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Sperrin Mountains Area , W: Strabane Subarea
Feature count in area: 64, by county: Derry: 34, Tyrone: 39, of which 9 are in both Derry and Tyrone, OSI/LPS Maps: 12, 13, 6, 7, 8
Highest Place: Sawel 678m

Starting Places (21) in area Sperrin Mountains:
Altinure Road, Banagher Glen Nature Reserve, Barnes Gap Car Park, Crocknakin, Drumnaspar Picnic CP, Glenchiel Road, Glenedra Bridge, Glenelly Road, Parkreagh, Goles Road, Lough Ouske, Moneyneany Village, Moydamlaght Forest, Moydamlaght Road, Mullaghmore, Mullaghbane, Spaltindoagh, Sperrin Hamlet, Sperrin Heritage Centre, Sperrin Heritage Centre W, Sperrin Road, Barnes Top, Sperrin Road, Glashagh Bridge, Sperrin Road, Sperrin

Summits & other features in area Sperrin Mountains:
E: Magherafelt Hills: Slieve Gallion NE Top 493.6m
E: Magherafelt Hills: Slieve Gallion 526.6m
N: Claudy Hills: Crockdooish 321m, Curradrolan Hill 270m, Eglish 277m, Letterlogher 249m, Mullaghmeash Hill 244m, Slieveboy 259m, Straid Hill 303m
NE Cen: Glenelly North East: Barnes Top 456m, Craigagh Hill 460m, Crockbrack 526.1m, Knockanbane Mountain 441m, Meenard Mountain 620m, Meenard Mtn W Top 480m, Mullaghaneany 627m, Mullaghash 480m, Mullaghsallagh 485m, Oughtmore 569m, Spelhoagh 568m
NE: Glenshane North: Benbradagh 465m, Boviel Top 454m, Carn Hill 448m, Carntogher 464m, Moneyoran Hill 414m
NE: Glenshane South: Bohilbreaga 478m, Coolnasillagh Mountain 423m, Corick Mountain 430m, Crockalougha 407m, Mullaghmore 550m, White Mountain 537m
NW Cen: Glenelly North West: Dart Mountain 619m, Dart Mountain North-West Top 525m, Learmount Mountain 489m, Learmount Mountain South Top 492m, Mullaghasturrakeen 581m, Mullaghcarbatagh 517m, Mullaghclogha 635m, Mullaghclogher 572m, Mullaghdoo 568m, Sawel 678m
NW: Maheramason Hills: Clondermot Hill 220m, Gortmonly Hill 218m, Slievekirk 370m
SE Cen: Glenelly South East: Carnanelly 562m, Carnanelly West Top 503.4m, Mullaghbane 467m, Mullaghturk 416m
SE: Cookstown Hills: Cregganconroe 300m, Fir Mountain 362m, Oughtmore 382m
SW Cen: Glenelly South West: Clogherny Top 408m, Craignamaddy 385m, Crocknamoghil 335m, Mullaghbolig 442m, Spaltindoagh 420m
SW: Mullaghcarn: Curraghchosaly Mountain 416m, Mullaghcarn 542m, Mullaghcarn South Top 525m
SW: Newtownstewart Hills: Bessy Bell 420m, Mullaghcroy 242m
W: Strabane: Balix Hill 403m, Knockavoe 296m, Owenreagh Hill 400m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Owenreagh Hill, 400m Hill Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
, Tyrone County in Ulster province, in Carn Lists, Owenreagh Hill is the 958th highest place in Ireland.
Grid Reference H41948 95907, OS 1:50k mapsheet 12
Place visited by: 33 members, recently by: Colin Murphy, eflanaga, Claybird007, dino, wintersmick, Hoverla, trostanite, pmeldrum, LorraineG60, dregish, MichaelG55, eamonoc, Fergalh, madfrankie, eejaymm
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -7.348401, Latitude: 54.809238, Easting: 241948, Northing: 395907, Prominence: 185m,  Isolation: 4.9km
ITM: 641888 895896
Bedrock type: Psammite, (Newtownstewart Formation)
Notes on name: Owenreagh is from Ir. Abhainn Riabhach, 'grey river'. The name refers to a river and also a townland.
  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: OwnrHl, 10 char: OwnrghHil

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/839/
Gallery for Owenreagh Hill (Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí) and surrounds
Summary for Owenreagh Hill (Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí): Simple approach from the north
Summary created by Colin Murphy 2022-08-16 11:19:25
            MountainViews.ie picture about Owenreagh Hill (<em>Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí</em>)
Picture: Near the summit with a distant Errigal peeking from the mist
Parking for a few cars at A (H42361 97258), which is the entrance to Owenreagh Windfarm. Proceed directly up the substantial track for about 1.5km to B (H42190 95979) and then leave the track, turning SW across a heather-covered area for about 300m, crossing a couple of easy fences. The high point is marked by an upright stone. Allow about 1.5 hours up and down.
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/839/comment/5598/
Member Comments for Owenreagh Hill (Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí)
Comment create / edit display placeholder

            MountainViews.ie picture about Owenreagh Hill (<em>Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí</em>)
Picture: From summit to big guns of Sperrins
A big warning before trying this route!!
by gerrym 18 Nov 2011
Starting from the entrance to the extensive windfarm on the hill (C (H423 972)) with plenty of room for parking at this high desolate spot. A large sign warns of deep drainage with the risk of drowning, the risk of falling ice, buried high voltage cables and high crosswinds!! It did make me consider for a few seconds before bypassing the gates where a wire fence had been unceremoniously torn aside.

