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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
Claude Hopper
2005-03-29 20:03:24
I have spent many years up hills, down hills, across bog and sometimes in it and have learnt and devised many tricks about making equipment safer and easier and I’d love to hear other tricks of the trade. So I’m going to kick off with gaiters (well you would). The easiest gaiters are zipped at the front and worth spending a bit more on, but be careful you don’t spend too much just because of a trendy brand. Putting on back-zipped gaiters might also put your back out. The best should go up to just below your knee with a bit of slack, but try them out because sizes can be very odd and XL can mean medium. Some have an annoying habit of coming unzipped and the tighter you make it, the more it unzips. So take the lace and thread it through the tab of the zip and then through a spring toggle. This tightens the gaiter and also keeps it up. Any more tricks of the trade ?
Bleck Cra
2005-03-29 19:29:52
"Newcastle: built on the back of these hills." from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: Newcastle: built on the back of these hills. (Contract pics)

I am interested to read Captain Vertigo’s piece about access in Wicklow. It is balanced and careful. Of the case, I know only what he relates - but I have mountain-sized views on the subject. Too many of us opine that country access should be free and that it’s the mark of some foul, suppressive force, that it is not. Firstly “access” is our word for someone else’s road or through-route for ancient trade or communication. We are very late on the scene to be claiming it for ourselves. These great outdoors exist not for our spiritual uplift, but as real workplaces and vehicles to support the produce of hard-working and frequently put-upon farmers; and we need to be heart thankful for the opportunity to “borrow” them. Incidentally, anyone who thinks they can claim access as a RIGHT from PJ Giles by shouting and flapping placards will quickly be disabused of the notion. I grew up in Scotland’s agricultural heartland - Galloway and I know that breed of farmer and landowner to have a business mind that makes the sharpest suit look like Wilkins Micawber, but it needs none of that acumen to calculate that if it makes money, you can “advance friend”; if it costs money you must “retreat foe”. So what has happened in the Wicklow Hills? Have we been crapping in our own nest? I ask because there is nothing in CV’s piece (or perhaps not anywhere) that tells us why the council were (if not still) en route to closing/re-defining these “ways”. There are only 2 suspects: no profitable friends or too many costly foes. In the Mourne Mountains everyone loves the hillwalkers - because in the towns they spend a fortune and some of that goes back amongst the sugar lumps in Sweeney’s pocket.
AidanB
2005-03-29 11:45:52
All is well, I reset everything and lo and behold it was spot on. Not sure what was wrong but it's better now (won't throw out the Sheet 56 just yet though).
CaptainVertigo
2005-03-29 00:29:47
"Pat Vance, F.F.,Wicklow County CouncilWicklow County CouncilEmail: PVance@wicklowcoco.ie" from CaptainVertigo Contract pics
Picture: Pat Vance, F.F.,Wicklow County CouncilWicklow County CouncilEmail: PVance@wicklowcoco.ie (Contract pics)
In mid March 2005 Wicklow County Council agreed to delete a total of 33 existing access routes (including some of the best-known walking routes in the county) from the county development plan.

A special policy committee on planning chaired by Fianna Fail's Pat Vance will make its final report by June when it is expected that the majority of these routes may be inserted back into the development plan
Cllr Vance told council members that a great deal of good work had been achieved since the committee was set up last year and that the vast majority of landowners and interested parties involved were willing to deal with the council in a spirit of cooperation.

'We are consulting with a number of groups and have reached 95 per cent agreement on four to six of the 33 routes already. The major issue that keeps coming up is insurance and maintenance of access routes,' Cllr Vance said.

'We have discussed this with the law agent and reckon we could handle both of those issues which is a big break through. Of course, the insurance and maintenance will only be provided on agreed access routes,' he said.

Cllr Vance acknowledged that a number of difficulties would have to be overcome if all routes were to be agreed upon, but if those involved applied the same attitude as those already spoken to, then Cllr Vance was relatively confident that the majority could be agreed upon by June.

'We are approaching this in the way of partnership and agreement and are not trying to foist access routes on people who do not want them.'

