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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
Scavenger Walk 7 “.. by Bleck Cra   (Show all posts)
The Military Road .. by wicklore   (Show all posts)
On the red poppy, .. by Bleck Cra   (Show all posts)
The Galtys are red.. by kernowclimber   (Show all posts)
Making the most of.. by kernowclimber   (Show all posts)
This shelter, or b.. by kernowclimber   (Show all posts)
Bleck Cra
2011-06-20 23:53:35
"" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

THE WILD FRONTIER
I have a customer in the North. She would be described by enlightened Northern Catholics as a “Protestant Lady”, by others as one of “them’uns” and by Protestants of a different hue as a “Wee P”. A Presbyterian. Her views on Ireland are educated, erudite, informed and outrageous. One getting a blustery airing at the moment comes from the wardrobe of widows’ weeds she wears in mourning for the death of Protestant Ireland in the eyes of the media, the movies, history and America. This view unfolds as follows: on his lunchbreak stop in Moneygall, American President Barack Obama chose to visit neither the local church of his ancestor nor the graveyard. How so - and she answers. “Because Obama’s Irish heritage is of course Protestant.” Is she right then – when we remember Davy Crocket, Kit Carson, Mark Twain, James Stewart, Stonewall Jackson, Arnold Palmer and umpteen American Presidents that we forget they all come from the Irish Protestant tradition?
At the foot of imposing Meall Garbh on the Ben Lawers Group ridge, above a heavenly Loch Tay in the Southern Scottish Highland, he came over the rise. His eyes were bright as diamonds; they sparkled like the dew. “That is a fine afternoon” he proposed and we talked; I in my Galloway-come-Belfast bastard brogue and he in his immaculate Tennessee. “Your ancestors and mine were probably related,” I eventually suggested "– and Protestants?” “Indeed Sir they probably were. Why, my mother was a Sullivan.” And he said this like a Protestant Sullivan was the most natural thing in the world.
Meall Garbh rises like its mad sister, An Stuc and their big brother, Ben Lawers, directly from Lochan nan Cat, all of whom hover haughtily over limitless Loch Tay. Today Birnam Wood came to Dunsinane and other interesting revelations.
Scavenger Walk 7, .. by Bleck Cra   (Show all posts)
...finally got rou.. by Conor74   (Show all posts)
The Northern Irela.. by simon3   (Show all posts)


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Summit Comment
Camaderry South East Top: Glenealo Valley and Miners Village
sev 20 hours ago.
Glenealo Valley and Miners Village - view from south slope of Camaderry South East Top (Aug. 2010)

  
Summit Comment
Camaderry South East Top: Glendalough Upper Lake
sev 20 hours ago.
Glendalough Upper Lake and the valley - view from south slope of Camaderry South East Top (Aug. 2010)

  
Summit Comment
Seefin: "Megalithic Fallout Shelter"
sev a day ago.
Wicklow Mountains - Megalithic tomb on Seefin Mt.http://youtu.be/u--BKEqB-JM

Summit Summary
Skregmore: Incidental summit in the Reeks
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker a day ago.
Much climbed but little remembered, Skregmore is a victim of its location. One of the highest summits in Ireland but adjacent to still higher tops, impressively rocky but still far less dramatic t...

  
Track
Near Slieve Foye North-West Top, Cooley/Gullion (Ireland)
Gus 3 days ago.
Tough ascent from the carpark, but once on the ridge is reasonably easy with an identifiable track. On the return kee... walk, Len: 8.7km, Climb: 413m, Area: Slieve Foye North-West Top, Cooley/Gullio

  
Summit Summary
Cnoc an Bhráca: The last hurrah of the high Reeks
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker 2 days ago.
Cnoc an Bhráca, together with its near neighbour Cnoc na DTarbh, are the last (relatively) high summits along the great ridge of the Eastern Reeks; beyond here the ground gradually declines to the...

Track
Wicklow: Cullentragh Mountain
Onzy a week ago.
Easiest route to an hill that is really just a point on the way to Mullacor and beyond ... run, Len: 5.0km, Climb: 185m, Area: Cullentragh Mountain, Dublin/Wicklow (Irela...

  
Summit Summary
Tievnabinnia: Bulky Sheeffrys summit
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker 3 days ago.
Tievnabinnia is the easternmost of the higher Sheeffry Hills, a distinctly bulky eminence where gently grassy upper slopes contrast with a series of steep corries to both north and south of its ge...

  
User profile
WalkinIreland
WalkinIreland 2 days ago.
Walking Holiday Ireland provide self-guided hiking & guided walking tours in Ireland’s Ancient East and along the Wild Atlantic Way since 2012 for hiking & trekking enthusiasts from around t...

Summit Summary
Maumtrasna: A steep-sided fortress in the West
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker 4 days ago.
Maumtrasna is one of the most singular mountains in Ireland, a monumental sprawl of plateau plunging away in viciously steep slopes around almost all of its perimeter; these slopes are themselves ...

  
Track
A Postcard from the Edge
mcrtchly a week ago.
This summer we spent 2 weeks in the Faroe Islands, a remote arrowhead-shaped archipelago of 18 basalt islands rising up walk, Len: 4.3km, Climb: 216m, Area: Faroe Islands, Nor?oyar ()

  
Summit Comment
Corn Hill: New Pathway around the Summit
TommyMc 6 days ago.
A new pathway around the summit has been installed over the summer. Walkers are now met with a locked gate within circa 50 yards of the masts and trig point, but a new and quite attractive pathway...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 27 Next page >>