling to E (F93685 12405).

N. Start at Bngor Tr (F86574 22668) and walk S along the Bangor Trail from Bangor Erris to the Tawnyanruddia spur.

S. Walk N along the Bangor Trail from around WildNeph (F97608 04850) to the Tawnyanruddia spur.
Notable tracks – track/1545, track/3567 and long, linear track/3226
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/4854/
Member Comments for Slieve Carr (Corrshliabh)

            MountainViews.ie picture about Slieve Carr (<em>Corrshliabh</em>)
Picture: Isolation
The little tin bothy
by wicklore 25 Aug 2010
Just like MV member Geo recently did, I also fulfilled a long held wish to climb Slieve Carr. Carr is widely held to be the most remote hill in Ireland, using a definition of being furthest away from roads, houses and people. The summit is about 14 kms from the nearest road along the Bangor Trail. The Trail is a 30km route that takes you through the area of near-wilderness of North Mayo in which Slieve Carr is situated. The Trail is little more than a guessing game at times as it passes through the most remote expanses of bog, and you need your wits about you when the bad weather closes in! The Trail skirts the SW slopes of Carr, and most people approach Carr from the north or south along it. Other hardy souls make a beeline from the west or east across vast expanses of bog or through kilometres of forest. This route is shorter, but equally challenging. It’s also possible to combine Slieve Carr with Nephin Beg.
Rather than going for a marathon 28km there-and-back hike in one day, I opted to stay overnight at a ‘tin bothy’ I had read about near the half way mark of the Trail. I planned to head to the bothy and sleep there after climbing Nephin and Carr. I started from the south and followed the Trail for several kms. This section is well marked, easily followed and a great warm up as you follow a river valley. Nephin Beg S Top is reached after about 4.5kms and I branched off the Trail to climb it. From here I continued on to the main Nephin Beg top. The views back to Glennamong and Corranabinnia were great in between the heavy rain showers.

After Nephin Beg there is a steep descent to the col with Slieve Carr. Carr presented as a hulking mass with steep sides from this angle. I had a heavy rucksack weighing 18-20 kilos. Because of this I was slowed down considerably and I was tired after several hours walking after an early start driving from Dublin. I decided to head straight for the tin bothy and attempt Carr the following morning. As I diverted back down onto the Bangor Trail in the vast bog below I dreamed of a comfortable, warm bothy, with a fireplace and furniture. I wearily reached the tin bothy an hour from Nephin Beg, my rucksack getting heavier in the trudge through the bog. As I reached the bothy I was presented with the sight of a ramshackle tin box with a hole in the roof and broken plywood floor. As I stepped inside the 7 x 9 foot box the floor cracked further as it was soaked from the rain coming in the open door and broken roof. I made the most of it and had a surprisingly comfortable night, enjoying the absolute silence of this most remote of Irish places.

