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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
Bunsen7
2024-05-22 16:17:56
Kilbride Vs Imaal Firing Range Backstory
Interesting backstory here explaining that Imaal was selected over Kilbride because Seefin was not high enough.

https://m.independent.ie/regionals/wicklow/news/glen-of-imaal-marks-125-years-in-the-firing-line/a1570789326.html
simon3
2024-05-01 15:13:40
Donations Drive, now finished.
The donations drive that MV has been running for the last month is now complete for this year. The MV committee who receive the funds would like to express thanks to all who donated.
Such donations allow us to maintain our hosting and other services that we provide.
Should you wish to donate then you can use the menu option Home | Donate .. or go to url https://mountainviews.ie/donate/
Thanks.
murphysw
2024-02-26 15:20:24
"" from murphysw Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

Ireland's County Second Summits
I got an email recently from Miriam Kennedy as a result of completing the County Highpoints list. I didn't complete the survey in time, but it has got me thinking. The Seven Second Summits is considered a harder challenge than the Seven Summits, so I wondered what an Irish County version would be like. I couldn't find a listing anywhere, so I put together the attached list myself. Let me know if I've gotten any of them wrong!
mcrtchly
2024-02-25 18:52:24
"Snow Moon" from mcrtchly Contract pics
Picture: Snow Moon (Contract pics)

Snow Moon rise over Aghla More, Donegal
The full moon in February is called a Snow Moon. This year the Snow Moon occurred when the moon is at the apogee of it's orbit (furthest from Earth). This photo was captured rising above Aghla More on when descending from the Derryveaghs. Aptly the Derryveaghs and Aghlas were mantled in snow.
simon3
2024-02-10 06:56:21
MountainViews Gathering - 1st March
Hi All - a reminder that the Annual MountainViews Gathering is taking place on March 1st.

Date: Friday 1st March 2024
Location: The Talbot Hotel, Stillorgan Road, Co. Dublin, A94 V6K5
Time: 8pm (Doors open 7.30 pm)

Panellists, Awards, Talks and a bar for those that are interested in such things!

We've created an eventbrite page so that you can purchase tickets in advance -

https://mviews2024.eventbrite.ie

It would be helpful if you could purchase your ticket in advance so that we can keep an eye on numbers (payment on the night will be possible - although incase we are overrun with the hiking masses, try purchase your ticket in advance).

We hope to see you there!
Miriam
miriam
2024-01-28 16:48:13
"" from miriam Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

MountainViews Survey - Tell us what you think
A survey has been designed to collate feedback from MountainViews users about the Website and Newsletters. This is your chance to tell the MountainViews Committee what you think - we can then prioritise the work that needs to be done and also hear what you like about the current offering. If you haven't completed the survey yet, we would really value your input! Please copy and paste the link below to tell us what you think:

https://rcsiquality.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5anA2OZFM9yeuEu

Many Thanks,
Miriam
miriam
2024-01-28 16:29:53
"" from miriam Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

MountainViews Gathering - March 1st
Hi All - a reminder that the Annual MountainViews Gathering is taking place on March 1st.

Date: Friday 1st March 2024
Location: The Talbot Hotel, Stillorgan Road, Co. Dublin, A94 V6K5
Time: 8pm (Doors open 7.30 pm)

Panellists, Awards, Talks and a bar for those that are interested in such things!

We've created an eventbrite page so that you can purchase tickets in advance -

https://mviews2024.eventbrite.ie

It would be helpful if you could purchase your ticket in advance so that we can keep an eye on numbers (payment on the night will be possible - although incase we are overrun with the hiking masses, try purchase your ticket in advance).

