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Cooley Mountains Area , S: Cooley South Subarea
Feature count in area: 12, all in Louth, OSI/LPS Maps: 29, 36, EW-CLY
Highest Place: Slieve Foye 587m

Starting Places (24) in area Cooley Mountains:
Annaloughan Loop Walk CP, Beck's Lane, Cadger's Bridge, Carlingford Car Park, Carlingford Greenway, Clermont Junction, Clermont Pass Bridge, Corna Mucklagh House, Deserted Village, Feede South, Flagstaff Viewing Point, Foxes Rock SW, Glenmore Tain Way, Grange Cross, Long Woman's Grave, Lower Faughil Road, Slieve Foye Viewing Point, Slievefoy Forest CP, Slievenagloch N, Spellickanee Mid, St Oliver's Park, The Ben Rock, The Lumpers, Two Mile River CP

Summits & other features in area Cooley Mountains:
N: Cooley North: Anglesey Mountain 421m, Carnavaddy 475m, Clermont 444m, Clermont Carn 510m, Clermont Carn NE Top 448m
S: Cooley South: Barnavave 350m, Slieve Foye 587m, Slieve Foye North-West Top 548.1m, Slievenaglogh 310m, The Eagles Rock 530m, The Foxes Rock 404m, The Ravens Rock 457m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Slievenaglogh, 310m Hill
Place Rating ..
, Louth County in Leinster province, in Binnion Lists, Slievenaglogh is the 1142th highest place in Ireland. Slievenaglogh is the most southerly summit in the Cooley Mountains area.
Grid Reference J13679 08759, OS 1:50k mapsheet 36
Place visited by: 59 members, recently by: Carolineswalsh, Oscar-mckinney, Jai-mckinney, Dee68, archmeister, Carolyn105, Geo, AntrimRambler, trostanite, Bernieor, madfrankie, abcd, dregishjake, dregish, LorraineG60
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -6.266561, Latitude: 54.015613, Easting: 313679, Northing: 308759, Prominence: 153m,  Isolation: 4.2km, Has trig pillar
ITM: 713603 808768
Bedrock type: Microgranite with granophyric texture, (Granophyre)

  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: Slv310, 10 char: Slvnglg310

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/
Gallery for Slievenaglogh and surrounds
Summary for Slievenaglogh : A very worthy addition to the MV lists.
Summary created by JohnA, Harry Goodman 2022-03-30 20:02:52
            MountainViews.ie picture about Slievenaglogh
Picture: Looking W over Dundalk Bay from the summit.
Park at AnLoughn (J13005 10104) and 150 metres further SW along the road cross a stile on the right. Follow the track due S up along the forest edge to its crest before bearing off SE to pass a memorial plaque to an aircraft crash, A (J13113 08998). Continue up ESE over grass and heather and around several rocky outcrops to gain the top marked by a trig pillar. Alternatively from the parking place walk SE along the road for 1km to SlGloch (J13601 09659). Cross a gate on the right and go up a couple of fields keeping the fence on the right. Further up to avoid some scrambling cross the fence on to thick clumpy grass and follow the fence line up to a sharp turn left and a narrow gap between two rocky out crops B (J13574 09019). From here go SSE to a noticeable grassy ramp some 200 metres along and use it to gain the top some 50 metres further. The walk to the top of this hill presents splendid views NE and N to Slieve Foye and the Cooley Mts while to the S, over Dundalk Bay, is the long flat coastline of Louth and Meath and the more distant outline of the Dublin hills. A very worthy addition to the MV lists.
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/comment/15363/
Member Comments for Slievenaglogh

            MountainViews.ie picture about Slievenaglogh
Picture: Bulk of the mountain standing over St Patricks GFC Grounds
The Trig is the Top!
by Trailtrekker 30 Aug 2015
Of the January 2014 Binnion additions this has to be one of the best and well done to those who added it. Of those who have been out there early doors I hope that you visited the trig point, as this is the true summit and not the one initially marked down as such!