Carr was climbed the next day and it was a surprisingly ordinary mountain, with boggy peat hags, small rock fields and a massive cairn. Someone called ‘Neary’ proclaimed his visit to the hill in 2010 by scrawling his name on top of the summit Trig Pillar. Remote in many ways Carr may be, but sadly still subject to graffiti. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6053/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Slieve Carr (<em>Corrshliabh</em>)
Picture: http://www.youtube.com/user/mcrtchly#p/a/u/0/rz1jfKNBr0k
The Edge of Europe
by CaptainVertigo 27 Jun 2011
I have yet to make my way to Slieve Carr in remotest Nephin Beg, although I have looked longingly in that direction from Corraunabinnia and adjacent peaks.The Nephin Begs are very special, and this lovely film by Sharron Schwartz and Martin Critchley is an important addition to our body of knowledge as we prepare to head into this wilderness. I like the gritty realism of the piece. All the usual suspects are there: drizzle, squelching bogs and low cloud. But there is also the moment of redemption, the magic moment known only too well to the Irish walker...as the clouds part, and the awesome vista of the western edge of Europe hangs briefly in front of you. Highly recommended Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6388/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Slieve Carr (<em>Corrshliabh</em>)
Picture: Four lakes in one photo, taken on a ridge running SE off Slieve Carr.
the hard and the easy ways
by bryanmccabe 1 Aug 2011
Yesterday, a friend and I fulfilled a two year ambition to summit Slieve Carr. Starting at the Brogan Carroll bothy, we followed the Bangor Trail on the outward route and returned by a forest track leading to the Western Way. The route did not include Nephin Beg. The following information may be helpful to people considering a hike to the summit believed to be the most remote in Ireland:
Distance to summit: 13.2km, took us 4 hours 15 mins.
Total round trip distance: 26.9km, finished in just under 8 hours overall including all stops.
Don't be fooled by the modest height of the summit at 721m, the accumulated height gain for this hike is a considerable 1266m; as both Bangor Trail and Western Way are undulating routes. For example, after 8.3km on the Bangor Trail (at a grey post), the point at which we departed the trail to head for Corslieve, the elevation was 154m yet we had already accumulated 371m of ascent!
The ascent from the saddle between Nephin Beg and Corslieve to Corslieve is steep; don't forget the Lucozade! Thereafter the gradient up to the summit cairn and trig pillar is kind.
When coming off the mountain, the spur north of the corrie lake marked 389m on the OSI map offers an easy and scenic descent. The photo shows that you can actually see four lakes (some corries) all at once; Nephin Beg is the mountain in the background. This spur also conveniently lines you up for the forest road at F (F936 124), and is visible from the top of the ridge on a clear day. There is a little clearing which will lead you to the road; although beware of deep forest drains covered in long grass. Turn right and after 1.7km, this track drops you onto the Western Way. Turn right, signed Nephin Beg. A further 8.5km will return you to the start. We brought trainers to change into when we got to the track which made for a hastier and more comfortable egress; we all know unpleasant it can be to walk with hiking boots on hard surfaces, especially having already walked 16.7km!
A viable option, for those looking for a dual-mode adventure, would be to cycle from the bothy to F (F936 124), and knock 10.2 x 2 = 20.4km off the full walk (which is 27.4km out and back along the Western Way), leaving just 3.5 x 2 = 7km on foot. Would that be cheating? The track is only suitable for mountain bikes in my opinion, I wouldn't recommend hybrids. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6446/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Slieve Carr (<em>Corrshliabh</em>)
Picture: From here it is around 4.5km to the summit.
Easier ascent up a green carpet.
by simon3 23 Apr 2012
Having read the dire descriptions of trips up Slieve Carr ("14kms from nearest road", "staying at tin bothy", "accumulated height gain is 1266m") we decided on an easterly approach. We found one way up but realised it could be improved, so the route described here is not what we did but what we suggest.

Park at OwMore Rv (F9759 1664) outside a sometimes locked gate. Ask permission at the house at G (F9657 1602). Proceed along a forest track over a newish bridge into the forest. The track winds its way to a small lake at around H (F945 145). Head SSE along a fence to open ground.

It is possible but dangerous to ascend directly to the summit from here. Hazards include very high slope and unstable quartzite scree. A preferable route is to contour from the previously mentioned point of emergence from the forest to around I (F923 123) which is the start of a comparatively gentle ascent up a SE spur. Steep at first, this spur is carpeted with gorgeous green moss. Eventually the gradient drops and you find yourself on a magnificent ridge heading North to the summit. There is a huge cairn at the summit with a small wooden cross apparently commemorating an aircraft crash (or so we were told by a local).

The views on a good day are immense, from much of the Achill/Corraun peninsula to solitary Nephin to the east, by way of Nephin Beg to the south. Track 1545 show the prototype of this route. it took 6hours 20m for 18.7km, somewhat longer than necessary but way shorter than the routes using the Bangor Trail.

Viewing the ground and with the benefit of hindsight, there may well be other easterly routes available perhaps using the tracks in the more mature forest to the south of the route described. bryanmccabe mentions F (F936 124) as one possible forest end. Remember however that the rivers and streams are not necessarily passable. Even in a dry period crossing the main north-south river would have been difficult without the bridge. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6782/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Slieve Carr (<em>Corrshliabh</em>)
Picture: A sense of scale
This is really remote!
by wicklore 25 Aug 2010
This view shows the vast Owenduff Valley stretching off into the distance to the southwest of Slieve Carr. I have marked the tiny bothy set amidst the massive plain. It is several hours hike to the nearest house, and for absolute quiet and solitude it’s a highly recommended place to go. However the bothy is in poor repair so bring a tent or a waterproof bivvy bag! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/94/comment/6054/
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