The broad access road reveals a 6 foot layer of peat at its side as it climbs steadily to reach the first turbines. A couple of offshoots to the left should be ignored and the track soon reaches the summit area (20 mins).

The summit itself is obvious off to the SE over wet and boggy ground crossed by fences. Views reach N over river Foyle, Lough Swilly to the Urris Hills, Ragtin More and Slieve Snaght, NW to Muckish and Errigal and down to the Bluestacks and Bessy Bell and E to the Sperrins draped in an autumnal coat.

It was a beautiful clear day with blue skies and a cool breeze. Lunch was taken sitting against an immobile turbine from within whose bowels something was trying repeatedly to crank up and start. The turbines did give the impression of being a bit old and delapitated, with some clanking and clunking and others having old graffiti at their base.

Return was the same way with great views over the lowlands of the Foyle valley, where isolated showers where dumping their rain and creating rainbows in the low lying sunlight.

A fairly isolated hill with the opportunity to combine it with others in the area to make a full day. Not another soul about so maybe that warning sign does its job. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/839/comment/6631/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Owenreagh Hill (<em>Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí</em>)
Picture: Head above the clouds
The mist comes dropping slow...
by Colin Murphy 16 Aug 2022
I'm paraphrasing Yeats (it's actually 'the peace comes dropping slow'), but I'm moved to verse because an otherwise unremarkable hill was enhanced enormously by the presence of low-lying early morning mist that stretched from the hill right across the Inishowen Peninsula. In the distance I could see the summits of Errigal & Muckish rising from a sea of white, not to mention several turbines poking up their heads. Incidentally, I encountered several wind farm employees in vans on my walk, all of whom greeted me, and so apparently have no issue with hillwalkers accessing their tracks. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/839/comment/23609/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Owenreagh Hill (<em>Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí</em>)
Picture: View of the wild landscape of the Sperrins from the summit area
Record breaking views?
by Aidy 22 Nov 2013
After having just climbed Croaghan Hill in Donegal, I had enough time to include Owenreagh. I parked at the junction of Silverhill Road with Koram Road. Just opposite is another road which proceeds up the hill for a short distance to a dead end. A rough, overgown, boggy track can then be followed, between two fences, with a forest on the left, to the summit. On the short walk up, I had great views of Bessy Bell, and nearby Koram Hill. The television mast on Koram Hill is, according to Wikipedia anyway, the tallest structure in Ireland! I must admit that although it can be seen for miles around, when I stopped there on the drive up, it didn't look that big. I carried on over the summit, through the wind turbines, to the Eastern side of the hill for more stunning views of the Sperrins, the Foyle valley and North Tyrone. Definitely worth the very small amount of effort required for this hill. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/839/comment/15261/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Owenreagh Hill (<em>Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí</em>)
Picture: Muckish, part of the view from Owenreagh
simon3 on Owenreagh Hill
by simon3 1 Oct 2009
Viewed from the nw side of Owenreagh, the dying rays of a summer solstice sun break out behind cloud. The irregular flat backed summit on the skyline is Muckish in the Derryveaghs which is some 53km away - just 20 minutes earlier it was all but invisible in bluish haze.

How come we can see so far? There can be a period of curious clarity around sunset and sunrise where the sunlight is reddish.

Going a little deeper into it: haziness is caused by scattering of light and there are two main sorts of scattering: Mie and Rayleigh. This red-light clarity only works when the atmospheric conditions are such that there isn't much Mie scattering. Mie scattering is caused by larger particles and mist which affects red and blue light in much the same way. The Rayleigh or small particle scattering which caused the earlier haze mostly affects bluer light so when the light from the sun is mostly red there isn't much scattering and hence there is better clarity.

Whatever about the science it was a gorgeous view. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/839/comment/3191/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Owenreagh Hill (<em>Cnoc na hAbhann Riabhaí</em>)
Picture: Wind sails in the sunset.
simon3 on Owenreagh Hill
by simon3 7 Jul 2008
From some quarters the windfarm on Owenreagh is visible as disembodied arms waving frantically above trees. From near in on the west the windfarm isn't visible at all. But from most quarters the appearance of the place is dominated by the turbines which are highly visible and often audible.

One way to go up Owenreagh is to start at D (H41211 95593) to the SW of the top. There's some not so great parking on verges there. A concrete road leads off the main road towards a corner of the forest that covers much of west of the hill. An obvious way of going up is simply to walk up the side of the forest. This was curiously difficult early on because of the roughness of the ground with overgrown rushes. Obviously people have been here before creating the forest and the windfarm but there is no path or sign of walking usage. But you won't have long to puzzle over whether this is a good thing or bad because the walk at 800m isn't far with a climb of around 111m.

The top area is made up of very eroded peat hags. There is no cairn as of June 2008. While Owenreagh Hill only just scrapes into our 400m list, its position on the west of the Sperrins gives it interesting views of Donegal from the east and of course of the Sperrins.
Visible also is Bessy Bell, 420m, 14k to the SW and also covered in wind-turbines. Near and SW is the oddly named Koram 372m. which has a high mast of some sort on it.

Your visit to Owenreagh Hill can be the Summitteer Stroll up and down or you can also do a circuit of the forest by going NW along the north of its side to a road which will lead you south and back to the summit. This makes a walk of around 3.6k. Although short you'd need boots because of the roughness of the ground.

Our photo shows some of the wind-turbines with the west end of the Sperrins beyond. According to a website I read (Jun 2008) some 6 further and larger turbines are to be added to the 10 already there. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/839/comment/3194/
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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills