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West Cork Mountains Area , NW: Knockboy Subarea
Feature count in area: 62, by county: Cork: 45, Kerry: 24, of which 7 are in both Cork and Kerry, OSI/LPS Maps: 78, 79, 85, 86, 88, 89
Highest Place: Knockboy 704.8m

Starting Places (47) in area West Cork Mountains:
Barley Lake North, Barrboy, Caha Pass, Carranmore, Carrigacappeen, Carriganass Castle, Castle Donovan Car Park, Clearagh House, Coolkellure House, Coomhola Bridge, Corrigatirra, Cousane Gap, Cummer Lough East Road, Derreencollig Wood, Esk Boreen, Fuhiry Wood, Garinish Island Pier, Glasagarav River Bridge, Glasnacummeen Stream, Glengarriff, Glengarriff Nature Reserve CP, Gorteeniher Drimoleague Heritage Walk CP, Gortloughra River Road, Gougane Barra Oratory, Gougane Barra Park CP, Grousemount Wind Farm, Kealkill Village, Knockanuha, Knockbrack South, Lough Atooreen N, Lough Nambrackderg North, Lough Nambrackderg Wood, Lough Nambreacdearg, Mealagh Bridge, Molly Gallivan's Visitor Centre, Nowen Hill West Road, Owvane River Bridge, Pookeen North Top Road, Pooleen Wood Car Park, Priests Leap, Reenroe Bridge, River Roughty, Shandrum Concrete Silo, Sillahertane Stream, Slaheny River Horseshoe, Top of Coom, Turner's Rock Tunnel

Summits & other features in area West Cork Mountains:
Cen: Maughanaclea: Maughanaclea Hills East Top 470m, Maughanaclea Hills West Top 452m
Cen: Shehy More: Shehy More 545.6m, Shehy More SW Top 446m
E: Clearagh: Clearagh Hill 287m
E: Currane: Currane Hill 228m
N Cen: Douce: Douce Mountain 476m, Doughill Mountain 471m
N: Carran: Barnastooka 497m, Bealick 537m, Carran 604m, Carran Far NE Top 561m, Carran Far North Top 506m, Carran NE Top 555m, Carran South Top 567m, Knockantooreen 450m
N: Conigar: Conigar 566m, Conigar SW Top 566m, Foilastookeen 540m
N: Coomataggart: Carrigalougha 423m, Coomataggart 530m, Coomataggart SW Top 509m, Derrineanig 304m, Lackabaun 472m, Mweelin 487m
NE Cen: Carrigarierk: Carrigarierk 343m
NW: Barraboy: Barraboy Mountain 460m, Barraboy Mountain Far East Top 456m, Barraboy Mountain SE Top 409m, Derroograne 468m, Turners Rock 420m
NW: Knockboy: Caoinkeen 692.8m, Caoinkeen South-East Top 553.5m, Coomhola Mountain 472m, Knockboy 704.8m, Knockboy North Top 651.2m, Knockboy South Top 533.3m, The Priest's Leap 519m
NW: Knocknamanagh: Bird Hill 412m, Coomclogherane Top 449m, Gullaba Hill 603m, Knockbrack 440m, Knockbrack South Top 458m, Knocknamanagh 637m, Knocknamanagh NE Top 625m
S Cen: Dunmanway Hills: Cashloura 296.8m, Coolsnaghtig 295.8m, Inchanadreen 310m
S Cen: Nowen: Milane Hill 354.4m, Mullaghmesha 494.3m, Nowen Hill 535.2m, Nowen Hill Far West Top 405.2m, Nowen Hill SW Top 509m, Pookeen North Top 319m
S: Leap Hills: Carrigfadda 311.7m, Killeigh Hill 229m, Knockarudane Hill 169m, Knockscagh 195m
S: Skibbereen: Barryroe Hill 156m, Lick Hill 158m
W Cen: Knockbreteen: Knockbreteen 239m
W: Bantry: Knocknaveagh 282m

