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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
simon3
2005-04-08 13:16:15
A Wheen o' Whin
Ahh, whin. Whin (gorse or furze) featured in my nearly forgotten childhood in Northern Ireland. It was used to colour eggs at Easter. Before Bleck, another Scot said "Pit some gorse flooers in the watter when ye bile yer Easter egg and it’ll come oot a bonnie gowden broon." (Well some Scots may have said this).
Certainly there's a lot of whin about in Wicklow. I always associate it with south facing slopes where it shines yellow in the sun for a long season. Just as well if you believe the saying "that when the gorse is not in bloom, kissing is out of fashion."
Bleck Cra
2005-04-06 21:35:07
"Whin summer meets the Mournes" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: Whin summer meets the Mournes (Contract pics)
A Wheen o' Whin
Funny how as the highest ticket communicators on earth, we cling to our points of reference: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day” or “very like a whale”. But my unfavourite of all time is “Ah the whin: yes, just like vanilla or coconut ….” or some other scandalous comparison. The truth is, the underplayed scent of whin is so fantastical, so captivatingly odd and distant, that it defies comparison. The whin is the most devilishly magical weed God (or his beloved light bearer) ever forked into this earth. If you plant sibling cuttings in the same ground, one will grow up, the other out. Rain the same rain on six cloned plants and watch 6 different interpretations emerge. John Joseph gives up and leaves them as windbreaks for indolent cattle; the buzzy bees float in them, all sheets to the wind; and the Reverend Doctor (and one-time photographer), threatens to set them on fire. If you do little more this weekend than get up, get up and fumble into whin country, to my two favourite whin loaneys: a minute into the Bloody Bridge Track, ex Newcastle or immediately on to the Trassey Track, ex Bryansford. It is here you will find yourself submerged in a sunshine yellow haze of eau de whin, that will transport you into a world of mists, dreams and memory. Boughs of it hung outdoors to ward off witches, the black reek of it burning ahead of battle; even a gnat’s of it in your whiskey for good measure and you can try this with it bound to a broom handle, when the priests and prelates are a-bed. Sweep east to west and repeat after me 'out with evil, from this house, as the sun travels bring us peace'
everpresent
2005-04-06 14:19:02
Mountain/Tail suggestions
Wow! I wish I would have found this site months ago. I'm planning a hiking trip to ireland for the entire month of may. I plan on spending a week or so around the dublin/wicklow area then moving across the island and spending the rest of the time in Mayo/Galway/Kerry area. I'm looking for non-touristy mountains and trails with good scenery. Any suggestions from those who have been in these areas? Unfortunatly I'm making this trip alone so I've already conceded to myself that I won't bring my climing gear. This time around I'm going to just stick to walking/hiking/camping. Also, any good ruins in these areas?
Claude Hopper
2005-04-04 22:19:03
Gaiters
Great stuff in the gaiter department. I hope Berghaus and others are all watching. I love nicholamc's cable ties setup and as for simon3's curtain cables, I expect soon to learn how to make a breathable jacket out of a table cloth. Maps. Save yourself a lot of blood pressure later on by a simple trick now. Get the map home, lay it out on the kitchen table and set about folding it along every X and every Y line. This will take about 15 minutes and half way through, you will want to give up. But don't, because when it comes to locating the day's route and fitting the map into a sleeve you will be the only one able to do this with your map in seconds, while the rest of the team are still going fifteen rounds with theirs.
nicholamc
2005-04-04 09:18:53
Gaiters
Here's another way of fixing gaiters under the boot to add to Claude's. Just loop together two cable ties and fasten to both sides of the gaiter (like a figure of 8). I have done this on mine and it works a treat and so far is lasting really well. The cable ties can be pulled to the right length for a snug fit and the surplus clipped off to keep the connection tidy.
simon3
2005-04-03 17:07:39
Gaiters
Here's a couple of other ways of fixing gaiters under the boot to add to Claude's. You can buy some thin elastic from a haberdashers (if you can find one nowadays). Every so long the stuff breaks and you just cut some more and put it on. There was a discussion about this in that paragon of erudition the UK newsgroup (uk.rec.walking) not so long ago and someone said their solution was to use expanding curtain wire. (The sort of long spring you - or at least your mother - use to hang up lace curtains). I've never tried it, but I pass it on.
Claude Hopper
2005-04-03 11:11:20
Another trick of the trade. Gaiters again. Most gaiters today come with a rubber strap set in buckles. This is a clumsy awkward thing, has to be cut to size and after all that , a couple of sharp rocks and it's kaput. If you try to replace it with some sort of fabric, the same thing happens and also it picks up claudes of packed snow. The answer? Acquire a pair of leather laces. Loopknot each on the instep buckle of the gaiter, draw them through the outside buckle and finish in a simple reef knot and cut off the surplus. Do this when they're very dry and the knot will stay in. You'll get a whole season out of them and maybe more - and because there are two strands to them, if one strand goes, chances are the other will hold for the rest of the day. Any other tricks ?
CaptainVertigo
2005-04-02 11:17:09
"TINTERN ABBEY" from CaptainVertigo Contract pics
Picture: TINTERN ABBEY (Contract pics)

