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Cooley Mountains Area   S: Cooley South Subarea
Place count in area: 12, OSI/LPS Maps: 29, 36 
Highest place:
Slieve Foye, 589m
Maximum height for area: 589 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 494 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Slieve Foye Mountain Sliabh Feá A name in Irish, also Carlingford Mountain an extra name in English (Ir. Sliabh Feá [GE], 'mountain of rushes') County Highpoint of Louth in Leinster Province, in County Highpoint, Arderin Lists, Undifferentiated, or layered gabbro 1-4 Bedrock

Height: 589m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29&36A Grid Reference: J16902 11934
Place visited by 684 members. Recently by: Gordonaplace, landyliam, deirdremaryann, Haulie, NMangan, Caherdavin1995, ConMack23, TippClimbers, arthurdoylephoto, annem, SeanPurcell, Jai-mckinney, Oscar-mckinney, doopa, thmswhelan
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.216215, Latitude: 54.043405 , Easting: 316902, Northing: 311934 Prominence: 494m,  Isolation: 0.8km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 716824 811942,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvFy, 10 char: SlvFoye
Bedrock type: Undifferentiated, or layered gabbro 1-4, (Layered Gabbro)

Locally the name is understood as Sliabh Fathaigh, 'mountain of the giant', and this ties in with local lore about a giant being discernible among the summit rocks [KM, personal comment]. Also called Carlingford Mountain.   Slieve Foye is the highest mountain in the Cooley Mountains area and the 317th highest in Ireland. Slieve Foye is the second most easterly summit in the Cooley Mountains area. Slieve Foye is the highest point in county Louth.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/
COMMENTS for Slieve Foye (Sliabh Feá) << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 6 .. 9 Next page >>  
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Foye (<i>Sliabh Feá</i>) in area Cooley Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Lower Slopes of Slieve Foye from Carlingford Village.
 
mneary34 on Slieve Foye, 2005
by mneary34  27 Oct 2005
On 22nd October 2005 myself and Tom Milligan set out on a sunny morning to traverse the Cooleys from Carlingford village to Black Mountain and back. We parked in the tourist office car park in the village, walked through the village and took the northern headed Tain Trail. We departed from the trail on the left hand side of the wood shown in the photo which is the southern side of the wood. From there it is a steep direct climb to the summit and some scrambling is required if the line is to be maintained, so it is a route that may not suit everybody. Due to low cloud and poor visibility a bearing had to be taken to take us along the ridge past Eagle Rock and at J 157 136 A we changed direction and headed for Windy Gap. A combination of compass guidance and GPS 'Go to' took us from there although between The Split Rock and Ravens Rock all cleared and the wood south of Windy Gap came into view. We headed along its north eastern side and then descended along its northern side towards Windy Gap. This descent beside the Wood is steep and I would think especially in damp wet conditions should be avoided. We arrived at Windy Gap after a climb along this segment of the walk of 700 metres and 7 k in 2 hours 40 minutes. See Black Mountain for a continuation of the trek. In the attached photo the top of the forest is at the 250 metre contour and the top of the visible mountain is at 400 metres approx so there is another 200 metres approx covered in cloud. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/2021/
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three5four0 on Slieve Foye, 2008
by three5four0  8 Oct 2008
Traverse of the Cooley Mountains
For those wishing to do this superb traverse, as outline by ahendroff, but with out access to two cars, read on! I travelled to Newry by Ulsterbus from Belfast, took a taxi ride from Newry Bus Station, (the taxi depot is just opposite the station) to the start point of ahendroff's walk (Point A). The Taxi driver was quite happy to drive his taxi up the winding minor roads for a fare of £6. I left Newry at 10:00 am and finished the traverse with around only 10 minutes to spare & no time for a pint before the 17:10 bus (this is the last bus for Newry on Saturdays) left Carlingford for Newry and my onward connection to Belfast. But with good connections with Belfast & Dublin, an earlier start than mine is easily achieved, and a leisurely pint can be supped before your departure home. Here are the web links to the Bus company's timetables, www.buseireann.ie/pdf/12 0 248 21 56-161.pdf www.translink.co.uk/ . And while you sup your pint, you can feel extra smug at a superb hill traverse, your use of public transport and the low carbon footprint for the days travels. I think that you may feel you deserve a second pint for that and why not! Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/3363/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Foye (<i>Sliabh Feá</i>) in area Cooley Mountains, Ireland
tsunami on Slieve Foye, 2005
by tsunami  11 Jan 2005
Foye (left) and Barnavave (right) as seen from Cooley on a fine summer morning. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/1418/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Foye (<i>Sliabh Feá</i>) in area Cooley Mountains, Ireland
 
csd on Slieve Foye, 2004
by csd  17 Mar 2004
The summit ridge of Slieve Foye is a collection of rocky outcrops and boggy dips, and around each corner is a breathtaking vista in all directions. The picture shows one of the many small ponds and rocky outcrops near the summit, with the view north to the Mournes visible through the gap. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/893/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Foye (<i>Sliabh Feá</i>) in area Cooley Mountains, Ireland
csd on Slieve Foye, 2004
by csd  17 Mar 2004
This, I presume, is why the area is called Split Rock. The one of the streams running down the western flank of Slieve Foye has carved a channel perhaps five metres deep into the surrounding boggy grassland. You don't notice the fissure in the ground until you're almost upon it. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/894/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Foye (<i>Sliabh Feá</i>) in area Cooley Mountains, Ireland
Picture: My daughter close to the summit
 
paulocon on Slieve Foye, 2008
by paulocon  19 Oct 2008
Nursing a slight hangover and having being persuaded by my youngest daughter to take her to another mountain, we paid a visit to Slieve Foye on Saturday afternoon. From Carlingford, the mountain is an impressive and imposing sight. The cloud cover that had been apparent as we made out way down the M1 had dissipated by the time were in the village. We started our ascent from the car-park of Slieve Foye forest park (around 2kms out the Omeath road). After going over the stile, you are straight into a fairly steep ascent pretty much all the way up to Eagles rock. The views across Carlingford Lough and onto the slopes of the Mountains of Mourne are simply fantastic with the patchwork of fields being lit sporadically as the sun peaked out from behind the clouds. Swinging left here, we walked along a marshy flat ridge until we came to the stream at which point we started up the mountain again. There's no obvious trail so we picked our own way up. Close to the top, my daughter tired so we choose a large flat stone as a picnic location. I had a quick look over the top of a steep hill in front of us from where I could see the trig point. Followed the same patch back down, note that it's very wet and slippy in places so caution is needed. All in all, a good walk which is challenging in places - just beware the wet ground which I imagine will be treacherous going into the winter. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/3392/
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