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Mourne Mountains Area
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Slieve Beg Mountain Sliabh Beag A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh Beag [PNNI], 'little mountain') Down County, in Arderin List, Granite granophyre Bedrock

Height: 595.9m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J34046 27603
Place visited by 334 members. Recently by: Aidy, annieipa, Podgemus, Xiom5724, windy, DeltaP, newpark-cc, msammon, Reeks2011, atlantic73, cathalferris, GSheehy, LorraineG60, LorraineG, David-Guenot
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -5.947707, Latitude: 54.179924 , Easting: 334047, Northing: 327604 Prominence: 40.87m,  Isolation: 0.6km
ITM: 733966 827609,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvBg, 10 char: Slieve Beg
Bedrock type: Granite granophyre, (Mourne Mountains granite)

The most notable feature of Slieve Beg is the scree-run known as the Devil's Coachroad which dissects its eastern flank.   Slieve Beg is the 299th highest place in Ireland.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/?PHPSESSID=qr9fauvkd349kh5qaroqqg7411
COMMENTS for Slieve Beg << Prev page 1 2 3
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Donard framed by the Devils Coachroad
 
Well worth a visit
by paulocon  10 Jan 2011
Beg is a handy wee dander from the Brandy Pad. For me, it was a stop off point before heading up the punishing incline for Cove. First time seeing the very impressive coachroad abd I have to say I felt uneasy just looking down into it - fair play to all those who have scrambled up it. Well worth a visit. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/6201/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
tsunami on Slieve Beg, 2004
by tsunami  19 Nov 2004
A similar view to Ricky K's showing the severity of the scree slope forming the Coachroad. Bearnagh cuts an imposing figure in the background, yet somehow seems incredibly inviting to all who view her. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/1332/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
 
ricky k on Slieve Beg, 2004
by ricky k  19 Nov 2004
Slieve Beg, November 04. Brrrrrrrrrr. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/1333/
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bigphil99 on Slieve Beg, 2003
by bigphil99  22 Jun 2003
Up the annalong valley and climbed the devils coachroad. Good steep climb/ scramble through the devils coachroad and great view at the top. Back over cove mountain. Showery day with driving rain at times making the coachroad all the more interesting. Not a route for novices or young children/ groups Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/555/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Scavenging in the lower section of the Coachroad
The Devil Wears Scarpa
by Peter Walker  20 Aug 2012
Slieve Beg would be little more than an incidental top on the spine of the Mournes climaxing in Slieve Binnian were it not for the impressive eastern ramparts and the dramatic rent of the Devil's Coachroad, into whose depths many summiteers have gazed in awe.

An ascent of the Coachroad is actually a feasible undertaking for most non-nervous hillwalkers: what looks very testing in theory turns out to be fairly reasonable in practice, with the terrain requiring more clambering than actual scrambling. It's best approached by continuing a little past it on the walk up the Annalong Valley, before cutting back and contouring to its base (a direct approach looks purgatorial). Anyone comfortable with the level of exposure experienced at the foot of the gully will not be troubled any further during the actual ascent.

The initial ascent into the jaws of the Coachroad is up a steep and shifting slope: if you are not alone you will need to take care to avoid dislodging stones and to avoid any which may have been dislodged by others. Soon the walls close in and after more loose scree the route is split by a rib of rock in the floor of the gully. Ongoing passage can be accomplished on either side of this, with the odd fairly straightforward (and secure) thrutching/bridging scrambling move required. At the end of the rib is the slightly gritty headwall: I'm reliably informed that it's easier to tread right (looking up) to climb this but I found the swarm up the left hand side quite easy too. It's short-lived anyway, and debouches directly onto the summit.

A descent is feasible, but is probably better left to previous ascentionists. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/14764/
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COMMENTS for Slieve Beg << Prev page 1 2 3
(End of comment section for Slieve Beg.)

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