We hope to see you there!
Miriam
Geo
2023-11-25 21:13:32
"Old man (of Storr)" from Geo Contract pics
Picture: Old man (of Storr) (Contract pics)

Skye Trail - July 2023
My Skye Trail
Most people do the trail from North to South, but I had organised permission to leave my car in the excellent Broadford community campsite on the south of the Isle.
Sunday 9am, with fair weather and the sun on my back, I was feeling strong and also had a great feed at Mrs. Mack's burger van on the coast road past the hamlet of Torrin. I made my mind up to keep going, plodding past the foot of the beautiful Bla Bheinn and on to Kilmarie. I took a shorter route over the hills to Camusunary Bay. By now the rain was on me. After 11 hours or so and over 30km of mixed terrain it was time to pitch camp on possibly one of the most beautiful shores I had ever seen. I slept like there was no tomorrow, the sound of the sea swishing through my dreams.
Next morning was wet so it was 10am when I broke camp. I had a lonely glen until I reached Sligachan, where I crossed the islandís main road. I pushed on, it was a day of several deep river crossings and my feet were soaked and beginning to hurt. By tea time I reached the cul de sac at the end of Loch Sligachan. Then a horrendous road walk to Portree campsite. 10 pm 30+ km and 12 hours after starting I was putting up my tent in the rain and wondering what the hell I had brought this misery on myself for.
Next morning, after some advice I decided to take the bus up to the North of the island and then walk back towards Portree, an unorthodox way of doing the trail but at least I'd finish in civilization! My feet were torn and bloody and I hobbled onto the bus in my crocs with my boots in my hand. I got off at the famous red phone box and sat in the grass trying to medicate my feet then hobbled for the first few kilometres, breaking every hour or so as my left shoulder was now throbbing with the 15kg rucksack. The saving grace was that it was my third day but my first without rain, and I had warm sun on my face. This was a beautiful coastal section, along gorgeous cliffs and on soft turf. I finished by the beautiful lakes at the foot of the atmospheric and Tolkienesque Quaraing, camping on the stony shore of a lake. A relatively short day of less than 20km and only about 6 hours walking. It was a superb wild camp, and sleep was no problem again.
Next day, was going to be the beast, another 30km day with nearly 2000m climbing up and down over a half dozen tough hills until I reached the Old Man of Storr. I managed it, but just before my last big climb I got enveloped in the cloud and the rain came back, heavy and ruthless. I was dog-tired and I sat down to ponder. Two lads going in the other direction stopped and asked my advice on continuing over where I had come from. I advised they retreat to lower ground to camp. I felt better so I pushed on, dusk falling as I dragged my sorry self by the Old Man of Storr. There was nowhere to camp so I set up literally on the path's edge, with the last sightseers to the rock pointing at me in my tent and some even taking pictures of the mad Irishman camping on a trail to the island's busiest beauty spot!
Poor sleep, I got up at 5am and although it was only about a 15km, 500m ascent day, I was in poor shape. The first few kms my feet had ultra pins and needles and I thought they would give way, but when I reached moorland it was easier. I had a couple of hills to negotiate but my mind was set on my finish in Portree. I met a couple from Wales who I walked the last section with. To be honest, although I was happy walking on my own the previous 4 days, having human interaction again at this point got me through those last few hours.
It was an anticlimactic feeling finishing. I was too tired to enjoy it, all I could imagine was a hot shower and the drive back home the next day. But in hindsight it was an incredible experience, 130km in 4 and a half days, superb scenery, marred somewhat by the awful rain but, still, for me a great achievement.
Colin Murphy
2023-09-19 15:16:03
"Passes with flying colours" from Colin Murphy Contract pics
Picture: Passes with flying colours (Contract pics)

At the end of the rainbow...
We all know the devastating effects of climate change, but in extremely rare cases, it can result in something that might be viewed as positive. One such case is to be found in Peru, and the amazing phenomenon of Rainbow Mountain (5,200m), 1000km SE of Lima in the Andes. Up until as recently as 2013, it was permanently covered in snow and ice, but due to rising temperatures, the mountainís beauty has been revealed. The colours are a result of 14 different mineral compositions, among them quartz, sandstone, iron, magnesium & sulphur. Nowadays snowfall is restricted to the winter months (June-August) and even then, the mountain is only partially covered.
It is possible to climb the mountain, but only in the company of a group and a local guide. The actual ascent takes about 3-4 hours.
Photo credit: Michaellbrawn
Colin Murphy
2023-09-19 11:37:10
"The view over the Zurichsee from the top" from Colin Murphy Contract pics
Picture: The view over the Zurichsee from the top (Contract pics)

