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Donegal NW Area , S: Trawenagh Subarea
Feature count in area: 8, all in Donegal, OSI/LPS Maps: 1, 10, 11
Highest Place: Tievealehid 429m

Starting Places (10) in area Donegal NW:
Altawinny Bay Road, An Chúirt Hotel, Cnoc Fola Carpark, Crockadillisk Bend, Crocknaneeve SouthWest, Cruit Golf Pier, Glasagh Road, Glassagh Beach, Procklis Lough, Teach Dixon

Summits & other features in area Donegal NW:
N: Gweedore: Moylemore (Owey Island) 102m, Carntreena 425m, Bloody Foreland 314m, Crocknaneeve 155.9m, Tievealehid 429m
S: Trawenagh: Croaghegly 245m, Trusklieve 175m
W: Arranmore: Cluidaniller West Top (Aranmore) 227m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Trusklieve, 175m Hill Troscshliabh A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
Ir. Troiscshliabh [logainm.ie], poss. 'barren/rocky mountain’ [PDT], Donegal County in Ulster province, in Binnion Lists, Troscshliabh is the 1437th highest place in Ireland. Troscshliabh is the most southerly summit in the Donegal NW area.
Grid Reference B78900 01800, OS 1:50k mapsheet 10
Place visited by: 9 members, recently by: eamonoc, dregish, markmjcampion, Fergalh, hgboyle, Harry Goodman, Aidy, chalky, Garmin
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -8.329374, Latitude: 54.863476, Easting: 178900, Northing: 401800, Prominence: 138m,  Isolation: 5km
ITM: 578854 901788
Bedrock type: Biotite granite, medium-coarse, (Trawenagh Bay Biotite Granite)
Notes on name: There is a small but widespread group of place-names containing the element trosc in the counties along the western and northern coasts of Ireland. Truskmore in Co. Sligo is probably the best-known example. P.W. Joyce explained these with the word trosc meaning ‘cod’ (fish), either from a fancied resemblance of the hill’s profile to the shape of a cod, or from the prevalence of cod in the nearby seas. However, neither of these explanations stand up to scrutiny. The fifteen different hills and townlands involved present a variety of quite different shapes, such as cones or flattened piles, which seems to rule out a resemblance to a fish. Some examples are 15km or more inland, making an illusion to rich fishing grounds unlikely. It seems more likely that trosc is simply an ancient Irish word for a hill which is steep and/or rocky, a word which now only survives in this group of place-names. It is also possible that the word denotes unproductive land which is poor, even for sheep grazing. It may well consist of tor, ‘rock’, metathesised to tro- and combined with the suffix -sc.Troiscshliabh / Trusklieve is quite rocky in parts and the land is rough pasture. This specific name is also unusual for its structure. It is a compound of noun + noun, a structure which is rare and ancient. Dónall Mac Giolla Easpaig has argued that it fell out of use by 400 AD (Études Celtiques 18, 1981). If so, this name is over 1,500 years old. It can be compared with another Trusklieve / Troiscshliabh in par. Kilballyowen, Co. Clare.
  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: Trsklv, 10 char: Trusklieve

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1322/
Gallery for Trusklieve (Troscshliabh) and surrounds
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Member Comments for Trusklieve (Troscshliabh)

            MountainViews.ie picture about Trusklieve (<em>Troscshliabh</em>)
Picture: From the summit
Hill With Character
by Aidy 17 Mar 2015
Climbed after turning off the N56, shortly after crossing the Gweebarra River bridge, heading north. Parked on a minor road, which doesn't seem to be named, on the east side of the hill between Toome Lough and the smaller Lough Achush. From there, it was a short walk up the gentle slope to the summit, marked by a trig pillar. Great views on the way up over the two loughs, and at the top, more views opened up to the west and the north. The hill itself, though small, has a rocky character, and I found it a pleasure to walk. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1322/comment/17885/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Trusklieve (<em>Troscshliabh</em>)
Picture: Gweebarra Bay from Croaghleconnell
Thanks for the trig pillar
by cnocadoir 3 Apr 2015
Thanks for posting that walk. Been back that network of boreens, found a court tomb and early inscribed cross, but didn't know about that trig pillar. Sounds like a much better walk than the one to Croaghleconnell trig piller (next one NE in Derryleconnell Near). For that one you need wellies the whole way to near the summit. Had hard showers the whole way. Nice view also, but looking forward to Toome! Go raibh matih agat. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1322/comment/17904/
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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills