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Derryveagh Mountains Area   N: Muckish Subarea
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Muckish Mountain An Mhucais A name in Irish (Ir. An Mhucais [DUPN], 'the pig back/ridge') Donegal County in Ulster Province, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Whitish quarztite with pebble beds Bedrock

Height: 667.1m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 2 Grid Reference: C00448 28709
Place visited by 411 members. Recently by: derekfanning, Jimmy600leavey, AlanReid, walkingireland, Ianhhill, mrfleetfoot, johnlyster, Cathal-Kelly, Frankierooney, Juanita, tphase, garv60, ConMack23, k_der, Haulie
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -7.993765, Latitude: 55.105634 , Easting: 200448, Northing: 428709 Prominence: 523.08m,  Isolation: 3.2km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 600397 928691,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Mcksh, 10 char: Muckish
Bedrock type: Whitish quarztite with pebble beds, (Ards Quartzite Formation)

So named from a fancied resemblance according to Joyce. The mountain does indeed have the shape of a pig's back, with a curve before a steep downward drop on the S side. A quarry on the N side of the mountain was used to extract high-grade quartz sand for optical glass.   An Mhucais is the third highest mountain in the Derryveagh Mountains area and the 164th highest in Ireland.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Muckish (<i>An Mhucais</i>) in area Derryveagh Mountains, Ireland
 
gerrym on Muckish, 2006
by gerrym  2 Jan 2006
Muckish is an incredibly distinct mountain and one I have longed to climb for a number of years - cue last Sunday and a 2 hour drive from Antrim. Access is via N56 from Letterkenny and a turn left after Creeslough onto a road which heads direct for the mountain. When taramc ends there is room for several cars to park at the side of the road. Continue along the now gravel track as winds uphill through turf cuttings and moorland in varying shades of brown. The impressive northern buttresses of Muckish loom overhead as the track peters out at the head of the old quarry workings, where concrete platforms and rusting plant are the less visible scars of the quarrying operation. Follow path across stream and uphill into the ampitheatre of crags and buttresses. There is a set of wooden steps which lead to more difficult walking as skirt and negoiate rockfaces (hands will be needed). Unfortunately we lost the track here and continued uphill by way of a narrow gulley which entailed scrambling up rocks passing wooden remains of quarrying operation, heading for the winches above. A word of caution - there is quite alot of loose rock and one of my companions had a lucky escape when a substancial rockface gave way in front of him. He was pulled to one side or he would have been bouncing down the gulley along with football sized rocks. When reach winches are at the quarry itself (see pic looking down). This is a marvel at this height, just below the summit, with an extensive level area which has been quarried backed by high walls. There is an excavator with rubber tyres and an old bogey among the traces of white sand that was so precious at the time. Return to and follow the path left as rises above the quarry onto the rocky summit plateau, passing small cairns on way to trig pillar at 666m on NE of mountain. There is a large tethered cross on a cairn further NE which was erected in 2000 according to the plaque. Great views N and E over headlands and beaches towards Inishowen. To the west the Sperrins can be seen clearly and as track south over summit plateau Dooish and Slieve Snaght are backed by the Bluestack Mountains. Head SW to reach massive burial cairn in centre of plateau and continue further for views of Aglas and Errigal. There are a number of small cairns here and a perfect igloo shaped stone shelter with doorway. Headed NW here to descend the western shoulder of the mountain. This is quite an easy descent over rocky ground which becomes more heather as descend. At foot of mountain track east to rejoin the gravel road which will return to the car - all the while being drawn to look up at the imposing rock faces. Took around 4 hours in all and was more of a challenge on way up than i would have thought. There were a few other people about at the bottom but no one else up top when we were there.Visited the excellent beach at Dunfanaghy which is nearby before returning home and Muckish is a true monster dominating the skyline from here. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/comment/1239/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Muckish (<i>An Mhucais</i>) in area Derryveagh Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Trig With Cairn and Errigal in Background
dino on Muckish, 2008
by dino  21 Sep 2008
I really enjoyed this mountain. I've been past it more times than I can count but it was always shrouded in mist or low cloud. Today was the first really good day in ages and the first time I've seen Muckish clear. I hadn't actually intended to climb today and had instead planned on a trip over to Tory. However, I messed up reading the timetable and left myself with a day to fill. What better time to try Muckish? As I wasn't planning my trip in advance I didn't get a chance to read the logs here so I managed to make the same mistake that gerrym made. Despite feeling very nervous about halfway up the gully when I realised that I'd made a mistake, that the rocks I was depending on were pretty shaky and that I couldn't get back down safely and was better going on I did enjoy this section (once I reached the top!) and it all added to what I found to be a very interesting climb, much more interesting than I realised all those times I'd driven past. To me Muckish is a much more enjoyable climb than Errigal which I feel is a real slog in many ways and I hope to come back again and do it the proper way :) Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/comment/3329/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Muckish (<i>An Mhucais</i>) in area Derryveagh Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Cross on top of Muckish
 