I accessed the summit using the way marked Annalough Loop starting at the car park of Fitzpatricks restaurant and bar. If using this way marked trail to access the summit you can start here, or there is an easier access point from the stile at AnLoughn (J13084 10063), which is higher above sea level and a shorter trip to the top, it has ample car parking and will make your walk a bit shorter. By using the Annaloughan Loop, whether walking all or part of it, just off it is the site of a 1942 Plane Crash which claimed 15 victims. It was the most tragic crash in Ireland in the entire WWII/Emergency period, of which there were many, although despite this it is one of the lesser known crashes to have happened in our hills! The memorial to the crash is beside a rocky outcrop at A (J13113 08998). The best account that I have found of it online is on the link below and I would suggest that you have a read of same before setting out for the hill.
http://www.skynet.ie/~dan/temp/al577/AL577_MOReilly.pdf
The legs of the plane can still be seen in the nearby bog, but I will leave it to those who read the article to ascertain where! The area around here is wet under foot and from here you can take a bearing towards the summit.

There is another point of interest on the way marked loop! Although not as aesthetically outstanding as the many neolithic tombs in this area, the Rockmarshall court tomb is probably the oldest of them all! It is marked on the OSi map and the remnants of it can be found at C (J12500 08000). While I'm mentioning neolithic tombs in the area, you really should check out Proleek Dolmen and it's impressive 40 tonne capstone which is a gentle stroll out the back of the grounds of the nearby Ballymascanlon hotel.

This is an area that has produced some of Louth and Ireland's greatest sport stars in recent years, the nearby Gaelic Football Club has been the most successful in Louth for the past decade. Their finest product being Paddy Keenan, Louth's first All Star and International player. While the brothers Kearney, both recent winners of the rugby six nation championship, are from just a few miles further out the road! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/comment/15934/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Slievenaglogh
Picture: View west from Slievenagloch.
Interesting views from a minor summit.
by simon3 1 Feb 2017
While it's never going to be hard to climb a 310m hill, this one does put up something of a fight when approaching it from the North, with defenses of mush rush, barbed gorse and little tracks.
The view from the top is interesting. The summit sits like the focus of the gigantic mirror of the Carnavaddy to Slieve Foye Cooley Ridge and thus affords a great overview of this ridge.
The attached photo however shows about 100 degrees of the land to the west of the summit. To the right of this is the little appreciated ridge to the south west of Clermont Carn which ends in the grandly named "The Castle", 384m.
To the left of the picture is Dundalk with coastal features such as Soldier's Point.
Right of centre is Slieve Gullion with some of the remains of the volcanic ring dyke such as Croslieve and Feede Mountain visible. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/comment/18837/
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            MountainViews.ie picture about Slievenaglogh
Picture: AL577 Liberator remains.
History on the hills.
by paddyhillsbagger 20 Jan 2015
15 airmen lost their lives on this hill in 1942. There is a memorial mentioned in Harry Goodman's comment and an excellent website for further info on dp_burke's comment. What I wasn't expecting and stumbled upon was the landing gear of that fateful plane still sitting on the hillside. A little time to reflect on those that have gone before does not go amiss. It's also worth noting the permanence of the mountains compared to our short time on them. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/comment/17810/
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Pleasant 90 Minute Stroll
by Pepe 15 Jan 2019
A blanket of cloud covered the higher Cooleys from Foxe's Rock to Foye but Slievenagloch was in the clear - happy days! Lots of logging activity at 9.30 of a Monday morning, so no space to park at A as it was full of lorries. Room for one car at the roadside directly opposite the stile mentioned in Harry Goodman's post, so parked there and set off as per Harry's instructions. Went to the trig but also visited the cairn (just in case!). Making your way down from the trig and up to the cairn glance to the south: a beautiful little triangular lough lies hidden between two shoulders of the mountain.
From the cairn you can make a beeline down to the road to emerge roughly at Point G. Slievenagloch is a bit wet in places but lots of sheep trails and other little paths take the strain out of what is a pleasant mountain diversion. Back at the car in under an hour and a half. However I'll have to go to Specsavers now as I failed to spot either a plaque or a plane wreck. Maybe next time ... Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/comment/20336/
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Liberator AL577 on 16 March 1942
by dp_burke 4 Apr 2014
I am trying to complete a page on the Crash of Liberator AL577 on 16 March 1942.
the link is at: http://skynet.ie/~dan/war/al577.htm Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/1119/comment/15963/
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British summit data courtesy:
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