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West Cork Mountains Area   NW: Knockboy Subarea
Place count in area: 62, OSI/LPS Maps: 78, 79, 85, 86, 88, 89 
Highest place:
Knockboy, 706m
Maximum height for area: 706 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 685 metres,

Places in area West Cork Mountains:
Cen: Maughanaclea:   Maughanaclea Hills East Top 470mMaughanaclea Hills West Top 452m
Cen: Shehy More:   Shehy More 545.6mShehy More SW Top 446m
E: Clearagh:   Clearagh Hill 287m
E: Currane:   Currane Hill 228m
N Cen: Douce:   Douce Mountain 476mDoughill Mountain 471m
N: Carran:   Barnastooka 497mBealick 537mCarran 604mCarran Far NE Top 561mCarran Far North Top 506mCarran NE Top 555mCarran South Top 567mKnockantooreen 450m
N: Conigar:   Conigar 566mConigar SW Top 566mFoilastookeen 540m
N: Coomataggart:   Carrigalougha 423mCoomataggart 530mCoomataggart SW Top 509mDerrineanig 304mLackabaun 472mMweelin 487m
NE Cen: Carrigarierk:   Carrigarierk 343m
NW: Barraboy:   Barraboy Mountain 460mBarraboy Mountain Far East Top 456mBarraboy Mountain SE Top 409mDerroograne 468mTurners Rock 420m
NW: Knockboy:   Caoinkeen 692mCaoinkeen South-East Top 555mCoomhola Mountain 472mKnockboy 706mKnockboy North Top 649mKnockboy South Top 532mThe Priest's Leap 519m
NW: Knocknamanagh:   Bird Hill 412mCoomclogherane Top 449mGullaba Hill 603mKnockbrack 440mKnockbrack South Top 458mKnocknamanagh 637mKnocknamanagh NE Top 625m
S Cen: Dunmanway Hills:   Cashloura 296.8mCoolsnaghtig 295.8mInchanadreen 310m
S Cen: Nowen:   Milane Hill 354.4mMullaghmesha 494.3mNowen Hill 535.2mNowen Hill Far West Top 405.2mNowen Hill SW Top 509mPookeen North Top 319m
S: Leap Hills:   Carrigfadda 311.7mKilleigh Hill 229mKnockarudane Hill 169mKnockscagh 195m
S: Skibbereen:   Barryroe Hill 156mLick Hill 158m
W Cen: Knockbreteen:   Knockbreteen 239m
W: Bantry:   Knocknaveagh 282m

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Knockboy Mountain An Cnoc Buí A name in Irish (Ir. An Cnoc Buí [OSI], 'yellow/golden hill') County Highpoint of Cork and in Cork/ Kerry Counties in Munster Province, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Purple & green sandstone & siltstone Bedrock

Height: 706m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 85 Grid Reference: W00480 62060
Place visited by 343 members. Recently by: abcd, annem, grzywaczmarcin, BelfastMo, Oisin_Egan, SeanPurcell, glencree, Oscar-mckinney, Jai-mckinney, Carolyn105, frostie89, Chance, garybuz, karoloconnor, Paddym99
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.443414, Latitude: 51.802466 , Easting: 100480, Northing: 62060 Prominence: 685m,  Isolation: 0.6km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 500453 562118,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Knckby, 10 char: Knockboy
Bedrock type: Purple & green sandstone & siltstone, (Caha Mountain Formation)

Knockboy is the highest point in Co. Cork, although its summit is shared with Co. Kerry. It is less spectacular than some of the hills further west, such as Hungry Hill. It is perhaps a surprise that Cork's highest point is lower than Mount Leinster on the boundary between Carlow and Wexford, two counties which are hardly known for their mountains. All of this goes to show that ruggedness and height do not always go hand in hand. This peak, or at least one in this vicinity, was marked as Seebwee on the Grand Jury Map of Co. Cork in 1811. Since an adjective such as buí, ‘yellow, golden’, is rarely combined with suí, ‘seat’, one must consider other possibilities. Suí is most usually followed by a personal name in the genitive, often of a mythical character, e.g. Suí Finn, ‘Fionn’s seat’, a recurring mountain name. It is, therefore, likely that the original name was Suí Baoi, ‘seat of Baoi’, referring to a pagan goddess, who is also remembered in Oileán Baoi, the Irish name of Dursey Island (which see), and Dún Baoi / Dunboy, the ancestral seat of the O’Sullivan Beare clan near Castletown Berehaven. and strongly connected with the Beara Peninsula. Baoi may be another name for the mythical Cailleach Bhéirre (Hag of Beara). In medieval texts Baoi seems to denote the SW part of the Beara Peninsula (but perhaps more than just Dursey Island alone). The modern form of the hill-name An Cnoc Buí is probably a rather banal re-interpretation of an ancient name with divine resonance. If so, there is no need to search for shades of yellow in the landscape to account for the name.   Knockboy is the highest mountain in the West Cork Mountains area and the 106th highest in Ireland. Knockboy is the highest point in county Cork.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/
COMMENTS for Knockboy (An Cnoc Buí) << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 Next page >>  
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sparow on Knockboy, 2005
by sparow  23 Feb 2005
You can drive up to the top of priests leap in a car - not a bus (simplifies the traverse to Ahinkeen). It makes for a short walk to the summit, ideal for winter or if you start out late. But, do not drive up if you like your car or don't like reversing. It's unprotected and passing spots are few - I had to reverse up the hill 300M to let a car through. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/1492/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
SDillmore on Knockboy, 2005
by SDillmore  17 Mar 2005
Not much to add. Took a St. Patrick's day trip up Priest's Leap. The warm weather didn't follow me up the mountain. If you look at the OSI map, you will see where the Priest's Leap road goes from yellow to black. I didn't notice much of a change, but sparow was right, oncoming traffic would be a pain. Visibility was about 20 meters, and it had been raining, so very boggy walk to the summit. Easy to get lost, so make sure you have a map and compass. Basically, I just followed the road north from the priests leap for about 600m, followed the stream up to Lough Reagh, then made a beeline for Knockboy summit. Quite the stiff wind up there, and it was much colder than I expected.
I imagine the walk would be pretty in nice weather. The drive up Priest's Leap maybe not so much if you are vertiginous.
Be prepared to climb a few fences, especially if visibility is bad and you have to follow a bearing. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/1538/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockboy (<i>An Cnoc Buí</i>) in area West Cork Mountains, Ireland
Picture: View towards Bantry Bay from summit
 
