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Dartry Mountains Area , N: Truskmore Subarea
Feature count in area: 31, by county: Leitrim: 22, Sligo: 10, of which 1 is in both Sligo and Leitrim, OSI/LPS Maps: 16, 17, 25, 26
Highest Place: Truskmore 647m

Starting Places (22) in area Dartry Mountains:
Aghavoghil Middle, Arroo Trail CP, Ballaghnatrillick, Ballintrillick Forest, Barrs East, Castletown, Crumpaun, Curraghan Road, Dough Mountain NW, Dough Mountain West, Drumcliff River Road, Eagles Rock, Edenbaun, Glencar Waterfall, Gleniff Horseshoe Road, Lough Cloonaquin North, Luke's Bridge, Mountain Wood, Poulveha River, Thur East, Tormore Car Park, Truskmore Transmitter Entrance

Summits & other features in area Dartry Mountains:
N: Truskmore: Gortnagarn 445m, Tievebaun 611m, Truskmore 647m, Truskmore SE Cairn 631m
NE: Arroo Keeloges: Aganny Top 482m, Aghalateeve 432m, Agow Top 423m, Arroo Mountain 523m, Conwal North 421m, Crocknagapple 372m, Keeloges 452m
NW: Benbulbin: Annacoona Top 597m, Benbulbin 526m, Benwiskin 514m, Benwiskin South Top 508m, Kings Mountain 462m
SE: Manorhamilton Hills: Ballaghnabehy Top 413m, Benbo 415m, Dough Mountain 462m, Lackagh Mountain 449m, Larkfield 305m, Naweeloge Top 441m, Thur Mountain 442m
SW: Castlegal Hills: Copes Mountain 452m, Crockauns 463m, Hangmans Hill 400m, Keelogyboy Mountain 438m, Keelogyboy Mountain Far East Top 418m, Keelogyboy Mountain NE Top 435m, Keelogyboy Mountain SW Top 417m, Leean Mountain 417m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Truskmore, 647m Mountain Trosc Mór A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
Ir. Trosc Mór [OSI], poss. 'big barren/rocky hill’ [PDT] County Highpoint of Sligo in Connacht province, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam Lists, Truskmore is the highest mountain in the Dartry Mountains area and the 206th highest in Ireland. Truskmore is the highest point in county Sligo.
Grid Reference G75899 47348, OS 1:50k mapsheet 16
Place visited by: 471 members, recently by: rhw, purpleknight, Overarroo, discovering_dann, orlaithfitz, BarnabyNutt, Carolineswalsh, knightsonhikes, nolo, JordanF1, MarionP, edowling, Tuigamala, Buckz, ToughSoles
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -8.371608, Latitude: 54.374217, Easting: 175899, Northing: 347348, Prominence: 560m,  Isolation: 0.5km, Has trig pillar
ITM: 575855 847349
Bedrock type: Pale orthoquartzitic sandstone, (Glenade Sandstone Formation)
Notes on name: The summit, which is the highest point in Co. Sligo, is surmounted by a TV mast. An access road climbs to the mast from Gleniff. There is a small but widespread group of place-names containing the element trosc in the counties along the western and northern coasts of Ireland. P.W. Joyce explained these with the word trosc meaning ‘cod’ (fish), either from a fancied resemblance of the hill’s profile to the shape of a cod, or from the prevalence of cod in the nearby seas (INP iii 586). However, neither of these explanations stand up to scrutiny. The fifteen different hills and townlands involved present a variety of quite different shapes, such as cones or flattened piles, which seems to rule out a resemblance to a fish. Some examples are 15km or more inland, making an illusion to rich fishing grounds unlikely. It seems more likely that trosc is simply an ancient Irish word for a hill which is steep and/or rocky, a word which now only survives in this group of place-names. It is also possible that the word denotes unproductive land which is poor, even for sheep grazing. It may well consist of tor, ‘rock’, metathesised to tro- and combined with the suffix -sc. Truskmore is quite rocky in parts and the land is rough pasture.
  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: Trskmr, 10 char: Truskmore

