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Brandon Group Area
Place count in area: 15, OSI/LPS Maps: 70 
Highest place:
Brandon, 951.7m
Maximum height for area: 951.7 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 934 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Brandon Mountain Cnoc Bréanainn A name in Irish
also Mount Brandon an extra name in English
(Ir. Cnoc Bréanainn [OSI], 'Brendan’s hill') Kerry County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred, Irish 900s Lists, Rhythmically bedded sandstone Bedrock

Height: 951.7m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 70 Grid Reference: Q46042 11605
Place visited by 922 members. Recently by: Podgemus, schwann10, Dalcassian, Aciddrinker, learykid, chelman7, abcd, Grumbler, nupat, Richtea, High-King, briankelly, jasonmc, John.geary, Cathal-Kelly
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -10.254336, Latitude: 52.235113 , Easting: 46043, Northing: 111606 Prominence: 934m,  Isolation: 0.6km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 446026 611659,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Brndn, 10 char: Brandon
Bedrock type: Rhythmically bedded sandstone, (Ballymore Sandstone Formation)

Brandon is the only one of Kerry's 3,000 foot peaks located outside the Reeks. It is strongly associated in tradition with St. Brendan the Navigator, from whom it gets its name. The story of St. Brendan, who set sail from Ireland in a boat of wood and leather and found new lands to the west, was popular in many countries of medieval Europe. The mountain was the focus of a pilgrimage, which probably goes back to a time before both St. Brendan and the arrival of Christianty altogether. Its importance may be due to the fact that, being so far west and so high, it is the place where the sun can be seen the latest as it sinks below the horizon. Named Brandon Mountain on OS Discovery map. Called Sliabh nDaidche in Beatha Bhréanainn, St.Brendan's Life, where it is written that he spent three days on the mountain and that he was visited by an angel. It is described as being surrounded by the ocean, which fits well with the topography of Mount Brandon. Alan Mac an Bhaird has ingeniously interpreted mons Aitche as 'mountain of Faithche'. Brandon stands in Faha townland. For further information on the name Sliabh nDaidche, see Paul Tempan, Some Notes on the Names of Six Kerry Mountains, JKAHS, ser. 2, vol. v (2005), 5-19. For the archaeology of this mountain, including the Benagh promontory fort, the Saints' Road, the pilgrimage tradition and the links with St. Brendan, see Archaeology Ireland Heritage Guide No. 29 (published March 2005). For the pilgrimage tradition and customs associated with Brandon, see Máire MacNeill, The Festival of Lughnasa, 101-05.   Brandon is the highest mountain in the Brandon Group area and the 9th highest in Ireland. Brandon is the second most westerly summit in the Brandon Group area.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Brandon in area Brandon Group, Ireland
Picture: Spectacular views of the Dingle Peninsula
 
Spectacular views
by hendycoco  6 May 2016
I climbed Mount Brandon with two friends this April 2016. As the weather had been unpredictable in the preceding days we decided to start from what we perceived to be the safest route starting at the carpark in Ballybrack. The first half of the walk was over a gradual incline over grassy bog. While this is not particularly steep it was relentless and energy zapping. The stations of the cross however proved great in helping us to maintain focus and providing excuses to stop for a minute to catch our breath. We thought we were making great progress until another walker informed us that the peak ahead of us was not the summit. Once we had climbed that peak and walked around the corner we discovered there was a considerable distance left to walk to the real summit. The second part of the walk was over steeper, rockier ground but proved to be easier than expected. We were lucky with the weather and it was dry and sunny for the entire walk, albeit with a cutting wind. The views were spectacular!! The summit was shrouded with cloud and bitterly cold and windy so we didn't delay there long. We met some lovely interesting people on our way up and down and would highly recommend this hike for anyone of average fitness. Topped off with dinner and ice-cream back in Dingle it made for a lovely day out. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/comment/18517/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Brandon in area Brandon Group, Ireland
jackill on Brandon, 2004
by jackill  15 Jul 2004
View of Pat at the end of the Faha Ridge about to go up the last 150 mtrs of Brandon Mountain(left) looking towards the Blaskets.The climb up from the Paternoster lakes looks intimidating as you walk towards it but there is a pretty straightforward path to follow up on to the ridge.
We continued along to Brandon Peak and Gearhane then down to Loch na mBan where we camped overnight.The water in Loch na mBan looked a little unhealthy with algae but the stream flowing out of it looked ok(with some iodine drops). Following morning we continued to Conair Pass .
Excellent weather, foggy on the ascent but clear from Brandon Mountain to Loch na mBan.
Hard slog with 14 kgs of camping gear on your back.
7 hours from cloghane to loch na mBan, 2.5 hrs to Conair Pass.
As a footnote the farmer who owns the land around the car park at the start (Cloghan)was talking to us when we returned to pick up the car the following morning.He said that he always keeps a watch on any cars left there and he wishes people staying out overnight would tell him or leave a note on the windscreen ,we hadn't done(thought it might invite trouble), but he said he had seen us set off with large packs and decided that we must be staying out overnight.With reference to the various warning notices at the start re:theft from cars, he said the only one he knows of was about 5 years ago and he took the thiefs reg. number and the Gardai caught them later.
Good to know there are landowners like him about. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/comment/1024/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Brandon in area Brandon Group, Ireland
Picture: THE WEST STARTS HERE
 
