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Foel Grafiau West Top: Short trek to summit from track

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Iveragh NW Area   SW: Skelligs Subarea
Place count in area: 18, OSI/LPS Maps: 83, 84 
Highest place:
Knocknadobar, 690m
Maximum height for area: 690 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 565 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Skellig Michael Hill Sceilg Mhichíl A name in Irish
also Great Skellig an extra name in English
(Ir. Sceilg Mhichíl [logainm.ie], 'rock of St. Michael') Kerry County in Munster Province, in Binnion, Irish Islands Lists, Red conglomerate, sandstone & mudstone Bedrock

Reachable "On Foot " Y
Height: 217m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 83X Grid Reference: V24600 60600
Place visited by 47 members. Recently by: jimmytherabbit, jgfitz, finkey86, Aglaisio, rollingwave, DenisMc, gallybander, Cobhclimber, DavidWalsh, IainT, chalky, mirnamirna, Dbosonnet, jcofarrell, gmpr40
Island visited by 61 members.
I have visited this place: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)   I have visited this island: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -10.541804, Latitude: 51.770775 , Easting: 24600, Northing: 60600 Prominence: 217m,  Isolation: 2.5km
ITM: 424588 560664,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SklgMc, 10 char: SklgMchl
Bedrock type: Red conglomerate, sandstone & mudstone, (Old Red Sandstone (undifferentiated))

The highest point on the island is known as Cró na Snáthaide, 'eye of the needle', and was visited by pilgrims who kissed a cross-inscribed slab overhanging the abyss. This fell into the sea at some time during the 19th century. As access to the summit is now forbidden to protect the site, a visit to the monastery will count as an ascent of this peak. The word sceilg is probably an early alternative form of speilic, both derived from Latin spelunca, ‘cave, den’, a word sometimes applied to hermit’s dwellings. The change sp- > sc- probably occurred in the early Christian period when Irish had no native words with p, cf. Ir. Cáisc, ‘Easter’, < Latin Pascha. It is no coincidence that two of the best known and earliest recorded instances of sceilg are at 6th century monastic sites with hermitages, namely Skellig Michael and Templenaskellig near St. Kevin’s Bed at Glendalough.   Sceilg Mhichíl is the 1367th highest place in Ireland. Sceilg Mhichíl is the most southerly summit and also the most westerly in the Iveragh NW area.

Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1031/
COMMENTS for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl) << Prev page 1 2 3 Next page >>  
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Monks are not stupid - great piece of nature in t .. by yambox   (Show all for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl))
 
Reaching the highest point of Sceilg Mhicíl could .. by dbloke   (Show all for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl))
 
Summit pinnacle and hermit's dwelling. .. by fingalscave   (Show all for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl))
 
Whether you get beyond the monastery or not, a vi .. by brucekenendy   (Show all for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl))
 
The summit experience...
by Peter Walker  20 Dec 2013
In the absence of anyone able to provide us with anecdotal remeniscence of an ascent of Skellig Michael, I thought a post I happened upon on the UK Climbing forums might be of interest...

"Years ago (1990ish) I snuck off from a boatload of visitors to the 'monastery' and soon found my way to the high point of the island.
It was an easy enough scramble but once at the summit rock, the sense of exposure was terrifying. The land was all beneath and the atlantic stretched away on the horizon for 360 degrees.

With a stiff breeze blowing, it was a challenge to detach myself from the rock and begin the downclimb - not so much a crux move as sheer elemental terror and a feeling of my own personal insignificance, the sense of being connected to the earth had evaporated in that moment.
What I found remarkable about the summit is that it was once one of the most important sites for pilgrimage in western Europe.

I believe there are similar beehive structures in the Outer Hebrides."

Suitably intrigued, I contacted the author (Mike Foyle) for permission to post it up here. He has agreed, and also very generously elaborated a bit upon his original post.

"If I remember ( it was about 1990) , it was a relatively easy scramble, I needed to use my hands. I think at the time I was more fearful of missing the return boat, or of someone stopping me, so I just headed up quickly. I guess that's why I ended up feeeling as I did, because in rushing up, there was no gradual acclimatisation to the increasing exposure. The terror came within the last few feet when there was nothing but air and sea and wind. I remember seeing the rusted stump, which I took to be the remnant of a cross, and marvelled at the people who had toiled to fix it there, and the pilgrims who had made the same journey.

I feel privileged to have been there. I'd hate it to become part of a list to tick though. I guess that sounds elitist but it was a humbling experience which, to me is at odds with the modern mentality of conquering summits ( I've done my share of that also)."

I suggest that anyone planning a 'sneaking away from the guardians' ascent to the highest point should bear in mind that this post came from a CLIMBING forum, and Mike's idea of an 'easy scramble' might be slightly more technically difficult than yours... Linkback: https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1031/comment/15285/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
The Decline and Fall-Gibbons .. by CaptainVertigo   (Show all for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl))
 
COMMENTS for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl) << Prev page 1 2 3 Next page >>
(End of comment section for Skellig Michael (Sceilg Mhichíl).)

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Some mapping:
Open Street Map
(Various variations used.)
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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