Slieve Binnian 745.9m mountain, Mourne Mountains Ireland at MountainViews.ie
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Slieve Binnian Mountain Sliabh Binneáin A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh Binneáin [PNNI], 'mountain of the small peak') Down County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Granite granophyre Bedrock

Height: 745.9m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J32055 23314
Place visited by 656 members. Recently by: NoTrespassing, Pepe, jamesmforrest, therealcrow, sir_boba_fett, Dee68, endab1987, chrismcc, livelife2thefull, Seamus-hills, Juanita, CaminoPat, p_treanor, ilenia, padstowe
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Longitude: -5.980057, Latitude: 54.141928 , Easting: 332056, Northing: 323314 Prominence: 281.88m,  Isolation: 0.6km
ITM: 731976 823320,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvBnn, 10 char: SlvBnn
Bedrock type: Granite granophyre, (Mourne Mountains granite)

Also simply known as Binnion/Binneán. Dominates views of the Mourne Mountains from Annalong and Kilkeel. The folklore of Mourne explains the name Beanna Boirche as 'peaks of Boirche', a personal name. This character is said to have ruled his kingdom from Slieve Binnian. The name Binneán refers to the rocky tors which outcrop along the summit ridge. E. Estyn Evans, in his book Mourne Country, gives the name of one of these tors as The Buckie. In a discussion of the boats used at Kilkeel and other ports along the Co. Down coast, he explains the name as follows: Other variants of the lugger which old salts speak of, all of them of Scottish types, were the Fifie, Zulu, Banff and Buckie. One of the lesser tors on the long spine of Slieve Binnian is known as the Buckie, a name which was meaningless to me until I saw it from the east against the sky and recognised a vessel in full sail [Estyn Evans, 159]. On the facing page is a sketch showing Slieve Binnian's backbone seen from the east including the Buckie.   Slieve Binnian is the third highest mountain in the Mourne Mountains area and the 80th highest in Ireland. Slieve Binnian is the third highest point in county Down.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/79/?PHPSESSID=aii0he2bte1ak1fi48cdi4ck81
COMMENTS for Slieve Binnian << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5
Eerie conditions on summit .. by Aidy   (Show all for Slieve Binnian)
 
Rematch With Binnian .. by Aidy   (Show all for Slieve Binnian)
 
Mind how you go on a route Not Recommended
by Pepe  19 Oct 2018
Climbed this yesterday on the route leading from Brackenagh Bridge. Chose this route because I wanted to do Moolieve and the Wee Binnian on the way up. On a plus note a local farmer kindly let me park at the head of the lane leading from Brackenagh - this saved my legs a bit for which I was grateful later. Duly arrived at the col beyond the Wee Binnian and was faced with a steep rise of over 300 metres. This looked just like the rise up Donard facing you at the end of the Bloody Bridge walk-up - steep but straighforward. Boy, I was wrong.
Not only is it steep, but the path disappears at many points leaving you floundering around for a way up. It's so steep that much knee-lifting, and minor scrambling, is involved. Eventually I arrived up top and scrambled to the top of what my map, and a friendly local, told me was the high-point tor. I was not looking forward to the descent.
At one point I crossed a damaged section of the Mourne Wall, hoping to find an easier route down on the other side. I lost my footing and swivelled in slow motion through at least 360 degrees, expecting at any moment my unhelmetted head would crack off the wall and that would be that - curtains! Luckily I didn't hit off anything and managed to regain balance. To cap it all, the final kilometre or so of descent around the base of Wee Binnian was in bright but very slanted evening sunshine - sunshine so slanted my head was up in the glare but the track was in shade, which did not make footfalls easy. I would urge anyone to avoid this way of summiting Slieve Binnian. Take the route up from Carrick Little instead and save yourself a lot of bother and hardship.; Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/79/comment/20086/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
COMMENTS for Slieve Binnian << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5
(End of comment section for Slieve Binnian.)

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