Cookies.
This website uses cookies, which are small text files that the website puts on your device to facilitate operation. Cookies help us provide a better service to you. They are used to track general user traffic information and to help the website function properly.
Features
Nearby features appear when you click the map.
Declutter tracks on map.
Place Search
Video
X
Pub: by
Donegal NW Area , N: Gweedore Subarea
Feature count in area: 8, all in Donegal, OSI/LPS Maps: 1, 10, 11
Highest Place: Tievealehid 429m

Starting Places (10) in area Donegal NW:
Altawinny Bay Road, An Chúirt Hotel, Cnoc Fola Carpark, Crockadillisk Bend, Crocknaneeve SouthWest, Cruit Golf Pier, Glasagh Road, Glassagh Beach, Procklis Lough, Teach Dixon

Summits & other features in area Donegal NW:
N: Gweedore: Moylemore (Owey Island) 102m, Carntreena 425m, Bloody Foreland 314m, Crocknaneeve 155.9m, Tievealehid 429m
S: Trawenagh: Croaghegly 245m, Trusklieve 175m
W: Arranmore: Cluidaniller West Top (Aranmore) 227m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Moylemore, 102m Hill An Mhaoil Mhór A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
Ir. An Mhaoil Mhór [logainm.ie], 'the big flat-topped hill', Donegal County in Ulster province, in Binnion, Irish Islands Lists, An Mhaoil Mhór is the 1506th highest place in Ireland. An Mhaoil Mhór is the second most westerly summit in the Donegal NW area.
Reachable "On Foot " Y
Grid Reference B71000 23200, OS 1:50k mapsheet 1
Place visited by: 14 members, recently by: Fergalh, Hyperstorm, jimjaninja, cduddy, osullivanm, simon3, magicstep, Garmin, Niamhq, bryanjbarry, wicklore, Harry Goodman, chalky, markmjcampion , Island visited by 17 members.
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
, I visited this island: NO
Longitude: -8.454561, Latitude: 55.055299, Easting: 171000, Northing: 423200, Prominence: 102m,  Isolation: 9.3km, Has trig pillar
ITM: 570956 923183
Bedrock type: Coarse grained monzogranite to tonalite, (Thorr Granite)

  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: Mylmr, 10 char: Moylemore

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/
Gallery for Moylemore (An Mhaoil Mhór) and surrounds
Summary for Moylemore (An Mhaoil Mhór): Go and enjoy this excellent Binnion.
Summary created by JohnA, simon3, Harry Goodman 2023-05-08 17:10:43
            MountainViews.ie picture about Moylemore (<em>An Mhaoil Mhór</em>)
Picture: Owey Island and Moylemore from Cruit Island.
Unless you have independent means you can arrange the short sea crossing to Owey Island with Dan Betty Gallagher who operates a summer sea taxi service Tel.086-A (B601 389)3. From the landing stage follow the clear track to the village and then go NNW to B (B71281 23353) before turning up left through a couple of small stone walled fields to gain the top marked by a trig pillar. While there, go some 100m further W to a large precariously perched boulder some 2 metres high C (B70882 23182) and which may lay claim to be the highest point on the Island. Extensive views can be enjoyed.
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/comment/15623/
Member Comments for Moylemore (An Mhaoil Mhór)
Comment create / edit display placeholder

            MountainViews.ie picture about Moylemore (<em>An Mhaoil Mhór</em>)
Picture: Tors and sea stacks off Owey island
Don't drink the water!
by wicklore 3 Sep 2015
I followed in the footsteps of Chalky and Harry Goodman with a trip to Owey Island two weeks ago. Cruit Island is connected to the mainland by a bridge. At the north end of Cruit there is a pier down a sandy/stone track just before the golf club house. Call Dan Betty in advance on 086A (B601 389)3 and arrange a lift to the island. He charges 10 euro return. He visits the island several times a day on errands, so can match up with your return time easily. As mentioned by Harry Goodman, there are various modern holiday homes and some farm buildings that are in various states of repair. One shed had the phrase ‘The Donkey Pelvis’ intriguingly painted above the barn door. The island has no permanent inhabitants.