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/201/
Gallery for Truskmore (Trosc Mór) and surrounds
Summary for Truskmore (Trosc Mór): The Height of Sligo
Summary created by simon3, Peter Walker 2017-01-23 09:22:49
            MountainViews.ie picture about Truskmore (<em>Trosc Mór</em>)
Picture: Truskmore from the head of Gleniff
The Dartry Mountains are among the most distinctive in Ireland, so it's unfortunate that their highest hill is one of the least distinctive in the range. Once one gets away from the signature steep lower slopes the upper reaches are lacking in interest save for the expansive views and the crowning RTE transmitting contraptions. This is the highest top in Sligo, and the highest point in Leitrim also resides on its summit slopes.

The most straightforward route of ascent follows the access road to said transmitters which snakes up from the head of Gleniff to the north starting at ( Trusk Trans (G744 468)); parking is available but very limited hereabouts. More judgment is required in approaching from Glencar to the south; starting from the car park 200m west of the Glencar Waterfall (A (G756 436)) follow the track winding north through the trees to the top of the escarpment, forking right at a junction and then making your own way across the plateau to Truskmore, where the RTE station will be obvious in good conditions.

Please note that access in this area has been historically poor; that situation has improved in recent years, but it goes without saying that cars should be parked with due regard to the needs of the locals. People accessing from B (G788 476) and the E or NE side of the summit have reported antagonistic access issues.
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/201/comment/4961/
Member Comments for Truskmore (Trosc Mór)

            MountainViews.ie picture about Truskmore (<em>Trosc Mór</em>)
Access update 18 Feb 2018 from carpark at IG78210 48924
by ColinCallanan 18 Feb 2018
I had intended to summit Tievebaun and/or Truskmore, and had also hoped to check out "Eagles rock" using the car park as a start point at I EglRk (G78210 48924), so I proceeded to park my car at this official "Eagles rock" car park.

I heard a quickly approaching quad as I was driving in, and after reading all of the reports here about angry farmers and difficulties between walkers and local landowners, I decided right away to stop my car, get out and approach the man with a friendly attitude and introduce myself. The man was a local farmer, and after explaining to him that I was there to do some walking with my partner to enjoy the lovely weather and mountains, he responded in a friendly manner but informed us that the amazing rock formation we were looking at was not, in fact, really eagles rock at all. The information on the car park information board was misleading he said, and that eagles rock is not the impressive structure in the information photo. He pointed out a much smaller rock (see my track for photos here: https://mountainviews.ie/track/3725/ ). The track from the "Eagles rock" car park leads all the way up to this rock.

The man advised us that we could park in the carpark and take the path up this this smaller rock without any trouble. He said the neighboring farmer was very contrary, and didn't like people anywhere near his land. We said we might consider continuing on to summit Tievebaun and/or Truskmore from there also, and to this the man advised that it would be fine to do this also and there is a way up. He didn't seem to express any fears about land access, so I'm assuming he owned this part of the land and perhaps was quite friendly towards walkers. We were told that cars had their windows smashed in this carpark, but thankfully I drive an old banger so I wasn't very worried about this.

We found the track up to the smaller "eagles rock" was very good, and would be suitable for families. It gets very muddy just before you get to the rock, and you'll need to fence hop a bit to get into the rock itself and climb it. Views are incredible all around.

