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Purple Mountain Area
Place count in area: 6, OSI/LPS Maps: 78 
Highest place:
Purple Mountain, 832m
Maximum height for area: 832 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 597 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Tomies Mountain Mountain An Chathair A name in Irish
Kerry County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam Lists, Purple sandstone & siltstone Bedrock

Height: 735m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 78 Grid Reference: V89498 86767
Place visited by 367 members. Recently by: bergman, JimMc, Lauranna, PaulNolan, Bunsen7, Juanita, Singo, ilenia, strangeweaver, anekk11, Oileanach, Dean, summitstrife, elin, davsheen
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.610506, Latitude: 52.022416 , Easting: 89498, Northing: 86767 Prominence: 60m,  Isolation: 0.7km
ITM: 489472 586826,   GPS IDs, 6 char: TmsMnt, 10 char: TmsMntn
Bedrock type: Purple sandstone & siltstone, (Ballinskelligs Sandstone Formation)

Cathair ('stone fort') is the name of the highest point (735m) of Tomies Mountain, but not the name of the mountain as a whole (TH). References to Tomish or Toomish Mountain in The Ancient and Present State of the County of Kerry (1756) make it clear that this name applied to the whole of what is now called Purple Mountain. When the name Purple Mountain gained currency in the 19th century as the name applied to the massif in general and its highest top, the name Tomies Mountain was probably relegated in status, referring only to the subsidiary peak. Joyce gives the Irish name as Tuamaidhe and explains it in reference to the two sepulchral heaps of stones on the summit (PWJ, vol. I, p. 336).   Tomies Mountain is the 86th highest place in Ireland. Tomies Mountain is the second most northerly summit in the Purple Mountain area.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/?PHPSESSID=jfkg01biljlp1487hcfqer69s5
COMMENTS for Tomies Mountain 1 2 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tomies Mountain in area Purple Mountain, Ireland
Picture: Tomies (left) and Purple Mountain from the north
 
Follow me up to Tomies
Short Summary created by Peter Walker, jackill,  24 Jul 2014
Park on the roadside at V872 838 A, room for 5 cars, and follow the track past Madmans seat and on to the Glas Loch.
Follow the west shore then steeply up to the east at the back of the lake. This path is very unstable just before the ridge at 560 meters elevation.
Cross over to the eastern side of the ridge, try to pick up zig-zig path that leads eventually to V884 851 B, the col between point 793 meters and the summit of Purple.
Continue on to Tomies
There are two ways down from Tomies.Follow a route directly rough heather which makes for slow unpleasent progress until you gain the lower slopes, it is undoubtable that this is the safer route. The other way is to descend over short heather to the top of Tomies rock . In bad visibility or windy weather be careful, it would be very easy to walk straight over the edge!. Just before you reach the the rocks there is a path close to the cliff edge which will lead you eventually down to a gentler slope- this route has magnificent views over the Gap of Dunloe. Once the lower slopes are gained at around V889 885 C head towards the green shed at V888 892 D, keep to western side of the wire fence( fence and shed are marked only on Hardys map) this marks the corner of the track back to the main road. At V887 893 E on this track either fork will take you to the main road. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/comment/4844/
 
DickyDonut on Tomies Mountain, 2003
by DickyDonut  30 Jul 2003
See my entry re. Purple Mountain. The sun shone on Tomies when we arrived there, walking south to north on the ridge, and we found a beautiful clump of St Patrick's Cabbage! The way down was a little loose and I would not have fancied it coming the other way. Even trying out the newly bought GPS system got rather lost seeking the end of a fence described in our guide, apparently crossing our route several times! However, the ultimate destination was clear so this was not problem, if you don't mind going sideways down steps of heather, with occasional holes between them! Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/comment/594/
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mart on Tomies Mountain, 2005
by mart  21 Aug 2005
I climbed from the side road near the Bridge north of Kate Kearney's,
making my way up the ridge visible from the road. There is a path a
long the ridge but when you reach the steep northern face you seem to
be on your own and it is just a matter of winding your way up.
Once the ground levels out at about 2000ft you can easily pick out the
summits. Tomies mountain presents a steep finale, which may be across a
jumble of large rocks, if you pick your route wrong. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/comment/1895/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tomies Mountain in area Purple Mountain, Ireland
skyehigh on Tomies Mountain, 2005
by skyehigh  21 Aug 2005
I do not seem to be alone in finding the descent from Tomies Mountain rather trying. Flogging through heather is not much fun. Where are the paths? There appear to be a few sheep (?) tracks, but mostly they go in the wrong direction. Perhaps I contributed to my own discomfort by heading towards the top of Tomies Rock to obtain a better view through the Gap (see photo), which meant I had to contour back around the hill. It was pleasant, eventually, to leave the trackless heather behind, but then I had trouble locating a route of descent from the ridge and ended up battling with gorse. Would any member who has found this ascent/descent easy please tell us how? Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/comment/1903/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tomies Mountain in area Purple Mountain, Ireland
 
skyehigh on Tomies Mountain, 2005
by skyehigh  21 Aug 2005
Like its higher companions, Tomies Mountain is a superb viewpoint. This photo of the Reeks across the gap of Dunloe needs no explanation. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/comment/1902/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tomies Mountain in area Purple Mountain, Ireland
Picture: The northern slopes of Tomies
Peter Walker on Tomies Mountain, 2008
by Peter Walker  17 Apr 2008
Four of us did the walk over Tomies and Purple Mountain on a crisp day in mid-April with excellent atmospheric clarity and occasional showers. Starting from Kate Kearney's (882890 F), walking back north up the road before turning right past the bridge...this lane seems to stable many of the jaunting horses, and smells accordingly. And once the going underfoot gets wetter, getting onto the hillside can become a bit of an epic that would probably only become fun if wearing wellies and a gas mask. The climb itself is a bit of a flog through energy-sapping heather, but I still maintain this route is better done in this direction: tarmac might be hard, but the walk back through the Gap (if returning to the start) is much less trying on the temper. If you come across the new(ish) deer fence, stay on the Gap side of it, to save you having to cross it again later. Hardly any traces of a path until you cross a prominent foretop, then the going is straightforward up to the top, which has good shelter from the wind and excellent views. The pic gives an idea of the terrain on the climb, although it does show one of the shallower bits... Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/84/comment/3050/
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COMMENTS for Tomies Mountain 1 2 Next page >>
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