Cookies. This website uses cookies, which are small text files that the website puts on your device to facilitate operation. Cookies help us provide a better service to you. They are used to track general user traffic information and to help the website function properly.

Click to hide this notice for 30 days.
Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Overview
Detail
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any overview map area or any detail map feature.
Detail Map Features
Showing 2 items:
Gortnageragh 418m,
Tracks:
2551, 6km
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill, mountain, island, coastal feature.
Videos
(none available)
Recent Contributions
Get Notifications

Mournes: All the Binnians from Silent Valley

Hellfire Club: Popular and well-loved amenity

Ramble west of Clifden

Cloghmeen Hill: Gives access to a splendid ridge.

Crockuna: Pretty easy but rewarding Carn

Middlequarter: Highest Point is the West Quarter.89m ?

Crownarad: Approach along track from south to distinctive summit.

The Secret Waterfall

Crott Mountain, near Croagh Patrick, now demo

Kilbride Vs Imaal Firing Range Backstory

Croaghonagh: Another access problem?

Croaghacullin: Longish walk but worth the effort.

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions and a privacy policy.
Read general information about the site.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks, shared GPS tracks or about starting places may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk.
See the credits and list definitions.
Video display
Midlands SW Area   SE: Hollyford Hills Subarea
Rating graphic.
Gortnageragh Hill Gort na gCaorach A name in Irish (Ir. Gort na gCaorach [OSI], 'field of the sheep') Tipperary County in Munster Province, in Carn List, Pale & red sandstone, grit & claystone Bedrock

Height: 418m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 66 Grid Reference: R85746 52173
Place visited by 33 members. Recently by: Moirabourke, Arcticaurora, chelman7, Krzysztof_K, johncusack, CusackCharlie, JohnRea, Colin Murphy, garrettd, maryblewitt, sarahryanowen, LiamG1951, seaniemull, John.geary, FrankMc1964
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -8.211238, Latitude: 52.621004 , Easting: 185746, Northing: 152173 Prominence: 143m,  Isolation: 3.9km
ITM: 585696 652217,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Grt418, 10 char: Grtngrgh
Bedrock type: Pale & red sandstone, grit & claystone, (Keeper Hill Formation)

Gortnageragh is the 858th highest place in Ireland.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/746/
COMMENTS for Gortnageragh (Gort na gCaorach) 1 of 1  
Follow this place's comments
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Gortnageragh (<i>Gort na gCaorach</i>) in area Midlands SW, Ireland
Picture: The trig with Galtees in distance
 
Running up that hill
Short Summary created by Colin Murphy, jackill  8 Dec 2022
Park your car at the forest entrance R87571 52878 starA, room for 5 cars. Walk west along a forest track which narrows and enters more dense forest as it turns sharply south at approx. R85453 52650 starB. The trig pillar is over a low wire fence in a field next to the telcoms mast on the forest edge.
This track seems popular with runners as no less than 3 set off at the same time as me.
Since jackill's entry, a new track has been cut up through the forest. Starting at point A, continue on the track as far as R86660 52564 starC. The first part involves barely an ascent of 5m over 1km. Turn south here up a rough, steep track, gaining about 70m in height over 500m distance, to R86676 52205 starD where there is a crossroads of sorts. Turn right here (west) and continue along this track all the way to the mast, which is next to a grassy field that holds the trig. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/746/comment/5505/
 
Gortnageragh in May
by oldsoldier  28 May 2010
On Tuesday 26/05/2010 I left Doon and headed for Gortnageragh. I turned right in Doon at the convent and up past the CBS. I followed this road until I came to Curraghmarky bridge. I spoke to the farmer and his family here and got permission to park my cark above his farmhouse. He told me to go past the old house and just at the new one there is a track leading off to the right. I followed this up as far as the forest road. I could have turned right here and reached the mast but I needed a bit of a climb. I turned left when I hit the forest road and turned right soon after up a firebreak, some electric fence on the firebreak. I hit a second firebreak and turned right to the summit and the mast. Had a cup of tea and looked at 5 different counties. An easy walk, but I had just completed foildearg and was now heading for Knocknastanna. I met a sixtynine year old man running around the woods. Took my breath away. well done old timer Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/746/comment/5831/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Gortnageragh (<i>Gort na gCaorach</i>) in area Midlands SW, Ireland
Picture: Cold comforts
Laying down a marker
by Colin Murphy  8 Dec 2022
This is a nice little hill with good tracks most of the way to the summit, which is marked with a trig pillar. I always think it's nice to reach the top and find it marked in some way, either by a trig or cairn. Anyway, I was also fortunate to do this on a crisp, blue sky winter's day, which transformed otherwise ordinary fields of growth into things of beauty. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/746/comment/23771/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Gortnageragh (<i>Gort na gCaorach</i>) in area Midlands SW, Ireland
Picture: Gods Rays on Gortnageragh
 
Climbing Jacobs Ladder
by jackill  7 Dec 2011
Through one thing and another I haven't climbed a new hill or entered a new comment on Mountainviews in several months.After the passing of a dear friend and relative, last Saturday I finally decided to have a go at the final five hills on my local 100 list which was made up of some modest tops in the Shannon region.

The first of the hills to fall was Gortnageragh, an easy walk on a forest track to the summit.
The trig pillar is in a grassy field as you emerge from the forest with a telephone mast nearby.
It was a hazy day but I was happy to capture an image of "Jacobs Ladder".
Crepuscular rays, to give them their proper name, ( also known as God Rays), are rays of sunlight that appear to radiate from a single point in the sky.
These rays, which stream through gaps in cloud cover, are columns of sunlit air separated by darker cloud-shadowed areas. The name comes from their frequent occurrences during crepuscular hours (those around dawn and dusk), when the contrasts between light and dark are the greatest.
Crepuscular comes from the Latin word crepusculum meaning twilight and though it wasn't twilight the overcast day had that feel to it.

Yeats' poem "Into the Twilight" is probably too sentimental and too forlorn
for many but seems to strike the right chord.

"Come, heart, where hill is heaped upon hill:
For there the mystical brotherhood
Of sun and moon and hollow and wood
And river and stream work out their will;

And God stands winding His lonely horn,
And time and the world are ever in flight;
And love is less kind than the grey twilight,
And hope is less dear than the dew of the morn" Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/746/comment/6643/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
(End of comment section for Gortnageragh (Gort na gCaorach).)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
Some mapping:
Open Street Map
(Various variations used.)
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
MountainViews.ie, a Hill-walking Website for the island of Ireland. 2400 Summiteers, 1480 Contributors, maintainer of lists: Arderins, Vandeleur-Lynams, Highest Hundred, County Highpoints etc