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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
Bleck Cra
2005-03-22 22:41:32
"" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

Two consecutive days of sunshine and enter Newcastle Saturday, Pacific-rim four-by-fours as Panzer divisions enter Poland - prerequisites to dropping Doris at Lidl, transporting toots to Granny’s and essential for sitting at the kerb, being ….. big: big enough to deliver the Ponderosa its entire stock of longhorn. And flying pigs. And so it pleases us to rise above this milieu, literally and some might venture (fearless of contradiction)…. socially. I couldn’t comment. To effect this …. “repositioning” and also enjoy a whole new experience, suivez moi. What the Mournes can present in comfort, safety and special features, they can lose in wilderness, not from viewpoints like Pigeon Rock, the Carn/Ott-nots and such, but from within. There are few hotspots in their heartland where their boundless emptiness fills an addled head with visions of Yetis and Loch Ness Monsters. And so my heart did a big lep when it found itself vacuumed from a vast carpet of cloud, on to a magical new world of heathen barrenness, hare, raven and skylark. Beneath, cold enough to hang meat. Above only 400ms, fierce enough to fry chips. First, hang a left, South over the Midpace Burn; threaten a dodgy hip and make off over wind-thin barbed wire fences. Methinks here be Tony Martins - stay vigilant. At a casual stroll in this foreign heat, perhaps the hint of fresh-ground coffee and Pastisse, soon to be overtaken by wafts of sizzling polartec and deep fried neck. Hot, hot, hot …. but at all points, no wall, no track, and with the cloud beneath, apparently no land or sea either, but bold, wide inclines through nascent heather and hot flat rock, to place summer orders for floral armchairs and boggling scenes of hill, dale, sand and sea. Locus: Slievenagarragh our most Easterly Mourne.
simon3
2005-03-22 20:31:42
David -- that geology sounds very interesting. Could I make one suggestion? Why not make an entry in our Bibliography section for the magazine and the website of ES2k which will make the information more accessible into the future. If you had the details for a good book on the subject of use to walkers, it could
go there also.
David Kirk
2005-03-22 15:17:04
Do you guys realise that when you stride manfully (sorry – personfully) along Slieve League’s airy ridge you are walking on what was once an Antarctic seabed? As you grunt up Carrauntoohil, just be thankful – 250 million years ago it was 3000 metres high, not just its present easy 1,000. These gems of invaluable knowledge are the sort of things that can add a lot of interest to your ramblings if you learn something of the geology of our mountains, the story of how the wonderful landscapes we walk over came to be. There are plenty of good books out there now, and even a series of geo-trail guides to get you started. ES2k (Earth Science 2000), is an organisation promoting the landscapes-are-more-than-wet-feet movement. Membership is free, as is its excellent twice-yearly magazine. To get both contact magazine editor Tony Bazley (tonybazley@csma-netlink.co.uk) and you can visit its website www.habitas.org.uk/es2k. The two Geological Surveys in Ireland also have superbly informative websites – www.gsi.ie and www.bgs.ac.uk/gsni. Go on - be a rock-hound!
danhughes1234uk
2005-03-22 14:07:54
Thanks hughm - that's great news!
hughm
2005-03-22 10:25:33
In response to danhughes1234uk, posted 2005-03-21 10:25:54.
Dan, OSi are currently developing a CD based navigation product for the outdoor enthusiast. The product will provide various mapping scales (including 1:50,000 and aerial photography) of selected regions around the country. It will provide 3D views and transfer of routes to and from GPS and PDA. It will be available in the shops in Aug/Sept this year.
Bleck Cra
2005-03-21 21:12:41
"" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

Cap V: And the Lord said, I have surely seen the affliction of my people which are in Navan.
And I am come down to deliver them up out of that land unto a good land and a large, unto a land flowing with milk and honey; unto the place of the Canaanites, the O’Kanennites, the Savages and O’Hares.
Cap, Ship and the rest of the crew: Wilkommen et Bienvenue to the promised land.
jackill
2005-03-21 15:16:39
AidanB - I have been using a Garmin GPS for the last few months and as csd has suggested it can be an invaluable tool in bad weather conditions. Could I suggest that you check that you are entering the correct national grid reference letter in front of the coordinates. I made this error myself when I started using my unit and only realised it when standing at the foot of Beenakeragh, the gps told me I was 50 miles away. I have the Garmin Vista manual as a .pdf file (2.5 mb in size ) I could email it to you if you like or post it to you on CD .
danhughes1234uk
2005-03-21 10:25:54
Folks, I have a question about digital maps that I don't know if anyone can help me on. I've always been very happy with my map and compass as a way of planning and navigating routes.

recently however, I was at a friends house in North Wales, and he showed me his memory map software of Snowdonia. I have to say, I was really impressed at the way it gives you all these 3D views to help you plan your routes out. It really is a nice tool. But as with all these things you can buy maps for the UK and US but that seems to be about your lot.

