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Derrynasaggart Area   W: The Paps Subarea
Place count in area: 24, OSI/LPS Maps: 79 
Highest place:
The Paps East, 694m
Maximum height for area: 694 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 623 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
The Paps East Mountain An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir A name in Irish (Ir. An Dá Chích [OSI], 'the two breasts') Kerry County in Munster Province, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Green sandstone & purple siltstone Bedrock

Height: 694m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 79 Grid Reference: W13323 85542
Place visited by 330 members. Recently by: Denis-Barry, Pepe, nupat, JohnFinn, SeanPurcell, tryfan, childminder05, mlmoroneybb, Musheraman, marymac, Hillwalker65, a3642278, Carolyn105, Kirsty, PrzemekPanczyk
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.263178, Latitude: 52.015624 , Easting: 113323, Northing: 85542 Prominence: 623m,  Isolation: 0.8km
ITM: 513294 585599,   GPS IDs, 6 char: ThPpsE, 10 char: ThPpsEst
Bedrock type: Green sandstone & purple siltstone, (Glenflesk Chloritic Sandstone Formation)

The Dictionary of Celtic Mythology gives the full name as Dá Chích Anann, 'the two breasts of Anu'. This goddess was reputedly responsible for the fertility of the whole province of Munster. A line of stones, known as na Fiacla, connects the two tops and is believed to have formed a processional route.   The Paps East is the highest mountain in the Derrynasaggart area and the 121st highest in Ireland.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/116/
COMMENTS for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir) << Prev page 1 2 3 4 Next page >>  
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain The Paps East (<i>An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir</i>) in area Derrynasaggart, Ireland
 
Ya Gotta Visit Both
by JohnFinn  7 Jul 2022
I'm posting this under The Paps East but I can't imagine anyone doing just one Pap; if you go there you really have to do both - it's a short and easy trek from one to the other. We did a loop walk of 9.3 kms taking in the East Pap first and then going on to the West Pap. (I've posted the gpx of the route - it's number 4689.)

There is ample parking by the sign for Shrone Lake. After 1.06 kms on the track we took a fairly obvious left turn and it was then an easy ascent - mainly through heather but with some sheep paths as well - to the East summit cairn. The weather had deteriorated during the ascent and we had to don our wet gear but conditions improved by the time we got to the top which we reached in 1.5 hours.

It was then down into the col between the two Paps and up on to the West one where the clouds had lifted and we were able to exult in the wonderful views in all directions.

From there we made our way back to the road and a 1.5 km walk to the cars. Total time was 4.5 hours. An easy and rewarding hike and highly recommended.

Note: if you are coming from the Cork direction your SatNav may tell you to take the first right turn after the county bounds - the L11182. Do not take that road as it is very narrow. Take the next one instead - the L7058 and signposted for Clonkeen and the Clydagh Valley. Drive to the end of the road where you will see the sign for Shrone Lake. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/116/comment/23577/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
It's a good straghtforward climb and a great plac .. by mart   (Show all for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir))
 
Magical spot....truly awe inspiring and the place .. by bucksull   (Show all for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir))
 
The City of Shrone .. by patd   (Show all for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir))
 
The Paps, Mullaghanish and Mushermore .. by peter1   (Show all for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir))
 
East and West Paps .. by oldboots   (Show all for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir))
 
COMMENTS for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir) << Prev page 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
(End of comment section for The Paps East (An Dá Chích Anann - An Chíoch Thoir).)

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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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