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General Whatever you want to say that doesn't fit under the comments about places or another forum.
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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
AidanB
2005-03-16 14:54:40
Can anyone help me with this: I was recently given a rather nice second hand GPS unit. I was very impressed with it until I realised that the Irish OS grid references it gives are from 1965 and are about 1km out from the current OS maps.
I am traditionally a map and compass navigator and pretty handy at it too, so I need some convincing of the value of this unit or I might just put it on E-Bay.. can anyone advise?
(PS I already tried this on another forum and was inundated by GPS geeks who were convinced I needed a GPS to get to the local shops... not what I'm looking for)
Bleck Cra
2005-03-14 22:12:27
ricky k - Shirley is off to Nepal. She fell down her own stairs a few weeks back and dislocated her shoulder, so she had to restrict herself to running up and down Cavehill (sure I doubt if I could run down it once), yet now she's off, in a snowstorm of stuffed-shirt advice from every expert on the planet, but she's gone to Nepal and they haven't. She was just saying that your brief encouraging comment was great. Of course motleyviews wasn't invented back then and Shirl coming from North Belfast where no one says boo to a goose (sic) was a too shy to reply. Aw shucks .....
Claude Hopper
2005-03-14 21:53:45
Hello bfawcus, we have much in common, like the reasonably fit, but especially the middle aged. Also like yourselves I came to Eire late, having spent many years in the hills in Britain. There are many contributors on this very good website better qualified than I to advise. All I should say is one of your nearest points also happens to be the highest hill in Ireland and also some impressive tops around it. Pick up a map of MacGillycuddy's Reeks and it will point you towards the best walking scrambling and climbing in Ireland and for all levels. I would definitely recommend John Murray's version with map and excellent booklet accompanying.
bfawcus
2005-03-01 22:29:37
Can anyone recommend any interesting walks/scrambles within easy reach of Beaufort / Killarney? We are middle-aged but reasonably fit and have done the likes of Snowdon, Tryfyn, etc, but haven't been in Eire before!
Bleck Cra
2005-03-01 17:50:07
"" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)
Ah sure, you never have to wait long. Currently scouring the Mournes for a fitness level suitable for a Women’s Cancer Charity Challenge, is a small, scrubbed, desperate critter whom we shall call “Dotty”, (for fear of getting my bake knocked in). I met her a couple of weeks back, knocking Donard’s bake in. She is loud, straightforward, has as much interest in the cache of the sport as fly and calls a spade a spade - well almost. This Saturday I met her on the Brandy Pad below the Castles. “Here he comes!” she shouts to her companion, unaffected that we have only ever met once before. This companion is Eastern European, stunning, with a ring through her conk, a hundredweight hank of hair in a ponytail and an accent that would melt Alec Ferguson’s dentures. Indulge me this detail. After a lot of slapping and thumping, Dot, perhaps to me, perhaps to Ninochka, perhaps to no one at all, aims a sweeping gesture towards Slieve Beg and assures “That is Cove” and to Cove, “That is Beg. And which one is La Manga?” I paused …. for oxygen. “That’ll be the one around Andalucia somewhere”, I thought. Nina smiled at me, no doubt fluent in sixteen languages and a first in Cartography. “Hah” I said, trying to say “Ah”. “Hah - that is Slieve Beg, that one Cove Mountain and that one (nice and clearly now) is Lamagan. “Yes” says Dotters, “Lumumum.” And I thought, the price we have paid to bask in the sweet warm mud of our modern world is innocence - good on you girl: call it what you like. Go bag it and bag it again - and one day she will overtake us…., when running up “La Manga”. Pic North of La Manga.
evelyn
2005-03-01 15:28:27
Has anybody got problems with rights of way? I use the countryside quite a bit, whether by hoof, paw or boot, and recently I came across a situation which was resolved by communication. On hoof, my friends and I used a "mass path" which was between fields and did not cross any fenced land from a small track to a small road - about half a mile in length. The right of way is registered and was open for many years until a security issue was raised as an elderly gentleman's house was burgled who lived in a house on the track, also the track became notorious for after hours enjoyment, the used and discarded proof was left for all to see. The gentleman and his neighbour set about erecting a security gate so that absolutely nobody could get along the right of way. But, after a meeting, the security gate now has a space wide enough for large horses and the land owners are happy for hoof paw and boot to tread the path.
SDillmore
2005-03-01 09:35:32
Thanks all for the input. He obeys well, so I'll plan on taking him to more isolated peaks. Cheers.
evelyn
2005-02-28 08:58:41
Hi SDillmore! As I generally walk alone, so that I can get away from the rat race, I take my four legged friends with me for security and peace of mind. Having an agricultural background I have witnessed what a pack of dogs can do to a flock of sheep, which were my own stock, so I have a strict personal code! In forestry and where there are no little people, or wildlife, my dogs are loose but with easily catchable restraints (harnasses) just in case the situation changes! On moorland, my dogs are leashed as there are sometimes sheep grazing, if I see a large amount of sheep I don't go near them I go another route which can be just as enjoyable!! Where a farmer has put up a notice that they have stock on the land and would prefer that dogs are not permitted, I will NOT enter that land ..... another day another time without my dogs! During the early months of the year sheep are quite often expecting, and as such should definitely not be bothered by dogs leashed or unleashed, as they can abort or even worse! Personally if you use your common sense, and say to yourself "if those were my sheep........" you'll be fine! One other thing, if you see a sheep upside down and unable to right itself at this time of year PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE help the animal to right itself, as it's easy prey!
Bleck Cra
2005-02-28 00:21:16
Hello Michael. Suggest you refer to gerrym, contributor to mountainviews who is in bed with the Sperrins to the same carnal extent as I am with Mournes. I kind of think once you have his sort of handle on them, they will come good for you. For myself, their endless nothingness spooks me and three lashes at them has done me with them for good. The towns along their Southern edge are however (what do you think Gerry ….) interesting …. and a good place for a political discussion - or perhaps not. I would go with gerrym ref Goles route, where you can make the most of things (excuse my weariness). The best way I should describe the Sperrins is that they are truly beautiful, from the ground.
Michael McA
2005-02-26 00:58:06
Can anyone recommend any good walks in the Sperrins?

A group of friends intend to get together in a couple of weeks for a walk up there and although I’ve done plenty of walks in the Mournes I’ve done next to nothing in the Spirrens. The others would be of reasonable fitness but not much walking experience, so a walk of no more than about 4 hours would be intended.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 18 Next page >>
Forum: General
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simon3 5 hours ago.
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Peter Walker 5 days ago.
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David-Guenot 2 days ago.
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TommyMc 6 days ago.
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Summit Comment
Largan Hill: Having it Largan
madfrankie a week ago.
In an effort to avoid the unpleasant tree-stuff described previously, I decided to make an alternative approach. At the western end of Lough Talt I took a minor road at G38776815942 that skirts th...

  
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Buachaille Etive Mor (mostly)
Peter Walker a week ago.
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Summit Comment
Inishturk: A quiet place
TommyV a week ago.
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Summit Comment
Cuilcagh: A classy mountain
hazyview 3 days ago.
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Knockastia: Most central hill in Ireland??
TommyV a week ago.
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Cupidstown Hill: One for the County High Pointers only!
TommyV a week ago.
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mcrtchly a week ago.
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RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 18 Next page >>