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Cuilcagh 665m, Benbeg 539m,
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3180, 5km
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Breifne Area   Cuilcagh Mountains Subarea
Place count in area: 14, OSI/LPS Maps: 26, 27, 27A 
Highest place:
Cuilcagh, 665m
Maximum height for area: 665 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 570 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Cuilcagh Mountain Binn Chuilceach A name in Irish
(Ir. Binn Chuilceach [DUPN], 'chalky peak') County Highpoint of Cavan & Fermanagh, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Cyclothemic sandstone, siltstone, coal Bedrock

Height: 665m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 26 Grid Reference: H12356 28017
Place visited by 422 members. Recently by: doogleman, jmcg, cactustravelfan, conororourke, IndyMan, dunphymgt, livelife2thefull, Pikes, Gus, Andy1287, Grumbler, nupat, m0jla, Krumel, mallymcd
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Longitude: -7.811428, Latitude: 54.201026 , Easting: 212356, Northing: 328017 Prominence: 570m,  Isolation: 2.6km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 612303 828028,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Clcgh, 10 char: Cuilcagh
Bedrock type: Cyclothemic sandstone, siltstone, coal, (Lackagh Sandstone Formation)

Cuilcagh lies on the Shannon-Erne watershed. The Shannon rises on the north-western slopes of Cuilcagh at Shannon Pot, a steep-sided pool where the underground river emerges. Strictly speaking, there are streams a mile or two further uphill. Originating in Ulster, the Shannon’s journey through this province lasts less than ten miles, before it enters Connacht. It forms the boundary between Connacht and Leinster for much of its length, and ultimately meets the sea in the province of Munster. Thus it is both a boundary and a link between all four provinces of Ireland. In fact, it even formed the western boundary of the ancient fifth province of Meath. Around Cuilcagh there is a belief concerning the ‘Northern Shannon’, an underground river that supposedly connects the waters at Shannon Pot to the River Claddagh, which emerges at Marble Arch Caves and then flows into the Erne. If Cuilceach genuinely is a variant of cailceach, 'chalky', the name is rather puzzling, as the mountain consists predominantly of sandstone and shale, covered with much bog and heather. Where the rock does outcrop, as at the summit cliffs, it is mainly grey. However, it is possible that the name refers to the limestone rock on the lower northern flanks. Here a number of streams disappear below ground at swallow holes named Cats Hole, Pollawaddy, Pollasumera and Polliniska, all forming part of the Marble Arch cave system. If so, the name would mean 'calcareous' rather than 'chalky'.   Cuilcagh is the highest mountain in the Breifne area and the 169th highest in Ireland. Cuilcagh is the highest point in county Cavan and also the highest in Fermanagh.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Cuilcagh in area Breifne, Ireland
Picture: Cuilcagh Legnabrocky Trail
 
-Legnabrocky Trail
by paddyobpc  24 Jan 2017
Walk Date: 06 Jun 2016. The previous day Dillon(dillonkdy), my sister Helen and I had climbed Truskmore, Truskmore SE Cairn and Seltannasaggart SE Slope. After a rest overnight in Drumshanbo we now had our sights set on Cuilcagh to tick Fermanagh and Cavan off the list of CHP’s. We headed to the Fermanagh side of the mountain near the “Marble Arch Caves” to use the beautiful Cuilcagh Legnabrocky Trail. It really is as impressive as it looks in the pictures and we were again blessed with the weather all the way to the summit and most of the way down. The views and scenery on this walk are outstanding and the boulders as you walk to the summit after the main climb are unusual and amazing too. On two occasions we had to shelter from some violent Thunder and Lightning storms before we returned to the car but luckily we were not stuck near the summit when this happened. Dillon (dillonkdy) was glad to be back to the car from this one. Up and back we covered 14 km, a height gain of 470m taking us almost 5 hours including our stops from the weather. See Dillon’s (dillonkdy) full story of his County High Point Challenge at https://dillons32chpchallenge.github.io/progress/index.html We also found Kieron Gribbon's High Point Ireland website (www.highpointireland.com) to be a useful source of information for our 32 County High Points challenge. Definitely worth checking out if you're planning to do any of the High Point challenges. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/18813/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Cuilcagh in area Breifne, Ireland
rowanseymour on Cuilcagh, 2004
by rowanseymour  10 Mar 2004
The impressive cliffs on the north (climbed in summer from the north). Interesting mountain with lots of limestone "holes" to fall into... Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/889/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Cuilcagh in area Breifne, Ireland
 
