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Dublin Area   S: Dublin South East Subarea
Place count in area: 18, OSI/LPS Maps: 43, 50, 56, AWW 
Highest place:
Kippure, 757m
Maximum height for area: 757 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 262 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
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Mountpelier Hill Hill Hellfire Club A name in English Dublin County in Leinster Province, in Local/Historical/Cultural List

Height: 383m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 50 Grid Reference: O11495 23644
Place visited by 100 members. Recently by: sofearghail, adam.mann, jelena, Siddell1, abptraining, JoHeaney, Djouce, WozzaB, Prendo, Tomaquinas, brendanjrehill, dregish, oreills8, declantb, Fjon
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.330326, Latitude: 53.251706 , Easting: 311495, Northing: 223644 Prominence: 68m,  Isolation: 3.6km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 711419 723672,   GPS IDs, 6 char: MntpHl, 10 char: MntplrHil


Mountpelier Hill is the 990th highest place in Ireland.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1507/
COMMENTS for Mountpelier Hill (Hellfire Club) 1 of 1  
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Mountpelier Hill (Hellfire Club) in area Dublin, Ireland
Picture: Contemplating the Hellfire Club
 
The Hellfire Club
by wicklore  11 Aug 2017
The Military Road (R115) runs through the heart of the Dublin/Wicklow Mountains from Rathfarnham to Aughavannagh in deepest Wicklow. The road is 55kms long, and it was constructed between 1800 and 1809 in the wake of the 1798 Rebellion. It was designed to open up the wild Wicklow Mountains to the British army to assist them in reaching the insurgents who were hiding there. A number of military barracks were built along its length which were used to house the soldiers who could rapidly respond when rebels were afoot in the area.

Today the road offers excellent access to the mountains around Glenasmole, Glencree, Sally Gap, Glendasan, Glendalough, Glenmalure and Aughavannagh. It is a great route to see and admire some of the best scenery in Dublin & Wicklow. But besides the mountains and valleys there are many other things of interest along the road that are worth mentioning. From the supernatural to the mythical, the Military Road passes through areas rich in history.

One such curious piece of history is the Hell Fire Club. Shortly after the Military Road begins to rise above Dublin in Rathfarnham, it passes by the Hell Fire Woods car park on the slope of Montpelier Hill. In 1725 a hunting lodge, named Mount Pelier, was built at the summit, using stone from a nearby passage tomb. The destruction of the tomb gave rise to a sense that the building was cursed. Soon after this a storm blew the roof off the building. The roof was rebuilt with more stone and a series of paranormal events were subsequently reported. The central belief was that the Devil was active on the hill and in the lodge. This reputation was further enhanced when members of the Irish Hell Fire Club, which was active in the years 1735 to 1741, began using the lodge as a meeting place. There were many stories of wild behaviour and debauchery as well as occult practices and demonic appearances which added to the local folklore. A recent archaeological dig uncovered some of the original megalithic history of the site.

The Hell Fire Club is still standing, and appears as a hulking stone structure. It is in surprisingly good repair considering it has been abandoned for two centuries. Whatever your beliefs, there are few people who don’t get an eerie feeling in its dark interior. I have personally seen a Rottweiler dog escape from its owner and leap from a first floor window. (Unharmed but raising the hair on the backs of the necks of all who witnessed it). Countless folk will have stories of the eerie feeling encountered in the building. It can be a thrilling place for children to visit with adult supervision.

The views of Dublin and the coast are almost unsurpassed, and Lambay Island, Howth the Mountains of Mourne and Wales can easily be seen on a clear day. This place is visited by 100,000 people a year so go very early or very late if you seek seclusion. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1507/comment/19674/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
70 Miles as the crow flies .. by scannerman   (Show all for Mountpelier Hill (Hellfire Club))
 
(End of comment section for Mountpelier Hill (Hellfire Club).)

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