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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
evelyn
2005-07-12 09:40:08
"The Monch" from evelyn Contract pics
Picture: The Monch (Contract pics)

Snow and Ice
Photo of the Monch, summit 4099m, from the Sphinx Observatory at 3550m. If you ever get here, make sure it's a glorious day like I had. Photo was taken on Sat 11th June 2005, had this view all to myself for about 1/2 hour.
simon3
2005-07-04 13:16:48
Geo differences between Mournes and WM
I'm not a geologist. As far as I know the differences are, as you say, mostly due to the much longer time that the Wicklow Mountains were around (350myears) as opposed to around 50m for the Mournes. I understand that once the Wicklows were much higher, however they have been ground down far more by erosion. The summits of the Mournes are thought to have been exposed just above the ice-sheet in some of the most recent glaciations and don't show the same sort of weathering as lower down the slopes or in the valleys. As far as I know the summits are the same granite as the rest of the Mournes. I understand there are several types of granite in the Mournes. Certainly I can't remember seeing the sort of pink granite that you get there is a few spots anywhere else I have walked. If you look at typical granite in Wicklow and then in the Mournes, there are far more cracks in Wicklow granite. The last few metres of Lugnaquillia are not made of granite, but of whatever the upwelling granite pushed up.
simon3
2005-07-04 13:03:23
"Comeraghs from the South" from simon3 Contract pics
Picture: Comeraghs from the South (Contract pics)

Google Earth
For those of us who do not have helicopters to fly around Ireland's mountains! If you are interested in seeing what the land may be like before you walk on it, you can get some idea from Google Earth. (Download at http://desktop.google.com/download/earth/index.html) This is somewhat similar to NASA WorldWind, though in my opinion it is better implemented.

Either service covers most of the world's landmass to a resolution of about 15m. The colour appears to mostly false colour, probably using green, red and near infra-red which can look a bit odd at times. This is good enough to see the general shape of the land, field boundaries, wider roads, some forest rides etc. It is not good enough to see most houses.

Unlike WorldWind, Google Earth allows you to put in your own points of interest.

As far as Ireland goes, there a few patches of the coverage which are at much higher resolution (I would guess 2 to 3m or so) including the Carrauntoohil area, which looks stunning. Many of the placenames are not quite in the right place and many are missing.

The attached visualisation gives an idea of what you can see in the Comeraghs. Certainly a better view than last weekend when a number of us were down for the Comeragh Crossing event.
andagda
2005-07-04 08:39:11
Geo differences between Mournes and WM
Hello all,

Can someone tell me why, although the Mournes and the Wicklow Mountinas are both granite intrusions, they look so different? Does it all come down to the fact the WM are much older?

- When it comes to erosion, the granite seems to split along rectangular fault lines in the Mournes. In Wicklow the hills are much more rounded. Why the difference?

- There are many core-stones all around the Mournes, including in numerous walls in the surrounding fields, but I don't think there are this many in Wicklow. Have all the Wicklow ones been eroded completely away because Wicklow is a much older range?

- Some of the tops of the Mournes are very dramatic, are these tops made of country stone or are they also granite? If they are granite, why don't they occur in Wicklow? The tops of the hills in Wicklow seem to be round except where the country stone cap still exists.

Thanks in advance, and any pointers to further information on the geology of these ranges would be much appreciated...
mcgowan
2005-07-01 14:56:30
"A chomping good time!!" from mcgowan Contract pics
Picture: A chomping good time!! (Contract pics)

No more mystery - Mystic Ridge, Brandon Mount
In Munsters Mountains, this climb is jazzed up and made to sound like one big crass ramp on the upper section. Well it is grassy but the description in the guide book should by no means put anyone off trying this route, the guide book is afterall one person's opinion of the route.
Back In feb of this year we had a small bit of a cold snap and me and to friends decided to go have a tackle at a couple of ridges on the Dingle pennisula. The day we had for mystic was nice and cold and the rains were gladly ona day off. The first pitch of this savage ridge is a slap in the face, no messing straight into it. Its a reall nice first pitch, the second has a little step on it and after that its all easy scrambling till the start of the second section. If you have every seen mystic ridge there is no mistaking the grassy flat that marks the mid point of the route. Here there is a choice to be made, go up the rock face at about VS or take the gully which on the day we had it was frozen and covered slightly with snow, was at about Grade 3 scottish. Naturally since two of us, me included, were itching to try out new crampons we took the gully. Fine protection on the right hand side to a great bealy at the top of this, which were the pic was taken.
After this it was all bits of crag and lots of grass, even though we had it frozen I have done it again recently not frozen and the crass areas are all manageable. There are a few options on the later part of the second section for some harder options, which we were taking, unfortuneately I had a little slip and ended up bouncing and falling back down 20m of rope. But I managed to lead out the last 3 pitches of the climb with nothing more than a sprained ankle.
All in all however this is one fine ridge well worth having a stab at it. I know that I will be heading back to do it numerous time more!!!
Bleck Cra
2005-06-28 22:50:31
"Eagle in the Mist" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: Eagle in the Mist (Contract pics)

