Croaghaun 688m mountain, Achill/Corraun Achill Ireland at MountainViews.ie
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Achill/Corraun Area   Achill Subarea
Rating graphic.
Croaghaun Mountain Achill Island Island Cruachán A name in Irish
(Ir. Cruachán [logainm.ie], 'little stack') Mayo County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Best Hundred, Irish Highest Hundred, Irish Islands Lists, X-bedded psammites and schists Bedrock

Reachable "On Foot " Y
Height: 688m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 22/30 Grid Reference: F55961 06091
Place visited by 253 members. Recently by: tsheehy, hak493r, chrismcc, CaptainVertigo, Ulsterpooka, mountainmike, thomas_g, murphysw, ckilm, FrankMc1964, pearnett, simon3, PaulaMc, Wildcat, rogers
Island visited by 394 members.
I have visited this place: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)   I have visited Achill Island: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -10.196559, Latitude: 53.984075 , Easting: 55961, Northing: 306091 Prominence: 688m,  Isolation: 0.7km
ITM: 455940 806102,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Crghn, 10 char: Croaghaun
Bedrock type: X-bedded psammites and schists, (Croaghaun Formation)

It was the tradition for local children to pick berries on the mountain on the last Sunday of July, known locally as Garlic Sunday (apparently a corruption of 'garland') (MacNeill, 191). Walks: for a cliff-top walk near Achill Head, see Siúlóidí Acla, walk A. Previously Tonacroaghaun in MV.   Croaghaun is the highest mountain in the Achill/Corraun area and the 131st highest in Ireland.

Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/?PHPSESSID=cqece55rr2et1jnl2smedjkeo3
COMMENTS for Croaghaun << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Croaghaun
 
david bourke on Croaghaun, 2006
by david bourke  16 Oct 2006
Croaghaun as seen from the sea cliffs Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/2525/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: From Croaghaun to SW top
jlk on Croaghaun, 2008
by jlk  4 Apr 2008
A gap in the mist, April 2008 Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/3026/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: view of saddle head from just below the summit
 
extreme achill
by scannerman  21 Sep 2010
parked the car at lough acorrymore and headed up croaghaun last wednesday with the intention of finding bunnafreva west. The first time i climbed croughaun was back in 97 and i did'nt know then of the loughs existence.

we climbed around the lower north east shoulder of the mountain with the intention of walking up the ridgeline to the summit and having a look at bunnafreva on route but just when we reached the loughs location thick cloud came in and we could'nt see anything. It was a strange feeling standing at the edge of the ridge, all i could see was several rocks for a few feet down and then thick fog, you might never have realised it was over a thousand feet to the atlantic ocean directly below.

i was pretty sure the cloud would lift and after an hour of waiting around, getting soaked in two showers, nearly getting blown back down the hill and half frozen into the bargin, the cloud lifted and we got a fine view of the incredible lough.It seems to hang precariously, being so close to the cliff edge.

we then followed the ridge to the summit in about 45mins, the views down to saddle head are breathtaking and the line from the summit to the ocean half a mile below are something else......its not a mountain for the faint hearted though and extreme care needs to be taken, many parts of the cliff edge are broken and ready to plunge into the abyss!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRpJq9LDg5A Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/6100/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Cloudy... but don't let that put you off!
by Derry_Danderer  1 Oct 2013
3 of us took on this hill on a very overcast day August 2013. Because of the journey to get there we decided to go ahead despite the low cloud level and some warnings from other members- I'm glad to say we were not disappointed!
Starting at Lough Acorrymore we headed South West, up along the shoulder and direct for the summit of Croaghaun. This was a fairly tough hike to begin with, it evens out to a more gradual slope at ~400 to 475m and then gets steeper once more just prior to the summit. The thick low cloud kept visibility down to ~60ft for the duration however at the summit the cloud broke and offered us views down the enormous cliffs and out to some of the smaller islands offshore. The view is easily a match for that from Slieve League for those of you who have been

We followed the ridge North East to directly above lake Bunnafreva where descended from the East side down steep grass slope onto boulders to the lake level. At this point our own directions (not the weather conditions) took us slightly awry. We stayed at lake Bunnafreva height and moved NE then East to the slope south of numerous other lakes (approx F58190 07780 A). We realised we couldnt continue on this course so headed back up the very steep slope to the top then followed the obvious stream downhill, turning off South West at lake Acorrymore altitude to return to start point.
I wouldn't recommend following this final part of our route, however, if you do want to get down to lake Bunnafreva for a closer look you can safely get there by walking past it to the East and descending down and returning back past the more gradual slope at F575 076 B.

A very worthwhile day out, taking our time and with the unplanned off-piste exploration, taking roughly 5 hours at a very moderate pace for 11km total trip. We used the GPS to get back on track so the conditions were never much cause for concern. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/15208/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Earlier in the day from Slievemore in passing rain
 
Breathtaking Views
by Aidy  3 Aug 2015
Approached from Croaghaun SW Top having come up from Keem Beach. Despite good views on the way up, thick cloud had rolled in from the north and the short walk over from the SW Top was done in almost zero visibility and high winds. I was still well aware of the steep drops into grey nothingness below on the northern side so stayed back from the edge. As I got to the top I tried, only half successfully, to console myself that it isn't all about views, and its great just to be out on the mountains anyway. At that point, incredibly and almost instantaneously, the sea to the north snapped into view and the clouds passed. For the first time I got the full impact of amazing views over Saddle Head to the North East, and to Croaghaun SW Top's pointed summit and Achill Head to the West. Astonishing views. The cloud closed in again only 15 or 20 minutes later, and I contentedly made may way down again. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/18222/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Lough Bunafreva West
Awe inspiring
by Damian120  1 Jul 2018
We are currently in the throes of a heatwave and Keem Beach itself was simply glorious at 8 am that morning. I was seriously tempted to stay at the beach for a little while longer. However, I followed the route up from Keem Beach that is well documented here on the website.

The temperature remained constant and even at the summit it still felt very warm. The views from the summit are nothing short of stupendous. I think I had the finest view in Ireland that day and sat down and enjoyed the lunch I had brought. I could see Jed Geraghty's charter boat under the cliffs as he was doing the sea cliffs tour. But being so high up it was all but a little speck in the sea. From the summit all the deserted islands appear in one sweeping vista, the Inishkeas to Inishglora. Slievemore Mountain to the right appeared in all its majestic glory. Returning I followed the route along the small stream heading back to Keem Beach and noticed the air temperature was getting hotter and hotter. It hit thirty degrees Celsius, my feet were literally on fire so I sat down beside the steam and took off the boots to let my feet soak in the clear and wonderfully cool spring water. It was the pure perfection. Trackback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/19955/
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