LINES COMPOSED A FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY -WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
(Comrades. If we are serious about hill walking we must steep our feeble minds in appropriate works of art. I humbly offer extracts from W.Wordworth's piece for your renewed consideration. )

For nature then (The coarser pleasures of my boyish days And their glad animal movements all gone by) To me was all in all. I cannot paint What then I was. The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion; the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colors and their forms, were then to me An appetite; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, not any interest Unborrowed from the eye. That time is past, And all its aching joys are now no more, And all its dizzy raptures. Not for this Faint I, nor mourn nor murmur; other gifts Have followed; for such loss, I would believe, Abundant recompense. For I have learned To look on nature, not as in the hour Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes The still sad music of humanity, Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power To chasten and subdue. And I have felt A presence that disturbs me with the joy Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime Of something far more deeply interfused, Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns, And the round ocean and the living air, And the blue sky, and in the mind of man: A motion and a spirit, that impels All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods, And mountains; and of all that we behold From this green earth; of all the mighty world Of eye, and ear both what they half create, And what perceive; well pleased to recognize In nature and the language of the sense The anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse, The guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul Of all my moral being.
simon3
2005-04-01 21:00:11
Seanachai -- I had a look at Knockaunapeebra .. the trouble with considering it as a summit is that it's prominence ( the amount it sticks out above the surrounding ground) is only about 20 metres or so as far as one can judge from sheet 75 so it has to be regarded as a spur of Fauscoum. Now I appreciate that we say that the list includes summits with a drop of 15m, however we are in the process of changing this to 30m. (about 100ft) to cut out some of the sillier "summits".
seanachai
2005-04-01 17:02:17
Simon

Would you consider adding a summit in the Comeraghs? Knockaunapeebra, 726 metres, S313097.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 11 Next page >>
Track
Slieve Muck Slievenaglogh Doan and Ott
ceadeile 18 hours ago.
This is a fairly short route (13 kms) but the ascent (approx 900 m) and the toughness of some of the ground trave... walk, Len: 12.8km, Climb: 982m, Area: Slieve Muck, Mourne Mountains (Ireland) |...

  
Forum: Suggestions
Re Kanturk
simon3 a day ago.
It's definetely on the website.Note. Mountainviews added some places to Paul's list.https://mountainviews.ie/summit/1469/You are welcome to propose additional names etc using the Propose Places Da...

  
Forum: General
Covid 19 & 2KM Radiu
simon3 a day ago.
Great question moggy40Can we assume that this 2k must be centred on a regular dwelling place.

Summit Comment
Annacoona Top: Meandering approach from Glencar
ochils_trekker 2 days ago.
I climbed Slievemore and Annacoona Top last September, but took an accidentally rambling approach as I hadn't consulted Mountainviews properly before leaving my accommodation in Sligo town. As I k...

  
Track
Glenariff Waterfalls Walk
Peter Walker 3 days ago.
In those fairytale days before we weren't allowed to go anywhere that we couldn't walk to from our front doors, walk, Len: 3.2km, Climb: 163m, Area: Antrim Hills (Ireland) ||

  
Summit Comment
Ridge of Capard: Bluebells April 2019
melohara 4 days ago.
The Slieve Blooms have a few redeeming features - one of them is the carpet of bluebells in Capard Wood during late April or early May.Video on you tube at https://youtu.be/zupEPlUVZDs

Track
Old School Slieve Carr route, with Tawnyanruddia
markwallace a week ago.
Due to its status as Probably the Most Remote Mountain in Ireland, I have wanted to climb Slieve Carr for a while. I... walk, Len: 29.3km, Climb: 1071m, Area: North Mayo (Ireland) Tawnyanruddia, Sl||

  
Summit Summary
Cushbawn: Pleasant walk to unmarked summit.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 5 days ago.
Just past the fake village of Macreddin heading north, there is room to park for a couple of cars on the right.Go south about 300m on the road until you come to Macreddin Bridge Follow the track o...

  
Track
Slieve Maan to Croaghanmoira Circuit
march-fixer a week ago.
In view of the COVID-19 warnings, we decided to pick an out of the way route that would hopefully provide plenty of ... walk, Len: 12.4km, Climb: 666m, Area: Slieve Maan, Dublin/Wicklow (Ireland) S||

Summit Comment
Ballycumber Hill: Decent little Carn doesn't demand too much.
Colin Murphy 5 days ago.
A relatively easy ascent mostly up decent tracks. Followed the suggested route from Mangan's Lane (which I discovered is opposite the entrance to the local GAA Club.) It was a fine spring day so I...

  
Track
A "Holy" fantastic Path
march-fixer 2 weeks ago.
In olden days Mass Paths were the most direct routes to and from the local churchs. This path leads south from Blackrock walk, Len: 1.4km, Climb: 217m, Area: Dublin/Wicklow (Ireland) ||

  
Forum: General
Covid 19 & 2KM Radius
moggy40 a day ago.
Given that we are all restricted to a 2KM radius for exercise activity, where in Ireland would be the best place to be located, your starting point for your walk must be within your radius, and be...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 11 Next page >>