Bleck Cra on Brandon, 2008
by Bleck Cra  15 Jan 2008
“Brending” had backed out as far on to the crag edge as a human being should go. Another inch and the last you would have seen of him, would have been the soles of his shoes. Neither “Brending”, nor I nor the others had been up “Branding Mountain” before. Thus the precipitous drop, covered by soup-coloured cloud behind him, hadn’t entered his horizon. I feared that just whispering “Brending, get out of there.” would elicit enough seismic activity to blip him over the edge. Like a cue ball, he teetered - and peeled a boiled egg. Perhaps this is how the first “Brending”, after whom this mountain is named, got to the New World - not on water but on air. Brandon Mountain is a huge, imposing and unforgettable experience. We learn that Ireland squelches like a sponge because her hills are on the outside and not like Scotland’s on the inside. When we see the vastness of Brandon, we wonder that the whole Irish Midlands isn’t submerged (some would argue it is). Boiling crags, unnerving ridges, silver lakes that tumble out like picture postcards, bog to out-bog bog and an Atlantic panorama to melt the most disaffected hearts. Allegedly - because we saw none of it. Between “Brending’s” back and eternity, there was but a ghost’s breadth when suddenly a figure passed behind him. Or did it? Marking as it does, the very edge of Europe (Dingle Peninsula), it is not the easiest place to get to. This keeps the spieds out but also many purveyors of 21st century services - so it doesn’t suit everyone. The pubs can be great, so before a family sortie, do a recce with a herd of hooligans, a tangible thirst and an uncontrollable urge to bag one of the biggest in Ireland. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/comment/2943/
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breanndan on Brandon, 2005
by breanndan  16 Feb 2005
Ihad been looking up at mt Brandon for 40 years ,then one day decided to climb it and i cannot
stop.Ihave climbet it almost 50 times and still look forward to setting of,in good weather or bad. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/comment/1482/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Brandon in area Brandon Group, Ireland
kran on Brandon, 2004
by kran  12 Apr 2004
Just climbed Brandon yesterday, 11/4/2004. Had planned to take the long route of swinging east off the marked path and walking along the cliffs overlooking the pater noster lakes to the summit, then heading fo Masatiompan and walking back to our starting point along the Dingle way. Unfortunately we arrived later than predicted and decided it would be safer just to walk the marked path to the summit and back down again the same way, rather than trying to find our way in the dark! It was a beautiful day but we were unlucky to reach the top when it was just being covered by a cloud so the view was rubbish. As we looked back up on the way down we could see that it had cleared up and the view would have undoubtly have been amazing. We'll be back again though, earlier in the day and we'll wait next time until the cloud passes. The track up was easy to follow with white marker poles every thirty or so feet apart and 15 crosses every 100m or so apart to guide your way. You'd have to try to get lost! The day was beautiful but the ground was wet and slippery in places and care is needed as one of my Pictures will show. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/comment/915/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Brandon in area Brandon Group, Ireland
 
jackill on Brandon, 2004
by jackill  15 Jul 2004
View from Faha Ridge looking back down the Pater Noster lakes.
The Tourist route (marked with numerous yellow arrows) comes along the left of the photo from Cloghan.The path is marked all the way to the top of Brandon mountain.
The climb form the track up to the Ridge is not as bad as it first looks. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/9/comment/1025/
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(End of comment section for Brandon.)

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