For summiting Truskmore and Tievebaun from this location, see my track here: https://mountainviews.ie/track/3725 Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/201/comment/19856/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Truskmore (<em>Trosc Mór</em>)
Picture: Slieve League (background) and Benwiskin (foreground) from near the summit of Truskmore
murphysw on Truskmore
by murphysw 3 Jun 2007
Due to the apparent problems described here by other users with regard to access, I too took the TV road to the summit. Even as TV roads go its a bit unwelcoming compared to Mt. Leinster or Kippure. Parking is restrictive, you have to leave your car propped up against a ditch on a narrow road, its hard to enjoy a walk when your car is left somewhat exposed! The views are amazing though, you can even see across to the sea cliffs of Slieve League! I didn't encounter anyone on my quick power walk to the top (I wanted to get back to the car!!!). The summit cairn can be found by walking between the two sections of the TV buildings at the top. Its a pity about the access problems as this is one of the most unusual and visually stunning areas in Ireland. Even on the loop road up to the gates of the TV road, no trespass signs are much in evidence Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/201/comment/2722/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Truskmore (<em>Trosc Mór</em>)
Picture: Lenghts of falling ice faintly visible through the fog.
wicklore on Truskmore
by wicklore 1 Feb 2010
One of the things I’ve noticed when climbing hills with masts or wind turbines on top are the signs that warn of the danger of ice falling from them. I have never really needed to pay much attention to those signs until yesterday.

I was walking up the access road up to Truskmore. At the beginning of the road was a sign warning people to stay 200 metres from the mast due to the possibility of falling ice. There was relatively heavy snow lying on the ground, particularly above 200 metres. For the couple of hours that I was on the mountain there was frequent falls of snow and the temperature was freezing. Near the summit visibility was down to less than 50 metres, as snow and fog combined to create a blanket of white all around. As I neared the summit I heard a repeated cracking sound, which at first I thought was gunfire. But knew there couldn’t be hunters out in these conditions. Each cracking sound would be followed seconds after by either a ‘whumph’ or a banging sound. I reached a gate at the summit and the massive guy wires supporting the mast materialised. Mine were the only footprints in the blanket of snow, but I was puzzled by dozens of other random scuff marks in the snow. Just as I realised that I must be well within the 200 metre danger zone I discovered what all the noise was, and what the marks were. Large sections of ice were falling from the guy wires and mast. That accounted for the cracking sound, as the wind ripped the ice off. The heaviest lumps of ice fell straight down onto the roof of the building below, with the expected crashing sound. Smaller pieces were carried by the wind away from the mast where they landed on the snow. The impact resulted in the ‘whumph’ sound and caused the random scuff marks I had noticed.

Just as I realised all of this I was hit be some minor pieces of ice – larger than hailstones, but not big enough to hurt. I retreated rapidly to where only the smallest lumps of ice were landing. The massive mast was hidden in the freezing fog, and it was eerie listening to the sound of cracking and falling ice emanating from the whiteness around me. I had my camera out but knew that photographing fog was useless. As if sensing my wish to be able to see what was going on, the cloud magically lifted for a moment and revealed the frozen mast. As I took my photograph I witnessed a large length of ice plummet from the heights. It must have been 12 feet long and it split into several pieces as it fell. The majority of it went straight down, but the wind carried several pieces straight in my direction. I beat a hasty retreat and didn’t look back as I heard the ice impacting in the snow behind me. I will certainly be much more wary of the possibility of falling ice for the remainder of the winter! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/201/comment/4382/
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Alternative Route to mast road
by Eamonn96 28 Apr 2011
This mountain can also be accessed by following the Doenen Walk which starts near Glencar until it's end and crossing bog and hills (Its quite tiring) until you reach the summit using the Mast to guide us. Be careful to avoid bog holes and the ground under other less dry weather could be challenging. I would advise that this route not be taken alone as it is quite remote but spectacular. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/201/comment/6322/
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More welcoming than expected
by AdrianneB 4 Aug 2011
Although most of this area has poor access, due to landowners not welcoming walkers, I had a great experience today. Went for a run up Truskmore after work using the RTE mast access road. Had to climb the gate with all the signs on it, figuring they wouldn't be working after 6pm. It was really windy with dense cloud at the top, out of the gloom came an RTE engineer in his jeep, scaring the life out of me. He gave me a big wave and we both went on our way. As I was climbing back over the gate to my car I spotted a note on my windscreen, thought it might be a note about access or rights of way. But no it said "Well done! Not an easy run" Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/201/comment/6461/
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British summit data courtesy:
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