Pique Performance
There are few moments in our brief skite across this slippery world, when the mist clears and a horizon sharp as a razor blade makes us dive for cover. With that kind of intro, we could expect this to be one. He stood mesmerised by the conflicting images at the Bloody Bridge carpark - height, depth, width, length. In a muscle shirt, de trop sun specs, a bag with the whole camel in it and poles with a shine to take your eye out. “Where you heading?” I posed in a kind of a so-what way. “Oh, up Komodo,” he suggested. Other subjects were discussed - beer, women, life. “Oh I work in advertising and what about you (dragon slayer)?”. “I work for the Library Board…, part-time.” (The name’s Bond - James Bond.) Anyway, so he says “I had a friend. We were on Eagle Rock; you know where that is?” I took a good look at him: big muscle shirt, big bloke but no big muscles. Too many curry chips to be anywhere near Eagle Rock, the quickest route out of this world, in the Mournes. “Well it was unbelievable,” he said, “like ice.” “Was it?” said I. “Was it what?” said he. “Ice?” said I. “Yes,” said he. “And my friend …” at this point, he did a downhill ski thing with his hand, and off over some imaginary precipice and then ……. silence. “my friend …he was just …..” and he looked dolefully at his feet, “…. he was gone.” Suddenly, my sarcasm was ashamed and I was gripped by the pathos of the thing. “When was this?” I ventured. “Last week.” “Bloody Hell”, I thought. “And he said he would never came back to hillwalking, ever again.” “Ah,” I said and just went on.
evelyn
2005-06-28 11:08:29
A Swiss Snifter
With the use of trains, cablecars and Postbuses the Swiss Alps are accessable to all from 4 months in a pram, for those who are wheelcahir bound, and indeed I met a gentleman who was 84 years young on these trails! Meiringen is central to hundreds if not thousands of miles of waymarked trails, from steep scree slopes to a gentle contour path, from a cruise on the nearby lakes of Brienzersee and Thun, to a ridge walk at over 2250 metres with not much between you and 550 metres. Through summer snow and glacier walks to knee high meadows covered in gentians and orchids. The call of the Golden Eagle or Kite in the Gental to the swans swimming proudly with their clutch of 7 in Brienz. The complete silence of a highspeed train to the noisy cog and rack trains climbing ascents that trains shouldn't do? The gentle swinging of the cablecar as it brings you ever higher. The trickles from under the ice, the babbling streams and brooks, the roaring rivers churning beneath the bridge with no sides and a few boards, a river of 25metres in width being squeezed through a gap of one metre before continuing its roar at 25 plus metres again. The motor free towns and villages, supplies come in by helicopter, or why not experience the flight of a bird try paragliding? There's so much to do and see it's hard to fit everything in! But I'll be going back to the Hasliberg sometime hopefully soon!
evelyn
2005-06-21 15:46:15
wee wet ulster stone
alas my friend bleck if you were to disappear under that wee wet ulster stone - the Mournes would not be the same without that jovial spirit you have, pretty though the stone may be! This website ensures that everybody can enjoy our mountains, but the books full of photos of mountains that prop up my TV that airs travel and nature programmes, sparked a smouldering desire to explore mountains further afield, a raging inferno ensued lapping against my heart, my love of Djouce and the Brandy Pad ensured I would go one day somewhere different, so I tapped walking holidays in to the search engine and up popped a multitude of choices - yes little me, me of the Dublin suburbs, and Wicklow hills found myself suddenly on a plane to an unknown shore - that was 2002! Alas my boots will have to retire they have a new career of keeping foot in stirrup, but they have explored desert and glacier with me and it's so hard to part with a good pair of slippers! I just wanted to let you all know that the World is out there, and as I stood beneath those incredible famous peaks, I thought to myself I must let those on mountain views know, cuz we don't have this at home! If anybody is thinking about travelling overseas take the pressure off and leave as much as possible to the experts - I can recommend Sherpa and New Experiences - have a look at their websites there might be something there you'd like to try. Next year for me? The Atlas in North Africa!!
evelyn
2005-06-20 08:10:36
Further afield
I'm back to this little aul country of ours - I had a wonderful time - the June bank holiday I was walking in the West Highlands of Scotland and having experienced the delight of the remote Glen Etive, and climbing above Kinlochleven and Glen Coe, I drove back to Dublin, jumped on a plane and flew to Zurich, 3 hours later by train I was standing in the beautiful town Meiringen, home of the Meringue and also the Reichenbach Falls where Sherlock Holmes and Moriarty had their famous fight. The Swiss have it sussed, every junction there is a sign directing you across alpine meadows, passed many cows, through forests, along ridges, across waterfalls, and of course.... across frozen rivers, glaciers the list is endless! So many ambitions have been fulfilled - crossing the Aletsch Glacier at over 3450 m above sea level at -5 deg C, passing below the famous peaks such as the Eiger, Monck, and Jungfrau, walking below the Weterhorn, the Wellhorn, watching an avalanche thunder it's way down the side of the mountains. Wow, wow, wow Bleck my friend my visa was hit but that was only in the gift shops, had I not gone in there the holiday was very reasonable in price - but the experience far out weighed the cost!!
Bleck Cra
2005-06-13 19:48:39
"..... a boulder" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: ..... a boulder (Contract pics)

