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pdtempan
2017-04-02 23:59:12
Light and Shade
I've just spent a week on the slopes of Teide, the mountain which casts the largest shadow on earth, according to various sources for Tenerife tourist info. True or not, it was certainly true that we were not in direct sunlight until about 9.30 in the morning, about 3 hours after sunrise. Which has me thinking: the amount of sunlight an area gets is of great importance to farming communities. In French-speaking parts of the Alps and Pyrennes they use the terms adret and ubac to denote the sunny and shady slopes of the mountain. Adret seems to be from Latin ad dextrum, "to the south, south-facing", while ubac, or bac, is from opacus, "opaque, dark". In the Vosges the term envers is used for shady slopes. These differences determine where the snow lingers longest, where different crops can be grown, where herds of livestock are best kept, etc. I'm sure they must have been equally important to our ancestors and must have played a major role in coining place-names in Ireland. The various hills called Greenane or Greenoge denoting sunny spots (from Ir. grian, "sun") immediately spring to mind. But I wonder if some names on the MV lists are not more 'opaque' examples of this phenomenon. Buckoogh in Co. Mayo was interpreted as Ir. Boc Umhach 'eminence rich in copper' by John O'Donovan in the Ordnance Survey Name Book, but is there any evidence for copper there? It would be good to hear from anyone with local knowledge. The south-facing slope of Buckoogh gives the gentlest approach, while both the north-east and north-west slopes are significantly steeper. Could it really be Bac Ubhach, meaning something like "shadowy slope", where ubhach is an Irish form equivalent to French ubac? Looking on the brighter side (!), I think that some of our names with odhar or odhartha, usually understood as "dun-coloured, yellowish-brown" might well be yellowed precisely because they are weathered by the sun. Odhartha looks distinctly like an Irish form of French adret. Cashloura, a townland in the Shehy Mountains, is situated on the southern brink of a hill, so *caiseal odhartha, "sun-beaten fort" or "fort facing the sun" seems an apt description. Any thoughts and other examples?
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RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 18 Next page >>
Summit Comment
Knockbwee: Summit Revealed
CaminoPat 17 hours ago.
From the south, parking available for only one car at W124 775. Proceed uphill from junction with local road in a NNW direction along a rough stone covered road until you come to a six bar field g...

  
Track
Slieveboy Loop
jgfitz 23 hours ago.
We followed the official National Loop Walk, Loop 106C, which is the purple trail. We took one small shortcut, but add... walk, Len: 14.1km, Climb: 424m, Area: Slieveboy, North Wexford (Ireland) Slie

  
Summit Summary
Crocknafarragh SE Top: Climb it, but include one or more "cousins"
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 a day ago.
The way to Crocknafarragh SE Top can follow the full route up to Crocknafarragh with an additional 700m walk out to the lesser top or, part of the way up, by contouring up and around the S flanks ...

Track
Croughan ridge by going around Lough Acorrymore
simon3 a day ago.
This is a relatively easy way to reach the Croughan ridgeline and get a taste for the magnificent all-round views. Ir... walk, Len: 7.8km, Climb: 595m, Area: Croaghaun SW Top, Achill/Corraun (Ireland

  
Summit Comment
Baurtregaum Far NE Top: Great views from a so-so mountain
Colin Murphy 2 days ago.
The view over Tralee Bay at low tide from Baurtregaum Far NE Top had the appearance of the Amazon River delta!

  
User profile
eamonoc
eamonoc 2 days ago.
A lot of walking done and so much more to do, thank you Mountainviews for the inspiration

Track
Scouting the start of the Galty Challenge.
jackill 2 days ago.
walk, Len: 17.5km, Climb: 623m, Area: Slieveanard NE Top, Galty Mountains (Irel...

  
Summit Comment
Bunnacunneen South Top: Simple bag from nearby tops
Colin Murphy 2 days ago.
For approach see entry for Bunnacunneen SE Top. From that grassy summit it is just over 1km across a gently rising slope to the NW and the South Top's equally grassy summit, which has marvellous p...

  
Track
molls gap loop walk
strangeweaver 5 days ago.
From the car park at molls gap follow the narrow country lane down to the pass between to stumpa duloigh and Knocklome... walk, Len: 17.6km, Climb: 985m, Area: Dunkerron Mountains (Ireland) Knocklome

Summit Summary
Bunnacunneen SE Top: Handy track
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy 2 days ago.
Although there was a sign on the track at L973 570 forbidding trespassers, the farmer in the nearby farmhouse had no problem with us using the track, which curved up the hillside almost to the sum...

  
Track
Simple ascent of Minaun.
simon3 5 days ago.
An easy way up starting from the carpark. walk, Len: 3.6km, Climb: 121m, Area: Minaun, Achill/Corraun (Ireland) Minaun

  
Summit Summary
Caherbarnagh East Top: A Hidden Gem Discovered
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 3 days ago.
Park off road next to gate at the saddle between Claragh Mountain and Curracahill W23626 87990. There's room for 3-4 cars to park safely. Climb gate and follow rough stone track keeping forest to ...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 18 Next page >>