Note: this list of places may include island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Knockboy, 704.8m Mountain An Cnoc Buí A name in Irish,
Place Rating ..
(Ir. An Cnoc Buí [OSI], 'yellow/golden hill') County Highpoint of Cork and in Cork/ Kerry counties in Munster province, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Knockboy is the highest mountain in the West Cork Mountains area and the 107th highest in Ireland. Knockboy is the highest point in county Cork.
Grid Reference W00482 62058, OS 1:50k mapsheet 85
Place visited by: 413 members, recently by: maoris, Carolineswalsh, knightsonhikes, CianDavis, JordanF1, MarionP, Hikerjjl, edowling, Tuigamala, ToughSoles, cactustravelfan, Moirabourke, Padraigin, Nailer1967, wallr
I visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member for this.)
Longitude: -9.443415, Latitude: 51.80251, Easting: 100482, Northing: 62059, Prominence: 685m,  Isolation: 0.6km, Has trig pillar
ITM: 500453 562123
Bedrock type: Purple & green sandstone & siltstone, (Caha Mountain Formation)
Notes on name: Knockboy is the highest point in Co. Cork, although its summit is shared with Co. Kerry. It is less spectacular than some of the hills further west, such as Hungry Hill. It is perhaps a surprise that Cork's highest point is lower than Mount Leinster on the boundary between Carlow and Wexford, two counties which are hardly known for their mountains. All of this goes to show that ruggedness and height do not always go hand in hand. This peak, or at least one in this vicinity, was marked as Seebwee on the Grand Jury Map of Co. Cork in 1811. Since an adjective such as buí, ‘yellow, golden’, is rarely combined with suí, ‘seat’, one must consider other possibilities. Suí is most usually followed by a personal name in the genitive, often of a mythical character, e.g. Suí Finn, ‘Fionn’s seat’, a recurring mountain name. It is, therefore, likely that the original name was Suí Baoi, ‘seat of Baoi’, referring to a pagan goddess, who is also remembered in Oileán Baoi, the Irish name of Dursey Island (which see), and Dún Baoi / Dunboy, the ancestral seat of the O’Sullivan Beare clan near Castletown Berehaven. and strongly connected with the Beara Peninsula. Baoi may be another name for the mythical Cailleach Bhéirre (Hag of Beara). In medieval texts Baoi seems to denote the SW part of the Beara Peninsula (but perhaps more than just Dursey Island alone). The modern form of the hill-name An Cnoc Buí is probably a rather banal re-interpretation of an ancient name with divine resonance. If so, there is no need to search for shades of yellow in the landscape to account for the name.
  Short or GPS IDs, 6 char: Knckby, 10 char: Knockboy

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/
Gallery for Knockboy (An Cnoc Buí) and surrounds
Summary for Knockboy (An Cnoc Buí): Great views abound from the remote, boggy highpoint of Cork.
Summary created by markmjcampion, Colin Murphy, jackill 2023-09-11 13:13:03
            MountainViews.ie picture about Knockboy (<em>An Cnoc Buí</em>)
Picture: Knockboy from Lough Boy
Situated close to Bantry Bay on the Kerry/Cork border, Knockboy is Cork's highpoint. It's a nondescript, boggy and usually wet summit with more interesting terrain amidst some of its outlying peaks. But what it lacks in character is easily compensated by the far reaching views of Bantry Bay, Mangerton, the Reeks, Dunkerron and Caha mountains.

W. Park at Priests Leap (V98530 61072) on the the Priest's Leap road - room for 2 cars. This is a v narrow, steep road with few passing places. Cross the first of many fences and make your way to the shores of Lough Boy; here pick up another fence to the N of the lake and follow it to the trig point.[2hrs 5k return] Alternatively, follow the fence along the county boundary to the tiny lake north of Lough Boy, swinging roughly E here to follow a fence to near the summit. [2hrs+ 6k return]

NE. Park near L N'breacdrg (W03922 64895) and follow a spur W to the summit of Caoinkeen enjoying two corrie lakes en route. From Caoinkeen head S by the county fence reaching Knockboy N Top after 2.5k. Now, it's a short down and up to Knockboy. Allow 2h to top.

S. Longer route - park easily off the road near Car'Mor (V99585 57581), walk up the grassy, well-drained slopes of Coomhola Mt. Continue N from here either via Lough Boy or swing E to include the S Top in your itinerary. Allow at least 2hrs to summit. Return via Priests Leap (V98530 61072) and enjoy the return road walk.

Track/4355 is short up and down, track/3207 gives a long day out and track/1798 is a fitting track no. for the rebel county!
Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/4864/
Member Comments for Knockboy (An Cnoc Buí)

            MountainViews.ie picture about Knockboy (<em>An Cnoc Buí</em>)
Picture: Gully above Lough Akinkeen
One of Munster's Monsters
by kernowclimber 11 Mar 2021
After our sortie on Hungry Hill using Lynch’s ‘Munster’s Mountains’ back in May we might have expected another challenge in the wilds of West Cork! We resolved to tackle Cork’s highest mountain via a gully from Lough Akinkeen described in Lynch’s book. There is room for only one car at CarigCapen (W02229 65760) by a gateway onto a forestry track where I was bitten alive by clouds of horseflies and midges before I’d even had time to don the DEET! The recently surfaced track leads steeply upwards to the pine fringed lough situated at 300 metres. Close to the tree line it splits; one branch leads straight through the trees toward the shore, the other trends right running around the SW shore to bring the climber close to the steep cliffs of Lough Akinkeen. There are several near vertical gullies etched deeply into the cliff face. The one we chose is above a fence, contains a small stream and is to the right of a long unclimbable gully that shoots leftwards toward the highest point of the cliffs. Leave the path and cross the fence below the gully. Climb about 100 metres up through long grass and heather to reach the bottom of the gully.

