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Midlands SW Area , NW: Silvermine Mountains Subarea
Feature count in area: 44, by county: Tipperary: 36, Limerick: 8, OSI/LPS Maps: 52, 53, 54, 58, 59, 60, 65, 66
Highest Place: Keeper Hill 691.6m

Starting Places (31) in area Midlands SW:
Ballincurra Hill South, Ballyhourigan Wood Loop Walk, Barnane Lodge, Castlewaller Wood Forest Road, Coillte Knockanroe, Commanealine Wood, Commaun Beg North, Cullaun South, Cummer South, Curreeny Wood, Doonane Forest Carpark, Foildhine Mulkeir Rivers, Glenaneagh Park, Glenstal Wood CP, Gortagarry Hill West, Greenan Cross, Knockadigeen Hill SW, Knockanora East, Knockanully, Knockaviltoge East, Knockfune Wood Bend, Knockmaroe Wood, Knockmehill South, Knockteige SW, Nicker, Raven's Rock, Ring Hill West, River Doonane, The Lookout, Tobernagreana, Upperchurch

Summits & other features in area Midlands SW:
Cen: Mauherslieve: Cummer 405m, Foilduff 400m, Knockmaroe 411m, Mauherslieve 543m
E: Upperchurch Hills: Knockalough 427m, Knockaviltoge 364m
N: Knockshigowna: Knockshigowna 212m
NE: Devilsbit: Benduff 455m, Black Hill 228m, Devilsbit Mountain 480m, Gortagarry 458m, Kilduff Mountain 445m, Knockanora 433m
NE: Templederry: Ballincurra Hill 403m, Commaun Beg 403m, Cooneen Hill 467m, Coumsallahaun 320m, Knockadigeen Hill 402m
NW: Arra Mountains: Corbally Hill 339m, Tountinna 457m
NW: Silvermine Mountains: Silvermine Mountains East Top 479m, Silvermine Mountains Far East Top 410m, Silvermine Mountains West Top 489m
SE: Hollyford Hills: Falleennafinoga 388m, Foildarg 440m, Glenaneagh 420m, Gortnageragh 418m, Knockastanna 444m, Knockbane 433m, Lackenacreena 413m, Ring Hill 426m, Tooreen 457m
SW: Slieve Felim: Cullaun 460m, Derk Hill 236m, Knockroe 204m, Knockseefin 235m, Slieve Felim 427m, Slieve Felim East Top 423m, Slieve Felim South Top 407m
W: Keeper Hill: Bleanbeg 368m, Boolatin Top 446.6m, Keeper Hill 691.6m, Knockane 411m, Knockfune 452m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Silvermine Mountains West Top, 489m Hill Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar) A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
(Ir. Sliabh an Airgid [logainm.ie], 'mountain of the silver'), Tipperary County in Munster province, in Carn Lists, Silvermine Mountains West Top is the third highest hill in the Midlands SW area and the 601st highest in Ireland.
Grid Reference R82072 69717, OS 1:50k mapsheet 59
Place visited by: 109 members, recently by: BarnabyNutt, jollyrog, Moirabourke, CianDavis, Arcticaurora, Krzysztof_K, johncusack, PrzemekPanczyk, GerSomers, annem, Colin Murphy, markwallace, Taisce, chelman7, maryblewitt
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -8.266532, Latitude: 52.77856, Easting: 182072, Northing: 169717, Prominence: 214m,  Isolation: 1.2km
ITM: 582017 669759
Bedrock type: Red conglomerate, sandstone & mudstone, (Old Red Sandstone (undifferentiated))
Notes on name: A mountain in this vicinity named Mullaghnedryny is mentioned in the Civil Survey of 1654-56 as part of the boundary of the barony of Owney and Arra. It may be this peak or a lower shoulder to the west. The name seems to represent Ir. Mullach na Droighní, 'summit of the blackthorn'. Silvermines is the name of a village (Ir. Béal Átha Gabhann) and parish at the northern foot of these hills. In the 17th century the main road from Dublin to Limerick passed through here, rather than through Nenagh, which was a smaller settlement. There are several old mine buildings and spoil heaps on the northern slopes, reminders of the mining activity which gave these hills their name. Mines yielding silver and lead are first referred to in 1289, see 'The Silver Mines of Ormond' by Dermot F. Gleeson in JRSAI vol. lxvii, 1937, 101-16. Gleeson reports "...that the mines were first opened and worked by members of a colony of Florentine and Genoese merchants to whom many references will be found in the State Papers of the period." Zinc and sulphur were also mined in the area. Gleeson also records the ancient name of the hill behind the mines as Knockaunderrig, now Knockanroe.
  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvrMn, 10 char: SlvrmnMntn