A hillwalking opportunity next to Zurich
Anyone visiting Zurich who might fancy adding a short hillwalk to the their stay, might consider bagging a very mirror ĎAlpí called Uetliberg, which provides great views over the city, the Zurichsee Lake and the surrounding mountains. Itís a popular day trip for visitors as you can catch a train in central Zurich to Uetliberg Station, which leaves you just a 1km hike up through a forested hillside to the summit (451m). There is a bar/restaurant there to slake your thirst and multiple viewing points. You will also have the option of doing one of the multiple longer treks through the nearby forested hills.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .. 12 Next page >>
Summit Summary
Spinans Hill SE Top: Approach via Spinan's.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy 2 weeks ago.
Usually done in conjunction with the main top. There is now no access to this hill from the south (see comment on Spinan's Hill.) Follow route from the north to Spinan's, then turn SE and fol...

  
Summit Comment
Spinans Hill: Access issue
Colin Murphy 2 weeks ago.
The simplest and most popular route to this hill via a forest track from the south is now off-limits, with multiple signs forbidding entry. A longer approach may be made from the north.

  
Track
Mournes: Ramble to Doan from Silent Valley
Onzy 2 weeks ago.
walk, Len: 18.4km, Climb: 628m, Area: Mourne Mountains (Ireland) Doan||

Summit Summary
Spinans Hill: Access via a track from the north
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy 2 weeks ago.
Unfortunately the most popular access to this hill was from the south, but this is now not possible. A longer approach may be made from the north, starting at S92509 93197. Permission has pre...

  
Track
Double Carn track with some rough terrain
Colin Murphy 2 weeks ago.
Having discovered that our planned route from the south was now off limits (No Entry! Private Property! etc) we d... walk, Len: 7.3km, Climb: 442m, Area: Spinans Hill, Wicklow (Ireland) Spinans ||

  
Summit Comment
Croaghonagh: Another access problem?
Colin Murphy a month ago.
TommyV has previously reported that it was possible to drive all the way to the summit of this hill. Unfortunately this is no longer the case, as a chained gate with a 'Keep Out' sign has pre...

Track
Mournes: All the Binnians from Silent Valley
Onzy 3 weeks ago.
Descent to the Resevoir not to be recommended... walk, Len: 14.1km, Climb: 798m, Area: Slieve Binnian North Tor, Mourne Mountain...

  
Summit Comment
Montpelier Hill: Popular and well-loved amenity
hibby a month ago.
This hill is a very popular place to go for a walk on the weekends, thanks to its relative ease of ascent, its proximity to population centres, the interesting historical features at the summ...

  
Summit Summary
Cloghmeen Hill: Gives access to a splendid ridge.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy a month ago.
To get to the start take the minor road L1845 off the N56 at G924787 and go NW to Letterbarra and then N to G883869 where a minor road turns of left following the Bluestack Way. Go along it t...

Track
Ramble west of Clifden
Onzy 3 weeks ago.
Route joining Beach and Sky Roads as far west as Clifden Castle. A little off piste at the end to gain the road... walk, Len: 7.9km, Climb: 152m, Area: Galway Coastal Hill (Ireland) ||

  
Summit Summary
Crockuna: Pretty easy but rewarding Carn
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy a month ago.
Parking available at G 640 887 near McMonigle Stoneworks.Walk SW to G 63975 88685 to access Sli Cholmcille and follow Sli Cholmcille to a stile at G630 886. Cross fence and head directly sout...

  
Track
The Secret Waterfall
Colin Murphy a month ago.
This is a simple 2.5km return walk with a climb of just 50m, but itís well worth the effort if youíre in the Killybe walk, Len: 1.1km, Climb: 78m, Area: Donegal SW (Ireland) ||


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .. 12 Next page >>