MountainViews
Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.

General Whatever you want to say that doesn't fit under the comments about places or another forum.
Sort by >

More controls

<< Prev page 1 .. 295 296 297 298 299 300 .. 391 Next page >>
Post details Post   (Contract pics)
Yes, dhmiriam, the.. by padodes   (Show all posts)
Ok dbloke, Croagh .. by wicklore   (Show all posts)
dhmiriam
2009-06-11 22:43:25
Perspective
Yes, padodes, there is always more to a mountain than meets the eye, ergo this passionate debate on the iconic Irish mountain. That one has appeared indifferent, poetically or otherwise, toward mountains, hills and bumps or created the notion that a mountain is capable or incapable of being indifferent, surprises. Not the mountain though, it continues to not give two hoots consideration. I’ve confused, obviously. What Irish mountain could be considered the best embodiment of that Idea or Ideal of ‘mountain-ness’, you ask?
The one that has all the millions of little bits of 'mountainess' whirling around and doing intricate mountainy convolutions best, inside the mountain, I guess. It is defining it that causes the problem. ‘A quintessential expression (a ‘paradigm’ or ‘icon’) of what makes a perfect mountain and of which all our visible mountains are but partial and imperfect embodiments’ to quote yourself. So lets sheathe our dagger definitions for a minute, and allow me re-iterate that recommendation to immerse oneself in the range on offer as given by the likes of those mountainy men, Kirk, Beighton, and of course our own simon, pdtempan, wicklore, ahendroff, C.Murphy, dbloke, to name just a few, to get an inkling of how difficult a task it may be, to select the Iconic Mountain of Ireland.

In all likelihood, there may be countless opinions, including Patrick Kavanagh’s, and no definitive one isolated, because we cannot rule out the eye of the beholder, or his head and heart in relation to ‘iconic mountain’, but that is only my opinion. The fun lies in the consideration. In answer to the question, which one would I chose for the flag? Personally I would run with one of those interesting Platonic invisible ones mentioned, or the beautifully mathematical precision of the Tetractys, so that one includes the range as well as the singular, and the poetic, but I jest. Quote ‘In the end, no artistic magnification of a pebble can give you the same vertigo as an encounter with the symmetry of a soaring, sky-scraping, scintillating colossus of rock.’ Un-quote. Well….maybe…. unless it’s the magnitude of that specific little round pebble, dancing its intricate mountainy convolutions, down the side of scintillation, alongside its brother pebbles, under a sheet of sliding shale, under both ones feet while making one’s way down a- Devils- Coach- Road- like of descent. To whom then does one's heart cry out to, the colossus to stop soaring or the little pebble to stop sliding in its blessed indifference? In the end? Yes, very possibly.
Guys, does it take.. by dbloke   (Show all posts)
Being from the are.. by slemish   (Show all posts)
Having walked/scra.. by Colin Murphy   (Show all posts)
Has no one suggest.. by ahendroff   (Show all posts)
The Great Sugar Lo.. by wicklore   (Show all posts)
dhmiriam, it’s nic.. by padodes   (Show all posts)
Some very interest.. by pdtempan   (Show all posts)


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 28 Next page >>
Summit Summary
Cnoc an Bhráca: The last hurrah of the high Reeks
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker 19 hours ago.
Cnoc an Bhráca, together with its near neighbour Cnoc na DTarbh, are the last (relatively) high summits along the great ridge of the Eastern Reeks; beyond here the ground gradually declines to the...

  
User profile
WalkinIreland
WalkinIreland a day ago.
Walking Holiday Ireland provide self-guided hiking & guided walking tours in Ireland’s Ancient East and along the Wild Atlantic Way since 2012 for hiking & trekking enthusiasts from around t...

  
Summit Summary
Tievnabinnia: Bulky Sheeffrys summit
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker a day ago.
Tievnabinnia is the easternmost of the higher Sheeffry Hills, a distinctly bulky eminence where gently grassy upper slopes contrast with a series of steep corries to both north and south of its ge...

Summit Summary
Maumtrasna: A steep-sided fortress in the West
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Peter Walker 2 days ago.
Maumtrasna is one of the most singular mountains in Ireland, a monumental sprawl of plateau plunging away in viciously steep slopes around almost all of its perimeter; these slopes are themselves ...

  
Track
Near Slieve Foye North-West Top, Cooley/Gullion (Ireland)
Gus a day ago.
Tough ascent from the carpark, but once on the ridge is reasonably easy with an identifiable track. On the return kee... walk, Len: 8.7km, Climb: 413m, Area: Slieve Foye North-West Top, Cooley/Gullio

  
Summit Comment
Corn Hill: New Pathway around the Summit
TommyMc 4 days ago.
A new pathway around the summit has been installed over the summer. Walkers are now met with a locked gate within circa 50 yards of the masts and trig point, but a new and quite attractive pathway...

Track
Wicklow: Cullentragh Mountain
Onzy 5 days ago.
Easiest route to an hill that is really just a point on the way to Mullacor and beyond ... run, Len: 5.0km, Climb: 185m, Area: Cullentragh Mountain, Dublin/Wicklow (Irela...

  
Summit Comment
Kells Mountain East Top: Great hike up Kells East
BillWatson 6 days ago.
Three of us climbed this. My nephew cooled off in Roads Lough on the way up. The weather was nearly perfect. It was steep but manageable. This is my first entry on MV.

  
Summit Comment
Whiddy Island: Short island visit.
TommyV a week ago.
Whiddy Island is a short ferry ride from Bantry Bay. As I was under time constraints to be back on the mainland to watch Clare loose another Munster final, we made a quick walk from the quay to th...

Track
A Postcard from the Edge
mcrtchly a week ago.
This summer we spent 2 weeks in the Faroe Islands, a remote arrowhead-shaped archipelago of 18 basalt islands rising up walk, Len: 4.3km, Climb: 216m, Area: Faroe Islands, Nor?oyar ()

  
Summit Comment
Vinegar Hill: Steeped in history.
TommyV a week ago.
The history of this place takes precedence over the actual scenery but there are lovely views over the town of Enniscorthy.

  
Track
Croagh Patrick & Lugnademon
Onzy a week ago.
walk, Len: 7.1km, Climb: 756m, Area: Lugnademon, Croagh Patrick (Ireland) Lugna...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 28 Next page >>