marty1133 on Muckish, 2008
by marty1133  29 Dec 2008
Did this walk on a fine sunny Sunday morning, approached mounatin from the Miner path side and parked at the Mine itself (998292 A). When arrived at mountain a fierce gale was blowing down the cliff face, which made the accent up the steep Miner path pretty hairy (Almost dropped my GPS !). When arrived at top after about 50 mins of steep climbing it was pretty cloudy, but the cloudy did part for a fiew moments to allow me to take some great pics. Descended down the gentle West slope of Mountain down to (989291 B) and then followed the North face of the mountain back around to the car. 3.4 miles and 2hrs 45 mins. Not a bad way to spend a Sunday at all ! Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/comment/3489/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Muckish (<i>An Mhucais</i>) in area Derryveagh Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Looking down on the Miners' Track
Brilliant Experience
by Aidy  14 Sep 2014
A few weeks ago, coming down from Carrauntoohil and Cnoc na Toinne and making my way back to Cronin's Yard, I fell in to the company of a very knowledgable Corkman - obviously a very experienced hill walker. He had walked many of the mountains in my own northern end of the country, and was particularly effusive about Muckish. As he clearly knew his stuff, I resolved to tackle Muckish sooner rather than later, and now know that he was right - Muckish is a particularly brilliant mountain.

The routes have been well described here, so I can't add much. i took the southern route, parking at the shrine, the steep climb offering increasingly good views of the rest of the Derryveagh mountains. The plateau at the top is magnificent, with a covering of rock, and many cairns, some very impressive. In addition to visiting the large cairn in the middle of the plateau, the trig pillar, and the large cairn at the eastern edge with the cross, I would strongly advise leaving time to wander round the western and nothern sides too. There are fantastic views to be had over north and west Donegal, even if it was very hazy on my visit. One spot offered a great vantage point to look across and down at the Miners' Track. It looked so impressive that I descended part of the way down. The steep, winding path was a great experience, and the abandoned mining equipment was very interesting.

An absolutely brilliant mountain. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/comment/17678/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Muckish (<i>An Mhucais</i>) in area Derryveagh Mountains, Ireland
 
billycunns on Muckish, 2002
by billycunns  3 Nov 2002
Very enjoyable in winter. When looking from bottom at miners path take a route to your right and up the gap left of the cave to get a scenic ascent and a chance to get up on the rock stack. (see photo) Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/comment/191/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Muckish (<i>An Mhucais</i>) in area Derryveagh Mountains, Ireland
dmcdevitt on Muckish, 2005
by dmcdevitt  5 Jan 2005
Attempted to climb Muckish last week and had to abort the mission as the weather was awful. Take a look at the pictures. Attempting to climb Muckish from the track that is located from the North of the mountain and up the track to the quarry. This bit is fine despite the bad weather. It was the wet and slippery quarried rock up the quarry entrance that was very difficult. We continued up the steep incline to the wood stairs but then decided abandon due to fact that you need to actually need rope and a climbing helmet to continue the rest. It didn’t help when the rain was horizontal in your face. We came back down again and it was highly enjoyable. Headed to a local pub for some heat, dryness and warmth. It was then that the locals told us that if you attempted to climb the mountain from the north, you had a screw loose. Apparently, accessing this mountain from the south is much easier. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/163/comment/1405/
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