Great Views from the Top of Cork
by SpiritOf84  6 Aug 2015
The biggest challenge of this outing was getting the car up to Priest's Leap! Took the well documented route via Lough Boy to the summit. Amazing 360 degree views from the top, which was a pleasant surprise as the forecast had been for cloud. Descended around to the northern side and then headed in a westerly direction back down to the road. That provided a beautiful vista on our right down to Kenmare and beyond to the Reeks. Be careful along here in fog though - there are a few dangerous sudden vertical drops. Walked the last 300m up the road to the car.

I would advise against this climb if there is no chance of experiencing the view - wait for a clear day to appreciate it. It's not a huge challenge and would be a bit of a slog without the rewarding views. Also, there are about two places to pull in on the narrow road up to Priest's Leap (Cork side). Well worth stopping at one of these to experience the view across the valley towards Bantry Bay. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/18233/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockboy (<i>An Cnoc Buí</i>) in area West Cork Mountains, Ireland
simon3 on Knockboy, 2003
by simon3  4 Sep 2003
Knockboy is the highest point in Co Cork. Seán Higgisson [Hillwalker’s Guide to County Cork, 2001] wrote of it that “On a clear day it is said you can see Cork City to the east and the Coastline of Cork including the Old Head of Kinsale.”

When this panorama was taken looking north and north east, there was so much heat haze that we could scarcely see beyond the summit of Ahinkeen, to the left of the picture on the skyline. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/631/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knockboy (<i>An Cnoc Buí</i>) in area West Cork Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Lough Boy - disappearing into the clouds
 
A wet and windy end to the year
by murraynolan  31 Dec 2010
I walked Knockboy with a friend on the 30th of December 2010. Weather was miserable with minimal visibility as clouds scudded by at around 30 knots.

We parked at Priest's Leap and followed the fence until it ended before heading over point 561 to the bottom edge of Lough Boy, which we skirted before reaching another fence that leads almost all the way to the summit.

This was the final peak of my bid to reach all of the county tops in 2010, so we dropped down a little from the summit to enjoy some port with hot blackcurrent.

We had planned to push on towards Caoinkeen but given the conditions there was little point and less will.

Naturally, the weather began to clear behind us as we rollercoasted down towards Bunane and on to Kenmare :)

Walk time: 1 hr to summit, 45 to return. Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/6184/
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Don't be put off by the drive!
by paulocon  27 Sep 2011
For the second time in two days, my visit to a summit had been accompanied by thick cloud cover. Starting from Priest's Leap and after very heavy rain the previous night and during the morning, the going up Knockboy was a very heavy slog. What I guess are normally gentle trickles down the mountain had turned into raging, roaring torrents. By the time I was half-way to Lough Boy, all visibility was gone, the rain was coming down heavy and the mountain sheep seemed to be discussing why yet another idiot was trying to make his way to the top of Cork in such conditions.


I struggled on (cheating with my GPS) and was very glad to see the trig pillar and the sorry-looking cairn that marks the top of the largest county in Ireland. The lack of views was somewhat made up for by the fact that I now had reached 21 county-tops. Typically, the cloud decided to move off as I made my way back to my starting point giving a hint of the views available from higher up the mountain.


For the record, the drive up Priest's Leap isn't at all bad when you approach from the Kenmare side. The biggest challenge were the torrents of water coming down the road in a couple of places after the early deluge. While only wide enough to take 1 car in most places and with grass growing in the middle of parts of it, the road has plenty of places to pull in/reverse to should you meet another car. I take it the Cork side offers a more severe driving challenge.

I have put some more info including a GPS trace at http://climbingirelandsmountains.blogspot.com/2011/09/taking-leap-to-top-of-cork.html Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/104/comment/6472/
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(End of comment section for Knockboy (An Cnoc Buí).)

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