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"Ireland map" for .. by pazapas   (Show all posts)
I am leading a wal.. by patrickelvin   (Show all posts)
Simon’s observatio.. by padodes   (Show all posts)
I used WGS 84 in A.. by Moac   (Show all posts)
Hi all - i have a .. by darrenf   (Show all posts)
Padodes comments o.. by simon3   (Show all posts)
While walking on t.. by simon3   (Show all posts)
padodes
2008-08-09 15:54:22
The process of photography
With holidays a fading memory and thoughts turning to Irish hills again, I found it pleasant to read last month’s MV Newsletter. Under the heading ‘Mountain Photography’, it directed me to the Walkers Association website and there a very fine photo of Mullaghanattin by Eric O’Gorman (winner of MV’s competition in 2006) caught my attention. Perhaps as added commendation, the photo was described as being ‘unmanipulated’, which I take to mean not post-processed. The impression, however, that an image that has not been post-processed using computer software is therefore completely ‘unprocessed’ - and hence, implicitly, more genuinely true-to-nature and objective - is hardly an accurate one. It doesn’t take into account what has already taken place in the camera itself. Even in the simplest cameras, pre-programmed algorithms get to work straight away on the raw data registered by the sensor when the button is pressed. This usually entails the compression of the data into a Jpeg file, discarding in the process what the camera ‘interprets’ as non-essential, even though that may include detail we would ourselves prefer to preserve. It also means that the colours are rendered according to algorithms that likewise interpret the colour data received. If you can arrange to have several differently branded cameras to photograph the same landscape simultaneously, using the equivalent photo setting of ‘normal’ or ‘natural’ on each one, you will find that the colours will still vary, and sometimes considerably, from camera to camera. Whether any one of them reproduces closely what the eye has seen is very much open to question. On the other hand, if your camera allows you to shoot ‘raw’, without in-camera processing, you can later use a computer programme to do what the camera has done, although this time with a far greater degree of personal control and perhaps fidelity to your original vision. Similarly, you can re-process a Jpeg file to get the picture to look as vibrantly close to what you saw as you can get it. It is true that this also opens up, not only the possibility of some degree of artistic interpretation, but also that of ‘creation’ and downright ‘manipulation’. Given the documentary nature of MountainViews, my own opinion would be that post-processing should not be of the creative kind. I recently saw the web page of an Irish photographer, offering his heavily ‘Photoshopped’ images of Wicklow. They were aesthetically pleasing, but had little to do with the 'real' Wicklow I walk in.
While always havin.. by barryredmond   (Show all posts)
Moac, thanks for l.. by wicklore   (Show all posts)


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 17 Next page >>
Summit Comment
Curra Hill: Cloudy Climb
andreos97 14 hours ago.
Fantastic walk, personally feel it's best starting your approach from Glenbeigh village and heading up through the forest (663 908) as it's quite well signposted. Once leaving the cover of the tre...

  
Track
Barnavave and Slieve Foye from Carlingford
simon3 a day ago.
This route mostly takes low gradient tracks to ascend to first Barnavave and then Slieve Foye.Ascending Barnavave from... walk, Len: 9.8km, Climb: 684m, Area: Barnavave, Cooley/Gullion (Ireland) Barn

  
Summit Summary
Barnavave: Double humped, easy to visit, good views.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 a day ago.
One way to go up is from Carlingford. Start at around J1839 1095 up a path (not the adjacent track). Following the track makes for an easy ascent. It is also possible to start on the SW side for e...

Forum: General
Carol Morgan wins the women's Spine Race agai
IainT 2 days ago.
Carol Morgan from Dublin has come in as first woman in the Spine Race for the 2nd time after crossing the Cheviots in some of the toughest conditions in the race for years. She is over a day ahead...

  
Track
Nire Valley 22km loop walk through the Gap and to Crotty's and up to Fauscoum
Ulsterpooka a week ago.
walk, Len: 20.4km, Climb: 1140m, Area: Fauscoum, Comeragh Mountains (Ireland) F...

  
Summit Comment
Knockastia: Hunting and shooting forbidden
ceadeile 4 days ago.
The path described by FergalH is now, January 2018, very overgrown. There are many thorn bushes in particular which make it a somewhat dangerous for your eyes. A simpler approach is to park at the...

Forum: General
When hill-walking meets (pre)history
David-Guenot 3 days ago.
Amazing discovery by a hill-walker. It seems the Irish hills still have many a secret to hide... http://www.thejournal.ie/ancient-human-remains-mayo-3805783-Jan2018/?utm_source=shortlinkAnd an art...

  
Summit Comment
Banagher Hill: Better road surface - easier access now
Pepe 4 days ago.
Followed the Bluestack Way sign mentioned by Aidy. The road is well surfaced now, though narrow. Drove a couple of kilometres NW (ignoring lower-down parking areas) to a small plantation on the le...

  
Track
Drumnalifferney North East Top
Aidy a week ago.
I did this route in winter conditions, and the views to be had around the Derryveagh Mountains, over Dunlewey, and ac... walk, Len: 8.7km, Climb: 577m, Area: Drumnalifferny North-East Top, Donegal NW

Summit Comment
The Ravens Rock: Crispy Morning Rock Hopping
Pepe 4 days ago.
Climbed this via the ascent up the Fox's Rock from the Long Woman's Grave. Took the direct route up (steep and slippy!) on a crunchy January morning. The light and the views were magnificent. If y...

  
Bibliography
Exploring Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way by David Flanagan & Richard Creagh
aidand 4 days ago.
This book is definitely a keeper, a book I’ll hang on to knowing I’ll return to it again and again.I don’t know who the genius is who came up with the concept of the Wild Atlantic Way (WAW) but th...

  
Track
January Club Walk - Na Sleibhte Hillwalking Club - Route 1 (of 5 options)
GSheehy a week ago.
" 'Twas like doing the Turks challenge after the Christmas dinner." walk, Len: 31.0km, Climb: 1800m, Area: Fauscoum, Comeragh Mountains (Ireland) F...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 17 Next page >>