Leading Man
Two young Dubliners burrowing up Meelbeg en route to Rostrevor from an overnight pitch by the Annalong. He, delighted with the whole thing and she ditto, but a pace behind. “a pace behind ….”? I sense indignation coiling up tight as a cobra in a coffee cup. Simple fact is, other than you girls who are into this lark seriously, there are as many who tag along just to be beside “Handsome”. But what a price! A face so red and blotchy you couldn’t love it if you reared it, rat’s tail hair and breath the taste of railings. Poor goose, but enter stage left, Mr Gander. The Back Castles on Binnian: she small and narrow like a fairy; he large and wide like a ferry. Well-heeled North County Down. He trailing, gasping and torpid with boredom, fiddling with bits, like a child. I want to spare him, by shouting “Come along now Jonny for Heaven’s sake. Hilary hasn’t got all day you know!.” Anyway, Jonny sets into ascending a boulder, perhaps the better to view the pointlessness of it all. But alas, poor put-upon passenger, he has put upon far too much, since he walked Hilary home from the Hop - and he is soon to descend by way of a sliding half split and a tucked plummet, bang on to the centre of his gravity. This girth has been propping up a grand’s worth of Digital SLR, which is now reduced to springs and sprockets. Barely missing a stride, Hilary simply glances back and rolls her eyes…..”tch”. What is this about? If she said “Go home now Dear”, he would kiss her feet and buy her the world. So blokes, why not try that out on herself: “Go home now Dear” and report back.


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Summit Comment
Curra Hill: Cloudy Climb
andreos97 a day ago.
Fantastic walk, personally feel it's best starting your approach from Glenbeigh village and heading up through the forest (663 908) as it's quite well signposted. Once leaving the cover of the tre...

  
Track
Barnavave and Slieve Foye from Carlingford
simon3 a day ago.
This route mostly takes low gradient tracks to ascend to first Barnavave and then Slieve Foye.Ascending Barnavave from... walk, Len: 9.8km, Climb: 684m, Area: Barnavave, Cooley/Gullion (Ireland) Barn

  
Summit Summary
Barnavave: Double humped, easy to visit, good views.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 a day ago.
One way to go up is from Carlingford. Start at around J1839 1095 up a path (not the adjacent track). Following the path makes for an easy ascent. It is also possible to start on the SW side for ex...

Track
Nire Valley 22km loop walk through the Gap and to Crotty's and up to Fauscoum
Ulsterpooka a week ago.
walk, Len: 20.4km, Climb: 1140m, Area: Fauscoum, Comeragh Mountains (Ireland) F...

  
Summit Comment
Knockastia: Hunting and shooting forbidden
ceadeile 5 days ago.
The path described by FergalH is now, January 2018, very overgrown. There are many thorn bushes in particular which make it a somewhat dangerous for your eyes. A simpler approach is to park at the...

  
Forum: General
Carol Morgan wins the women's Spine Race agai
IainT 2 days ago.
Carol Morgan from Dublin has come in as first woman in the Spine Race for the 2nd time after crossing the Cheviots in some of the toughest conditions in the race for years. She is over a day ahead...

Summit Comment
Banagher Hill: Better road surface - easier access now
Pepe 5 days ago.
Followed the Bluestack Way sign mentioned by Aidy. The road is well surfaced now, though narrow. Drove a couple of kilometres NW (ignoring lower-down parking areas) to a small plantation on the le...

  
Forum: General
When hill-walking meets (pre)history
David-Guenot 3 days ago.
Amazing discovery by a hill-walker. It seems the Irish hills still have many a secret to hide... http://www.thejournal.ie/ancient-human-remains-mayo-3805783-Jan2018/?utm_source=shortlinkAnd an art...

  
Track
Drumnalifferney North East Top
Aidy a week ago.
I did this route in winter conditions, and the views to be had around the Derryveagh Mountains, over Dunlewey, and ac... walk, Len: 8.7km, Climb: 577m, Area: Drumnalifferny North-East Top, Donegal NW

Summit Comment
The Ravens Rock: Crispy Morning Rock Hopping
Pepe 5 days ago.
Climbed this via the ascent up the Fox's Rock from the Long Woman's Grave. Took the direct route up (steep and slippy!) on a crunchy January morning. The light and the views were magnificent. If y...

  
Track
January Club Walk - Na Sleibhte Hillwalking Club - Route 1 (of 5 options)
GSheehy a week ago.
" 'Twas like doing the Turks challenge after the Christmas dinner." walk, Len: 31.0km, Climb: 1800m, Area: Fauscoum, Comeragh Mountains (Ireland) F...

  
Summit Comment
Slieve Bawn: Now home to a Windfarm and Recreation Area
melohara a week ago.
Slieve Bawn is now home to the Sliabh Bawn Windfarm and Recreation Area, a joint development between Coillte and Bord na Móna. Car parks have been provided and a number of walking trails developed...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 17 Next page >>