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Post details Post   (Contract pics)
sorbus
2005-05-03 21:52:15
NAVAAAAAN HILLWALKERS
I don't know what others members think ,but I'm beginning to find Navan Hillwalkers tiresome and in particular their so called leader Captain Horizontal.I suggest that they be banned from the site or at least be limited to one comment between them all per month.
CaptainVertigo
2005-04-29 17:50:03
The Seven Sevens
***NA SEACHT SEACHTANNA***NEWSFLASH****I have discovered an Organisation called "The Northern Ireland Mountain Running Association" They RACE the 7x7s...while the rest of us walk. Walkers get to go any route they wish. In theory this means that one could begin with Donard, then waltz over to Meelbeg, then back to Commedagh and so on. But the Mountain Runs Folk follow a FIXED route as their publicity reveals. I quote:"The Mourne Seven Sevens will start from Donard car park on Saturday the 7th August at 10.00 am. [for runners...walkers start from 7am] The route will be on a fixed course taking the hills concerned in the following order…. Donard, Commedagh, Bearnagh, Meelmore, Meelbeg, Ben Crom Dam, Binnian, Lamagan, and back to the finish at the Pavilion in Donard Park." I find this very helpful as a potential walker of the 7.7s. I suspect that, since the RUNNERS take a fixed route, you can say ipso facto that theirs is the shortest. {Editor's Note: "Captain, the kind of folk who like to race up and down mountains may have other motivations than the avoidance of suffering..."} Yes thank you Editor, I realise that. but I still strongly suspect that the RUNNERS ROUTE is the best route, and the one we should all take. """"""""""I would love to hear comments from any of you who have already "done" the Seven Sevens: what route you took, weather, navigation, duration, age range of participants. Do tell all please.
simon3
2005-04-28 13:16:10
Peak Bagging
Yeah, you sometimes get that thing about ticking off lists, usually with comparisons with trainspotting or stamp-collecting. But summitting brings me to so many interesting places away from the honey-pots and brings benefits in widening appreciation of the hills. If you are into hillwalking what set of activities and goals has anyone got and did they ever make sense?

Speaking of goals you can reduce any sport if you ignore what it means to people. Isn't soccer an activity where a group of eleven grown men attempt to propel a bladder full of compressed air between a wooden frame at one end of a field using their feet and heads opposed by another eleven?
CaptainVertigo
2005-04-27 23:46:33
"The Captain mounts Knockpasheemore" from CaptainVertigo Contract pics
Picture: The Captain mounts Knockpasheemore (Contract pics)

Peak Bagging
I enjoyed the following description of PEAK BAGGING......................................."Peak Bagging is an activity undertaken by grown men and women and involves Walking and Hiking up all the hills and mountains on a particular list - so that you can proudly claim to have er . . walked or hiked up all the hills and mountains on a particular list. As pastimes go it's pretty harmless, healthy and gets you out into the countryside - which all in all can't be a bad thing."
Bleck Cra
2005-04-25 19:43:18
"Here you can look down on the rock climbers. Any ideas?" from Bleck Cra Contract pics
Picture: Here you can look down on the rock climbers. Any ideas? (Contract pics)

Where Egos Dare
Can’t do it - don’t know how to do it: tell a fellow hillwalker how not to get killed. Saturday, three blokes were coming off Bearnagh on the North side of the wall at Hares Gap - 40/50s fit, kitted out, no fools, but a bit baffled. I caught the eye of one of them over the wall. “Watch yourself,” I said. “Why?” he said. “Because you’ll get killed,” I said. “Why?” he said ….. and I knew were getting into a stand-off. “I’m just saying…” I said - and you know when you get to “I’m just saying”, whatever control you may have had on the situation, has just evaporated. “You’ll only get off there, with ropes,” I said, sounding like a complete nkr. “Why?”, he said. “Look”, I said “there are crags” and stomped off. The problem kind of is, that most people, with notable exceptions, on the hills are mature, wise and knowledgeable, but contrarily, not enough to welcome advice readily. I am myself that soldier. We are a cross section of society, a bit skewed, yet do have our fair share of know-its-all - and what we all don’t want to be is one of them. I can hear braying of “just tell them and stop being such a wuss,” but my last point remains. Well anyway, rather than let them pogo into infinity, I waited at the bottom of the crags squinting into the sun, to scold them were they not to be advised. They were advised and cut back across the wall. Yes the sun - it is official: Spring has sprung in the black North, circa cheese sandwich time Saturday 23rd inst and celebrated in time-honoured fashion by Billy kicking the F out of Dan and Dan kicking the F out of Billy.
johnvbrennan
2005-04-25 09:49:42
Looking for something to do this Bank Holiday
Fellow Walkers,
Ballyhoura Walking Club are hosting their 10th International Walking festival from Saturday April 30 to Monday May 2nd.

Saturday: A + B walks. The A walk is our 26 mile marathon challenge. This is a challenging well marked circuit (New route this year) including steep short climbs, forest trails, farmland and magnificent views.