The access routes had initially come before the council last July and were included in the plan by council management much to the annoyance of some councillors.

Proposing their omission from the development plan, Independent Cllr Christopher Fox said a lot of misinformation had been bandied about in relation to the access routes. 'I would like to remove them from the plan and let the committee get on with its job,' he said.

Glendalough based Cllr Pat Casey said the matter needed to be resolved from a tourism point of view. He stated that three other routes not included in the original list of 33 should also be excluded from the development plan.

'There is no point treating these three routes any differently and we should remove them also,' he said. However, this proposal was later rejected by the acting county manager, Bryan Doyle who said that only the routes that had been advertised could be removed from the development plan at this stage.

Meanwhile, Cllr Pat Doran said he was delighted with the progress that had been made to date but argued that a proper code of conduct would have to be introduced to protect both the rights of walkers and those of landowners. 'Without a proper code of conduct we will not get the agreement of landowners,' he claimed. Acting council chairman, Andrew Doyle of Fine Gael echoed the comments of his colleagues by saying a great deal of progress had been made on the issue in recent months.

'I was hesitant about this variation coming forward but I hope that up to 20 of the routes can be put back in by June,' he said.

'They may be called something else but we are hopeful that we can get agreement on them. 'The committee that has been set up is dealing with this in a positive manner and there is a willingness by all concerned to address this in a positive manner,' Cllr Doyle concluded.

The matter was put to a vote and the deletion of the 33 access routes from the county development plan was carried 13 votes for, two against.http://www.wicklow.ie/planning/devplan%20maps/map12B.jpg
csd
2005-03-25 18:30:23
Aidan, I've never had the problem you describe with my Garmin eTrex. One thing you could try is updating the firmware, in case there is some strange bug in the software on your unit. New versions of the units' software are available from the Garmin website.
Bleck Cra
2005-03-22 22:41:32
"" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: (Contract pics)

Two consecutive days of sunshine and enter Newcastle Saturday, Pacific-rim four-by-fours as Panzer divisions enter Poland - prerequisites to dropping Doris at Lidl, transporting toots to Granny’s and essential for sitting at the kerb, being ….. big: big enough to deliver the Ponderosa its entire stock of longhorn. And flying pigs. And so it pleases us to rise above this milieu, literally and some might venture (fearless of contradiction)…. socially. I couldn’t comment. To effect this …. “repositioning” and also enjoy a whole new experience, suivez moi. What the Mournes can present in comfort, safety and special features, they can lose in wilderness, not from viewpoints like Pigeon Rock, the Carn/Ott-nots and such, but from within. There are few hotspots in their heartland where their boundless emptiness fills an addled head with visions of Yetis and Loch Ness Monsters. And so my heart did a big lep when it found itself vacuumed from a vast carpet of cloud, on to a magical new world of heathen barrenness, hare, raven and skylark. Beneath, cold enough to hang meat. Above only 400ms, fierce enough to fry chips. First, hang a left, South over the Midpace Burn; threaten a dodgy hip and make off over wind-thin barbed wire fences. Methinks here be Tony Martins - stay vigilant. At a casual stroll in this foreign heat, perhaps the hint of fresh-ground coffee and Pastisse, soon to be overtaken by wafts of sizzling polartec and deep fried neck. Hot, hot, hot …. but at all points, no wall, no track, and with the cloud beneath, apparently no land or sea either, but bold, wide inclines through nascent heather and hot flat rock, to place summer orders for floral armchairs and boggling scenes of hill, dale, sand and sea. Locus: Slievenagarragh our most Easterly Mourne.
simon3
2005-03-22 20:31:42
David -- that geology sounds very interesting. Could I make one suggestion? Why not make an entry in our Bibliography section for the magazine and the website of ES2k which will make the information more accessible into the future. If you had the details for a good book on the subject of use to walkers, it could
go there also.
David Kirk
2005-03-22 15:17:04
Do you guys realise that when you stride manfully (sorry – personfully) along Slieve League’s airy ridge you are walking on what was once an Antarctic seabed? As you grunt up Carrauntoohil, just be thankful – 250 million years ago it was 3000 metres high, not just its present easy 1,000. These gems of invaluable knowledge are the sort of things that can add a lot of interest to your ramblings if you learn something of the geology of our mountains, the story of how the wonderful landscapes we walk over came to be. There are plenty of good books out there now, and even a series of geo-trail guides to get you started. ES2k (Earth Science 2000), is an organisation promoting the landscapes-are-more-than-wet-feet movement. Membership is free, as is its excellent twice-yearly magazine. To get both contact magazine editor Tony Bazley (tonybazley@csma-netlink.co.uk) and you can visit its website www.habitas.org.uk/es2k. The two Geological Surveys in Ireland also have superbly informative websites – www.gsi.ie and www.bgs.ac.uk/gsni. Go on - be a rock-hound!
danhughes1234uk
2005-03-22 14:07:54
Thanks hughm - that's great news!
hughm
2005-03-22 10:25:33
In response to danhughes1234uk, posted 2005-03-21 10:25:54.
Dan, OSi are currently developing a CD based navigation product for the outdoor enthusiast. The product will provide various mapping scales (including 1:50,000 and aerial photography) of selected regions around the country. It will provide 3D views and transfer of routes to and from GPS and PDA. It will be available in the shops in Aug/Sept this year.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 20 Next page >>
Track
Ballyhoura 3 Tops
David-Guenot an hour ago.
walk, Len: 6.9km, Climb: 363m, Area: Seefin Mountain E Top, Ballyhoura Mountain...

