Slievenaglogh 586m mountain, Mourne Mountains Ireland at MountainViews.ie
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Slievenaglogh Mountain Sliabh na gCloch A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh na gCloch [PNNI], 'mountain of the stones/rocks') Down County, in Arderin List, Granite granophyre Bedrock

Height: 586m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J32783 29107
Place visited by 356 members. Recently by: 40Shades, a_whelan99, arderincorbett, TommyMc, p_treanor, ilenia, padstowe, wohfnow, Haulie, marcellawalking, twilawalking, paulbrown, Johnooh, Podgemus, newpark-cc
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -5.966401, Latitude: 54.193801 , Easting: 332783, Northing: 329107 Prominence: 41m,  Isolation: 0.3km
ITM: 732701 829117,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Slvngl, 10 char: Slvnglgh
Bedrock type: Granite granophyre, (Mourne Mountains granite)

This is the higher of two peaks in the Mourne Mountains called Slievenaglogh, the other being situated further south, facing Slieve Binnian across the Silent Valley. This peak is east of Hare's Gap. On the western flanks is a huge granite boulder with a scooped-out face so that it resembles a giant's seat (David Kirk, 'The Mountains of Mourne - A Celebration of a Place Apart', p. 121).   Slievenaglogh is the 322nd highest place in Ireland.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/
COMMENTS for Slievenaglogh 1 2 Next page >>  
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slievenaglogh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Priceless scenery
 
Diamonds aren't always a girl's best friend
by kernowclimber  1 Sep 2010
A steep climb up a series of steps (ouch) from the Hare's Gap to the summit of Slievenaglogh rewards the climber with incredible views over Slieve Bearnagh, Slieve Meelmore and Ben Crom Reservoir. I didn't see any diamonds (not counting the three intrepid souls who, like me, braved this last summit after having been put through our paces by the nimble and very lithe Bleck Cra on Scavvy IV), but the granite weathered and eroded into skeletal-like fingers near the summit was pretty amazing. I never was much for diamonds anyway. Give me a view like this any day... Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/comment/6076/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slievenaglogh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
tsunami on Slievenaglogh, 2005
by tsunami  5 Jun 2005
People disregard Slievenaglogh generally because of its lack of height and challenge to the seasoned hillwalker. But, there is more to keep you interested on this little summit than on many bigger peaks. For one, it is another one of those fantastic windows to the past which the Mournes like to throw at us - much like Meelmore, Donard and the Analong Valley, there is abundant evidence of the work of the mourne stone mason , none more so than a wonderful couple of millstones which never quite made it to the mills despite the obvious hours of effort put into their creation. I say two because I've been told there are - as yet I have only located one (if anyone knows plaes inform me!). The pic shows how Slievenaglogh is a very nice approach to Commedagh especially on the north side of the wall (one of the many mourne wall stiles has been placed just below the summit to make this option easier). Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/comment/1735/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slievenaglogh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: A Boggy Pool on Slievenaglogh
 
CaptainVertigo on Slievenaglogh, 2005
by CaptainVertigo  24 Apr 2005
What the Captain saw when he peered into a stagnant pool on Slievenaglogh on a warm Sunday afternoon in April 2005. Teeming with life, and a sample of Navan Hillwalkers feasting on sweetmeats, caviars and ham sandwiches. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/comment/1659/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slievenaglogh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Bleck Cra on Slievenaglogh, 2005
by Bleck Cra  20 Jan 2005
“Glogh!" It’s like the soft, liquid escape of some spit spirit. Slievenaglogh. From the Trassey or Annalong tracks, a Slieve-ish. From Commedagh and South of the wall, if you’re dreaming, you’ll miss it. North of the wall if you’re dreaming, your family will miss YOU. Last Sunday was a “why” day - blustering squalls and buckshot rain. “Why?” we grin manically, plodding knee-deep in black bog. A saunter off Commedagh for no good reason (like the saunter on) - sure you couldn’t see your eyes. A propos de fell runners …. there are some things I don’t get: mountain biking (up the way) heads the list, a woman witnessed pushing a pram up Beinn Lomond comes a close second, walking poles fight for third and fell running …... To be honest, it irks me that I’ll never be up to it, as long as there’s French wine and Italian food. But so many grey, drawn faces and the conviction that gravity CAN and WILL be beaten. The only boy beats gravity is Mr Crow and one day you may meet for dinner. But to Slieve of the Glogh. Little to make song and dance about, other than the fabulous Diamond Rocks - one of these odd Mournes volcanic pillar jobs, like the Castles on Commedagh and the Back Castles on Binnian, ‘cept this time underfoot! On a fat, lazy, confident ridge, they come as a complete shock and if you’re snoozing, will give you wobbly legs. Suddenly soft moss and indolent burnt bog defer to precipitous breath-taking drops and you have to shake the lemming genes out of your system. There are various ways off her, but clatter on to Hares Gap, this time South of the wall or you’ll join the diners therein….., from above. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/comment/1429/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slievenaglogh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Slievenaglogh
 
mneary34 on Slievenaglogh, 2005
by mneary34  17 Oct 2005
Slievenaglogh when heading west towards it from Slieve Corragh is arrived at quite quickly and opens up great aspects to Slieve Bearnagh and Slieve Meelmore. This is the view from Slieve Corragh to Slievenaglogh Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/comment/2006/
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Eastern Mournes Hike
by hbowman1  18 Sep 2011
I climbed this mountain yesterday as part of an A to B circuit walk. Starting off from Meelmore Lodge, we headed toward Slieve Meelmore via Spellack. The path is steep in places but upon summitting Spellack, very fine views opened up towards the Hares Gap and eastern Mournes. We continued toward the summit of Meelmore and then descended to the saddle between Bernagh and Meelmore. After lunch we followed a path around Bernagh to the Hares Gap. After a short break, we followed the Mourne wall towards Commedagh, passing Slievenaglogh and Slieve Corragh en route. Nice views were to be had of Bernagh, Binnian, Lamagan, Cove, Beg, Ben Crom, Doan, Muck and Slieve Croob. Upon summitting Commedagh we descended the ridge towards Slievenamaddy via Shanslieve. I would not attempt this in poor visibility as the gradient is steep in places. However, in good conditions, I would strongly recommend this walk. The view towards Newcastle and Murlough bay from Shanslieve, I think, is one of the best in the Mournes. We continued our descent towards Slievenamaddy before travering through Donard Forest, finishing in Donard car park. The full walk is 14km and took 6.75 hours. Highlights of this walk would include the views from Spellack towards Hares Gap, views from Slieve Corragh of Ben Crom reservoir, the views near Commedagh of Cascade River Valley and, above all, views of Newcastle from Shanslieve. The last section of Commedagh, Shanslieve and Slievenamaddy also offers a very nice alternative to the traditional Glen River valley. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/304/comment/6517/
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