Has anyone found a way of getting OSI maps (or equivalent!) into some such package? I checked out the OSI website but although it does mention digital maps I got the idea it was aimed more at the professional market..
AidanB
2005-03-18 10:21:59
CSD I think you've hit the nail on the head there, the chances are that I'm not using it properly, and you see that's why I'm looking for help! I think I have most of it figured out (no manual just a quick reference guide). You are probably right about the 1965 thing but it still gives a grid ref about 1km N/NE of where I plot on an OS map. If you can suggest some way of correcting this I will be well chuffed and won't try floggin it to Claude Hopper!! (Unit is a Garmin Vista if that's any help). Thanks.
csd
2005-03-17 11:30:32
AidanB, I don't mean to sound condescending, but are you sure you're using the GPS unit correctly? The "Ireland 1965" probably refers to the OS datum, not the grid, and is still in use today. I've used GPS units from Garmin and Magellan, and they've never had problems with the grid. While it will never replace map and compass skills, I've found having a GPS invaluable on a couple of occasions when stuck in fog.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 19 Next page >>
Summit Comment
An Cnoc Fada: The majesty of the Poisoned Glen in the snow
mcrtchly 8 hours ago.
A snowy day gives a different perspective on the Poisoned Glen and Crockfadda. This photo was taken with a 500mm lens at a distance of 1.5km from the Scared Heart Church and 8km from the the Poiso...

  
Summit Comment
Tomies Mountain: Light on Tomies and Purple
davsheen 11 hours ago.
Tomies and Purple in the Light from Muckross

  
Summit Comment
Derrygarriff: Free as a bird
Colin Murphy 6 days ago.
We were lucky to see a white tailed eagle gliding gracefully over Eirk Lough before before coming to rest on a rock, which provided the opportunity to capture a pic of the rarely seen bird of prey...

Track
The Beara-Breifne Way Day 6
mlmoroneybb 3 days ago.
Thanks to all for making the weekends on the Beara-Breifne Way so special. We have completed 187Km in 7 Day?s walking walk, Len: 30.3km, Climb: 781m, Area: Paps/Derrynasaggart (Ireland)

  
Forum: General
Enjoy your trip
BleckCra 3 days ago.
The first flurry of snow here in Armagh. A biting wind. Antenna whiskers taste the chill air and the prospect of picture postcard winter days. In no time at all, the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue will...

  
Summit Comment
Foardal: Beyond a shadow of a doubt
Colin Murphy 6 days ago.
The French writer Maupassant used to say he had lunch in the Eiffel Tower every day because it was the only place in Paris that he couldn't see the thing. A similar view might be taken of Foardal,...

Track
The Beara-Breifne Way Day7
mlmoroneybb 3 days ago.
On Sunday, we were not attacked by the MacCarthys of Drishane Castle but started our walk on the O?Keefe Booning Castl walk, Len: 27.7km, Climb: 362m, Area: Paps/Derrynasaggart (Ireland)

  
Track
The Beara-Breifne Way Day5
mlmoroneybb 3 days ago.
Day 5 we set out for Ballyvourney where some of us put our cupla focail to good use. Along this trail we came across man walk, Len: 23.4km, Climb: 483m, Area: Shehy/Knockboy (Ireland)

  
Forum: General
Hillocks
BleckCra 5 days ago.
Simon. Himself is the well known to some, Bernard Hill. Less well known of course are hills to do with ants, except to some. Keep er lit though. At least some sort of discussion and of course only...

Summit Summary
Foardal: Simple approach from NW
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy 6 days ago.
If you want to do this in isolation, the simplest route is from the car park at V882790, and then heading SE directly up the heathery slope for 1km. The summit itself is a broad heathery mound.

  
Track
The Beara-Breifne Way Day4
mlmoroneybb 3 days ago.
The Saturday trek started in the scenic village of Glengarriff. From here a short boat trip brought some of our members... walk, Len: 27.5km, Climb: 783m, Area: Shehy/Knockboy (Ireland) Foilastookeen

  
Summit Summary
Derrygarriff: Fine summit, easily reached.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy 6 days ago.
There are access issues around Moll's Gap, so suggest starting at car park at V882790 and proceeding up the heathery slopes to Foardal - about 1km to the SE, before walking the 1.5km to the SW to ...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 19 Next page >>