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/489/
Gallery for Silvermine Mountains West Top (Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)) and surrounds
Summary for Silvermine Mountains West Top (Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)): Head west along the road
Summary created by simon3, jackill 2013-08-05 20:43:42
            MountainViews.ie picture about Silvermine Mountains West Top (<em>Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)</em>)
Picture: Looking west towards Silvermines Mtn W Top
Park in the Knockanroe carpark at Coillte Knockanroe (R84440 69415) (388 mtrs) walk into the forestry on a good roadway and take the second left along the crest of the hill. Pass the east summit before a short down/up section to gain the west summit. Excellent views of the whole Shannon region to be had from this easily accessed summit.
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/5248/
Member Comments for Silvermine Mountains West Top (Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar))
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Silvermine Mountains West Top (<em>Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)</em>)
Picture: Sunset from the far end of the ridge with the Arra Mnts in the distance
Dig the View!
by mcrtchly 4 Sep 2010
Silvermines is the site of some of the longest worked mineral deposits in Ireland. The oldest records to mining here date to 1289 when miners from 'Italy' were working the veins. The mines were doubly important being a source of lead (used for roofing especially of the new monastries being built in the C13th) and of silver (for coinage). The working of the mines continued sparadically for the next 6oo years and saw extensive workings in the mid-C19th, the remains of which can be seen in the buildings at Silvermines and Shallee. These include three engine houses which would have contained Cornish beam engines for pumping, winding and crushing. The modern phase of mining began in the 1950's and culminated in the discovery of the massive stratiform lead-zinc-bartye deposit in the mid-1960's which was worked underground and on the surface until 1984. In recent years the legacy of this last phase of mining has been the toxic waste of the tips and tailings ponds.

A walk along the ridge of Silvermines Mountain gives a good overview of the mine workings at the foot of the mountain. Leaving Silvermines village and driving southwards on the minor road we pass the barren landscape of the C19th mine workings before heading steeply uphill. Begining our walk at the entrance to Knockanroe Woods ( Coillte Knockanroe (R84478 69376) ) there is a short detour to the east to bag the disappointing summit of Silvermines far east top. But the main focus of the walk is to head westwards uphill through the forest towards Silvermines East Top. The vista from the summit includes the tips from the C20th mine workings and the now flooded openpit of the Macobar bartye mine.

From the east summit the path now takes a roller coaster down and up steep (but thankfully short) slopes to reach Silvermines West Top. Again there are views of the mines from here but of special note is the main C20th tailings pond which can be seen to the NW on the floor of the plain below. This tailings pond was the source of lead rich dust blows about 10 years ago and now the waste has been stabilised with a new cover to stop the dust.

The ridge continues westwards from the West Top and an enticing summit can be seen about 1km away (A (R80907 69437)). At first this would appear to be a distinct summit which should be included in Mountain Views. However I measured the elevation difference between the col and the summit as only 10m. Thus the western most summit does not have enough prominence to count as a MV summit. Despite its shortcomings of not being a 'summit' we had fantastic views from here to the west across the River Shannon as far as the Arra Mountains and beyond, staying long enough to enjoy the sunset before heading back to the car.

The round trip from the car park at Knockanroe to the west end of the ridge is about 7km and took us 2.5hrs (including the short detour to Far East Summit). Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/6080/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Silvermine Mountains West Top (<em>Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)</em>)
Picture: Misty morning
A gentle walk in the woods (mostly)
by Colin Murphy 17 Oct 2022
Little effort required, certainly in terms of a climb. The start point is at 390m, so other than a bit of up and down along a decent track, you've only got just over 100m ascent over a distance of about 2 and a bit km. Misty most of the way for me, so I can't comment on views. Sun was trying its best to break through, but sadly failed! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/23705/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Silvermine Mountains West Top (<em>Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)</em>)
Picture: 200th top!
200th Top
by paddyhillsbagger 8 May 2010
Silvermines Mtns W was the lucky 200th top for me! Climbed it on a gloriously sunny day after Moylussa circuit and Toutinna so was a little tired and sadly brought no champagne! Actually a lovely hill with splendid views all round. Starting point is Knocknaroe Forest Recreation Area B (R845 695) and there are clear paths courtesy of Coillte. It's taken me over 3 yrs to get to this number having first started with Paddy Dillons book of 2'000ft tops and later branching out to county tops and local hills with MountainViews web site. It's been a very enjoyable journey so far and I'm only half way through the 2'000 footers as well as my local hills! Loads more still to do! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/4690/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Silvermine Mountains West Top (<em>Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)</em>)
Picture: A disused mine building west of Silvermines village
pdtempan on Silvermine Mountains West Top
by pdtempan 20 Mar 2009
Took this snap while passing through, on my way back to Belfast from Kerry. There are several old mine buildings and spoil heaps which are reminders of the mining activity which gave these hills their name. According to a plaque in Silvermines village, the first recorded exploitation of mineral wealth in this area was at the end of the 13th century, when Italian prospectors came from Genoa and Florence. As well as silver, lead and zinc was also mined here. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/3653/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Silvermine Mountains West Top (<em>Sliabh an Airgid (mullach thiar)</em>)
Picture: Keeper Hill from Silvermines
Why no trig or cairn?
by TommyV 1 Nov 2018
From the car park on the road that passes through the Silvermines as mentioned by simon3, there is a nice wood loop walk to the West of here. Halfway around the loop, it's possible to leave the loop at C (R82867 69504) and head West along a defined path for about 1 kilometre to the highest point on the Silvermines. Silvermine West Top is an unmarked height of 489 metres. If time is on your side you can continue on another kilometre over to the unnamed summit as mentioned by mcrtchly. On the more direct route back to the car park you will take in Silvermines East Top if you had taken the lower loop trail on the way out. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/20148/
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