Sunday: A + B walks in the Galty's. The 'A' walk is a challenging mountain trek visiting 5 peaks and 5 lakes

For further information see our website http://www.ballyhourabears.com. You may also contact Ballyhoura Failte Monday to Friday on 063 91300 or email: info@ballyhoura.org.
Bleck Cra
2005-04-22 00:32:00
Hello andagda. Like everywhere else, Mourne country is bursting with the very best in everything (if only you were on the spot and knew where). Allow me. Number 1, Newcastle County Down is a large, very pretty seaside town with Messr French’s added interest of the hills actually sweeping down to the sea - see it and believe it. Any quantity of accommodation and a couple of excellent restaurants - including Sea Salt on the main street.
Keep away from the big old venues - uninspired. Jumping pubs. Leave out mid season: too frantic. Dundrum a few miles up the Road - 2 stunning restaurants: Bucks Head and a new one - dunno the name; pubs only so-so I think. Castlewellan - wild as crows and really fantastic pub scene: they have a feis called “Celtic Fusion” on the net - if you can come then, absolutely do. I personally love the Maghera Arms behind Dundrum - big session nights and simple home made grub - completely fantastic after a day on the hills - and the stout starts getting poured from dawn, so when you get to it, it’s straight from heaven. Plenty other excellent pubs and restaurants and accomm all around, but that’s your starter for 10. If you want any more info, get my email from Simon, the boss of this site.
andagda
2005-04-21 13:20:30
Mourne Bases
I'm organising a weekend walking in the Mournes for myself and a few friends. Can anyone suggest a good base village/town? We'd ideally like somewhere that is accessible to the hills but also has a good pub/restaurant scene. Carlingford springs to mind, but only because I've stayed there before. My knowledge of similar towns in the area is non-existant, and I would appreciate suggestions...

Thanks.
CaptainVertigo
2005-04-21 10:38:39
Weather Problems
Greetings Bleck and Simon. I spent the whole of last week looking forward to the Navan Hillwalker's climb on Binnian but when we assembled on Sunday morning it was clear that we would face a continuous downpour. By then the weather folk were talking about an intense Low hovering over the island for the day, possible flash floods, high winds, and the like. We merged the die hards of our "moderate" and "easy" groups, abandoned the lovely Binnian, and headed for Wicklow to circumnavigate Lough Dan. It never let up for the five hours and the dozen or so that went were soaked through. Some of our guys had top gear on but they still got soaked (sweat may have been a factor there). There is an ABSOLUTE RULE in these situations. If you get wet KEEP MOVING. If you stop at all your temperature will drop and your body will seize up. Personally I enjoyed the day very much. Suffering brings peculiar pleasures.:the knowledge that it will end, that it will be fondly remembered in the future: the bonding that takes place in a group as the depths are plumbed. I felt that the suffering would have been even greater in the Mournes, and that, to that extent, an opportunity had been missed. Many of our friends and families undoubtedly spent Sunday lounging about in front of the television and the like. How sad for them. They could have ventured forth into the wilderness and experienced what all of human history has been about. They could have lived briefly.
P.S. I laugh to think how careful we were when crossing a raging stream (from rock to rock) early on in the day. We should have just waded across and accepted our wetting straight away, instead of letting it happen slowly! How hope triumphs over experience!
simon3
2005-04-20 13:07:20
Whether Forecast
oh I loved that one Bleck!
my principle in walking in Wicklow has always been to disregard the weatherman and wait to see what I encounter

a. if you believe a bad weather forecast that turns out to be incorrect, you have missed a walk

b. when predicted, bad weather usually appears in showers which are easily dealt with

c. if you encounter continuous rain this is usually apparent before you start and you can do something different

d. if it really is unpleasant you can change your route and go home, often in Wicklow by setting your compass or GPS to the starting point

On average I would say the weather seriously stops me only about 2 weeks a year.

However this simple principle don't necessarily work elsewhere. I will never forget walking for 10 hours in the rain on the 'Turks in 1995. 450 people started (far too many) and only about 80 finished as far as I remember. I had become so cold that about two hours after finishing the walk I started to get spasms. You know stitches in your side or in your legs? Well this was in each and every limb. My entire body became rigid. For many of the wilder places, unlike most of Wicklow, it is quite difficult to leave an area, particularly if your transport is to the north or east of the range. Wicklow's mountains may have been 2500m high once but nowadays the flattened stumps left after 350m years of erosion don't offer as many serious cliffs as elsewhere..

It may have been snowing in the north but in Wicklow it was a continuous downpour. I see from john_desmond's comments however that the Comeraghs were actually clear!


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 19 Next page >>
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Forum: General
"Deaded"
BleckCra a week ago.
Never would have thought it but it turns out mountains can can be named after insects. Despite all my decrying this site for its translation of Meelmore as Hill of the Ants, I find right on the do...

  
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Croagh Patrick
Paul_Rooney 3 days ago.
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Summit Comment
Binn Mhairg: A well worthwhile but neglected scramble
IainT a week ago.
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Summit Comment
Aughinish: Clare Island
sandman a week ago.
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Near Truskmore, Dartry Mountains (Ireland)
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Local 100
wwwalker 4 weeks ago.
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Summit Comment
Munnia Top: Coastal Hill
sandman a week ago.
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RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 19 Next page >>