MadFrankie on Cuilcagh, 2003
by MadFrankie  9 Jan 2003
The approach from the south Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/302/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Cuilcagh in area Breifne, Ireland
Picture: OSNI Bench Mark on the trig pillar at the summit of Cuilcagh
csd on Cuilcagh, 2006
by csd  22 Oct 2006
Cuilcagh marks the border between the Republic and the North, and has an OSNI trig pillar atop its cairn. I approached from Benbeg, to the south, and the terrain reminded me a lot of the section between Mullaghcleevaun and Tonlagee in Wicklow: very boggy, lots of peat hags, a ridge off to one side.
As the weather once again takes a turn for the worst as autumn and winter approach, it's perhaps a good idea to remind everyone of the importance of careful navigation, especially in an area like this. Having bagged 140 unique peaks in Ireland in the last five years I'm not exactly a newbie, but in the fog and maze of peat hags between Benbeg and Cuilcagh I went off track twice by up to 90 degrees. It's quite a shock to pull out the GPS and compass and find you've been confidently marching in completely the wrong direction for the past two minutes! Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/2528/
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absalon on Cuilcagh, 2007
by absalon  26 Jun 2007
In answer to robocaver's query re plaque on Cuilcagh ridge,it marks a point on the Caslin Way & gives bearings for Cuilceagh ,Binn Breac,Sliabh na Cille & Tiltinbane. The walk which almost circumnavigates the valley of Glengevlin begins with Slna Cille proceeding to the 3 lakes ( Altshallan,na mbreac & Knockgorm),next to Muntereolas lough,over Moneensaurin(463 on OS,BinnBreac W in MV)to Cloch na Coimirce(415 on OS),toBinn Breac &the Scalp(B.Breac NE in MV);then descend to cross the road at Bellavalley gap & proceed up to Binnbeg & along the ridge to Cuilcagh summit;from there continue on the ridge to Tiltinbane passing the aforementioned plaque on the way.The descent is to the townland of Eshveagh striking a road at H076280 A. A strenuous walk but if you enjoy the unspoiled & uncharted wilderness of west Cavan you won't begrudge the fever & the sweat. The plaque was erected in summer 06 to celebrate a birthday of veteran hillwalker Tom Caslin. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/2757/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Cuilcagh in area Breifne, Ireland
Picture: The boulder pile
 
A tilt at Tiltinbane
by Alaskan  12 Jun 2010
The name was enigmatic - Tiltinbane. I thought I’d go see what it looked like so I drove to the north side of Cuilcagh and hiked up the Legnabrocky trail. It was a pleasantly gloomy day with a few solar amoebas scampering about playfully, or they did for a while until their parents called them home, leaving me to ascend with just the pleasantly gloomy for company. Shortly before the steep part, I hopped over to Lough Atona, walked along its edge, then tried to see how many thinly-covered holes I could find with my legs in the monster boulder piles that infest the slopes below the cliffs. Finding more than I liked, I began looking for an escape route through the capping cliffs. It was the sheep that finally showed me that Cuilcagh’s cliffs were not as impregnable as they appeared. Reaching the infinitely-long summit ridge that stretches from Tiltinbane to Cuilcagh, I began hiking along the cliff’s edge. - only to be blocked by a series of gaping fissures. It seems that the quartzite cliffs atop the ridge have developed an intense desire to join their cousins, the boulders, down below and are busily breaking away from mother earth. The red fox liked the many dark holes in the crevice bottom, however. Extricating myself from the network of fissures, I soon found myself on the summit of Tiltinbane. A conveniently eroded rock provided me with a seat at its apex where I could contemplate the enigma of Tiltinbane - why does such an innocuous lump at the end of a long ridge even have a name? Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/5872/
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