  
Track
Moanlaur Ridge
David-Guenot an hour ago.
walk, Len: 13.6km, Climb: 754m, Area: Lack Mountain, Slieve Mish (Ireland) Lack...

  
Track
Mount Brandon S Ridge from Conor Pass
David-Guenot an hour ago.
walk, Len: 22.4km, Climb: 1603m, Area: An Bhinn Dubh, Brandon Group (Ireland) A...

Track
Mount Brandon N Ridge from Brandon Village
David-Guenot an hour ago.
walk, Len: 24.4km, Climb: 1313m, Area: Brandon Group (Ireland) Piaras Mor thuai...

  
Track
Beenoskee-Dromavally traverse
David-Guenot an hour ago.
walk, Len: 24.0km, Climb: 1373m, Area: Beenatoor, Central Dingle (Ireland) Been...

  
Track
Caherbla
David-Guenot an hour ago.
walk, Len: 2.6km, Climb: 330m, Area: Caherbla, Slieve Mish (Ireland) Caherbla

Summit Comment
Aughinish: Clare Island
sandman 5 days ago.
This island is located in County Clare but can only be accessed via County Galway. Originally connected to Clare but the connection was lost in 1755 as a result of an earthquake The British built ...

  
Summit Comment
Lackabane: NE Spur
simon3 3 days ago.
The NE spur off Lackabane is something of a knife edge, descending steeply and with even steeper sides. Watch it on a poor day.

  
Summit Comment
Binn Mhairg: A well worthwhile but neglected scramble
IainT 5 days ago.
The quartzite slabs on the NE flank of Binn Mhairg make a good scramble, one of the best in the Maum Turks. They are reachable by traversing round from the Mam Ean track, pathless but largely gras...

Track
Clogrennan Hill is an easy walk.
simon3 5 days ago.
Clogrennan Hill. walk, Len: 0.9km, Climb: 11m, Area: Clogrennan Hill, South Midlands (Ireland) C...

  
Summit Comment
Scanlan's Island: Clare Island
sandman 5 days ago.
Access to the Island is via the gravel road/track located at M2575111537 .During low tide you have no problem driving on to the island and following the track to the left over concrete to within m...

  
Track
Cullenagh route.
simon3 5 days ago.
Apparently the road up Tinoran is owned or at least used by Coillte walk, Len: 6.6km, Climb: 113m, Area: Cullenagh Mountain, South Midlands (Irelan...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 20 Next page >>