The 200m gully, described separately, was wet, much vegetated and the rock was green with slime and greasy to climb. Near the top, the views of Lough Akinkeen, Knockantooreen and Carran were inspiring until cloud suddenly descended. An eerie silence ensued as wafts of mist enveloped us in a ghostly embrace. As we trudged uphill through the heather towards the cairn on Caoinkeen the wind picked up and visibility was poor. The ground is very boggy hereabouts and I had my first experience of planting my feet on what I thought to be terra firma only to find myself sinking rapidly into shin deep bog and unable to extricate myself. Fortunately mcrtchly was on hand to haul me out of the mire that very reluctantly released me with a disgusting sucking sound. Suitably soiled we continued S-SW past the trig point towards Knockboy some 2.5km distant. The wind was now driving droplets of rain that landed on our Gore-Tex jackets and hats with a constant strident hiss. Passing Lough Nambrackdarig over hummocky terrain interspersed with rock, heather and thick carpets of bog, the rectangular silhouette of the trig point at Knockboy finally appeared through the gloom.

We did not tarry long at Cork’s highest point returning towards Caoinkeen but turning NNW to contour round and gain the W ridge of Akinkeen on steep ground near a fence. At about A (W00596 64944) (the 550m contour line) another fence branched off to the right and we followed this NE down the ridge until the 430 contour line at B (W01027 65440), then battled our way through slippery long wet grass to gain the track by the lake. Six hours and 12km later we arrived at our car, leaking wet and absolutely filthy, having completed another of Lynch’s ‘Munster’s Mountains’ which we have now renamed ‘Munster’s Monsters’!! Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/5985/
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Ogres About!
by MountainBoy 9 Jul 2017
As part of our quest to stand at the top of every county in Ireland, me and my Dad found an opening in our calendars to attempt Knockboy on 9.7.17. Our fears of bad weather as we were crossing over the Youghal bridge were allayed as we moved further west and into blazing sunlight. After a little bit of asking around we found the entrance to the much-dreaded Priest's Leap. We soon found that Google Street View is not the best indicator of the quality of a road as Dad was forced to use the handbrake to get us over some of the most perilous dips (fortunately a brand new clutch had been installed the day before). Thankfully we did not meet anybody coming back down the road, which would have been quite inconvenient. As Dad was struggling to keep the car moving forward, I looked out onto the beautiful valley to our left (Dad remarked that it must have been formed by one hell of a glacier). Eventually, after one final dip, we came out onto the parking area (due to its size it took us a few minutes to find a suitable space). We met a man who was planning to run up the mountain. Fair play to him! We spent some time admiring the wonderful views (including my first ever view of the Reeks!). We followed the fence across the road as far as the first intersection, where we crossed over (no stiles). As we were following the fence, I fell into the deepest mud I've ever seen (sorry Arderin). Dad tastefully described what ended up on my shoe as "ogre s**t". After that unfortunate incident, we decided to avoid the rest of the Bog of Doom and cut across towards the lake. After crossing over a fence (this time with a stile) at one end of the lake, we began the final stage of the ascent. I have little to say on this, except that there are a few steep bits and a couple of annoying false summits. When we got to the top we admired the 360 degree views and had a few custard creams (I also presented Dad with my birthday card). The way down was basically the same, except for the fact that we saw a few people going up (one man even had a baby on his shoulders, much to Dad's astonishment. As we were heading down, we made plans to visit Moylussa at some point in August. 1 hr 20 mins up, 1 hr 15 mins down. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/19589/
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Cork County Top
by mazamegaza 18 Aug 2015
We decided to approach the priests leap from the north as advised by roscorocket who we had met on another county top. We had no OS map so make sure you take the turn for the priests leap rather than follow signs for the priests leap circuit which takes you away from Knockboy! Its a straight forward walk from the small car park by the cross (2 cars) to the trig at the top. There are signs warning you not to startle any grouse as they are trying to improve the population.
We had beautiful sunny weather and our reward at the top was a panoramic treat looking over to the Macgillycuddys on one side and Bantry Bay on the other. 2 hours up and down as you start the walk so high up. Lovely. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/18258/
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aidand on Knockboy
by aidand 15 Apr 2008
There are ongoing access problems on Knockboy. Please talk to the locals before attempting to climb Knockboy, or contact the Kenmare Walking Club. I understand that some of the members of this club are trying to resolve the problem. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/3043/
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sparow on Knockboy
by sparow 23 Feb 2005
You can drive up to the top of priests leap in a car - not a bus (simplifies the traverse to Ahinkeen). It makes for a short walk to the summit, ideal for winter or if you start out late. But, do not drive up if you like your car or don't like reversing. It's unprotected and passing spots are few - I had to reverse up the hill 300M to let a car through. Linkback: mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/1492/
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