There is a rough track from the pier that becomes a grass track. I passed a vegetable plot which was doing well, and a house that was being re-roofed. A little stream passes through the village, with front doors just a few feet away. It was all very quaint! I took a 2 hour ramble around the island, first visiting a small summit to the SE, then following the rugged coastline north admiring the cliffs, tors and sea stacks along the way. Iain Miller has written about these sea stacks, as has David Walsh in his book ‘Oilean’. I’m not a mountaineer and only those with technical climbing knowledge, experience and gear will venture out to these rocky outposts. As I rambled along, some herring gulls alerted me to their presence, and I prudently veered away to assure the birds I posed no threat to their nests. Previous experience on Inishark and Ireland’s Eye told me that these gulls mean business when protecting their nests!

Chalky and Harry Goodman have documented that the main summit of Owey actually has two high points about 100 metres apart. The eastern side has the trig pillar and the western side has a boulder about 6 feet high as pictured by Harry Goodman. Harry’s little cairn helped me climb up. It may only take a large storm to send it rolling down the hill, so get there quick to see this erratic erratic!

Below the summit to the NE is a small lake. It is just 30 feet or so from the edge of the cliffs. A huge area of cliff-fall is nearby, which has partially blocked/filled in a deep cleft in the cliffs. I pondered taking a refreshing drink of the lake water, but decided against it. Later Dan Betty, told me that he and others go up to the lake to put their feet in so that little fish can nibble away the dead skin cells and rejuvenate their feet! Don’t drink the water…!

Follow the old grass track from the lake back to the village and the pier. Two large telegraph poles are set into a small field with a hammock strung high up between them. This, and the Donkey Pelvis barn, remain unexplained! 2 hours was enough at a leisurely walk to see a good portion of the rugged west coast of the island. There is solitude, amazing views and nibbling lake fish! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/comment/18283/
Read Less
Read More

            MountainViews.ie picture about Moylemore (<em>An Mhaoil Mhór</em>)
Picture: Houses and fancy narrow roads for a donkey or quad.
Lots of renovated houses.
by magicstep 26 Jun 2017
Owey is busy during summer weekends. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/comment/19549/
Read Less
Read More

Not so easy to summit.
by chalky 26 Jul 2015
Betty Dan ( 086 A (B601 389)3 €10 ) operates a ferry service in the summer months to this lovely island from the jetty by the Cruit Island golf club . The summit seems to be not the trig but a very large precarious looking boulder requiring an equally large stretch to gain a foot hold thereafter easy. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/comment/18209/
Read Less
Read More

            MountainViews.ie picture about Moylemore (<em>An Mhaoil Mhór</em>)
Possibly the highest point on the hill !.
by Harry Goodman 4 Aug 2015
This photograph shows the large erratic on the summit area of Moylemore and which visually, at least, appears to mark the highest point on the hill. The small pile of stones on the right was needed to help me climb up onto the boulder some 2 metres high. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/comment/18226/
Read Less
Read More

            MountainViews.ie picture about Moylemore (<em>An Mhaoil Mhór</em>)
Picture: The approach to Moylemore from Owey Is. village.
Well worth visting.
by Harry Goodman 4 Aug 2015
Moylemore is a very worthy Binnion. After a short crossing by boat from Cruit Island (1 August 2015) I followed a well made track up from the landing stage to the village, a small group of new and restored houses all of which are only occupied in summer. Once clear of them I continued along a now grassy track NNW for about 500 metres before leaving it and turning up left B (B71281 23353) to pass through a couple of small stonewalled fields to gain the rocky summit area. The recognised high point of the hill is marked by a trig pillar at F (B70978 23194) but some 100 metres further west is the large precariously perched erratic some 2 metres high at C (B70882 23182) and mentioned in chalky's comment as a contender to be the highest point on the Island, a view that I would share. However given the close proximity of both points it is very easy to visit them. Rather than go back down by my way of ascent I continued down the undulating rocky ridge to the N end of the island past a small lough and up onto a fine rocky ledge with sheer drops down to the sea. I then walked back along the central grassy track to my start point. Views from this modest hill are extensive. The fine cone of Errigal is prominent to the E with the Bluestacks to the S and Arranmore to the SW. For anyone wishing to visit Owey Island Dan Betty Gallagher operates a summer sea taxi service from the Pier at the N end of Cruit Island. He can be contacted at 086A (B601 389)3. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1379/comment/18225/
Read Less
Read More
EDIT Point of Interest
text
Videos
Recent Contributions
x
Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions and a privacy policy.
Read general information about the site.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks, shared GPS tracks or about starting places may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk.
See the credits and list definitions.

OSi logo
OSNI/LPS logo
Open Street Map
(Various variations used.)
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills