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The Bibliography. Information for books on Irish mountains and hillwalking.
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Airey, Alan Irish Hill Days 1937 >>
Andrews, J. H. Paper Landscape, A 1975 >>
Bardwell, Sandra, Helen Fairbairn & Gareth McCorma Walking in Ireland 1999 >>
Barry Dalby The Wicklow Way (Map Guide) 1993 >>
Booth, Frank The Independent Walker's Guide to Ireland 1999 >>
Boydell, Herman & McCarthy Walk Guide: East of Ireland 1991 >>
Boyle, Ken & Orla Bourke Wicklow Way, The 1990 >>
Butterfield, Irvine High Mountains of Britain and Ireland, The 1986 >>
Clements, E. D. The Hewitts and Marilyns of Ireland 1997 >>
Clements, Paul Height of Nonsense, The 2005 >>
Coleman, J. C. Mountains of Killarney, The 1948 >>
Corcoran, Kevin Kerry Walks 1992 >>
Corcoran, Kevin West Cork Walks 1991 >>
Corcoran, Kevin West of Ireland Walks 1997 >>
Dalby, Barry The Wicklow Way Map Guide 1993 >>
Davey, Bernard Bernard Davey's Mourne 1999 >>
Davey, Bernard BERNARD DAVEY'S MOURNES 1999 >>
de Courcy, John W. "Mountains and Summits shown on maps before AD 1700" (articl 2005 >>
Dillon, Paddy Mountains of Ireland, The 1992 >>
Dillon, Paddy Complete Ulster Way Walks, The 1999 >>
Dillon, Paddy Ulster Way, The 199? >>
Dillon, Paddy Exploring the South of Ireland 1998 >>
Dillon, Paddy Connemara 2001 >>
EastWest Mapping Wicklow Way Walks 1998 >>
Fairbairn, Helen Northern Ireland: A Walking Guide 2006 >>
Fairbairn, Helen Ireland's Best Walks - A Walking Guide 2014 >>
Fairbairn, Helen Ireland's Adventure Bucket List, Great Outdoor Experiences 2018 >>
Fewer, Michael Wicklow Way, The 1998 >>
Flanagan, David & Creagh, Richard Exploring Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way 2016 >>
Flowerdew, Michael, P.J. McKeever & J.D. Smyth Explore Series Unkn >>
 
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Flanagan, David & Creagh, Richard Exploring Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way
 
Publisher: Three Rock Books Published: 2016 Last revision: Added by aidand
This book is a travel guide to the west coast of Ireland. It has 224 pages and numerous photographs and outline maps.
aidand
2018-01-17 15:43
This book is definitely a keeper, a book Iíll hang on to knowing Iíll return to it again and again. I donít know who the genius is who came up with the concept of the Wild Atlantic Way (WAW) but they are a national treasure. You might regard the WAW as a marketing gimmick but so what life. The concept, basically a load of road signs, has brought huge business into some of the remotest communities in the country along the 2,500 km western seaboard from Cork to Donegal. This is a very fine guidebook. There is a huge amount of information packed into the books 224 pages. Clearly a vast amount of research went into the book. Most importantly the book is very readable. It is divided into chapters following the WAW from Kinsale up to Lough Foyle. There is lots of detail in the book about things to do - beaches, kayaking, looped walks, cycle routes, camping, horse riding etc. The book is very much aimed at the more active holiday maker. If you are looking for luxury hotels and fine dining then this might not be the book for you. The WAW isnít Route 66 and itís not about rushing from one end to the other. The book sensibly advises concentrating on one area and lingering there awhile. The book doesnít list everything you might see or do on the WAW, clearly that would take many volumes, but itís hard to fault the selection in the book. Itís not an accommodation guide though it mentions a lot of campsites and hostels. The book is beautifully produced with a large number of fine photographs and useful outline maps. Well worth a look.    

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 .. 16 Next page >>
Track
Cullentragh and Derrybawn
simon3 14 hours ago.
This route takes a somewhat different route to find it's way to the Derrybawn ridge. walk, Len: 16.4km, Climb: 670m, Area: Cullentragh Mountain, Wicklow (Ireland) C...

  
Summit Comment
Errigal: Reflection
mcrtchly 5 days ago.
Errigal rises majestically above the uncharacteristically calm Dunlewey Lough beckoning us to climb its snow covered summit the next day

  
Summit Comment
Slieve Rushen: Snowed under
Colin Murphy 5 days ago.
It's amazing sometimes how winter can transform an otherwise ordinary little hill into something beautiful. Slieve Rushen is a tramp through heather to a broad mound with a slightly smaller m...

Summit Summary
Slieve Rushen: Heather-topped hill with good views
Collaborative entry Last edit by: Colin Murphy 5 days ago.
It is possible to drive up a narrow forest road to H23164 21626, (Corneen Wind Farm) where there is parking for a few cars. This will take you to about 350m ascent, however after that, depend...

  
Track
If you like your Binnions served wet
eamonoc 15 hours ago.
Started this walk from Carpark at Glengesh Gap, from the start the ground was very wet and boggy and continued so ov... walk, Len: 9.0km, Climb: 463m, Area: Cruach an Bheithe, Donegal SW (Ireland) ||

  
Summit Comment
Annagh Island: Narrow but tricky channel to cross
Fergalh a week ago.
We approached this island at low tide on a windy day hoping that the channel was narrow enough to cross. However it is around 2/3 metres across with the Atlantic swell rushing through and wit...

Summit Comment
Fossy Mountain: Access update point B
moggy40 3 days ago.
The gate at point B now has a lock on it, so driving is out. Bike or walk is still an option

  
Summit Summary
Croughaun Hill: Well worth a visit
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 a week ago.
Start at the forest entrance S36451 10191 where the is room to park 3-4 cars.Follow the forest track uphill.After coming to a gate next to a sheep fold at S37063 11231 do not go through the g...

  
Summit Summary
Slieve Commedagh: High, flat- topped coastal peak wirh steep approaches.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: markmjcampion a week ago.
Commedagh is the 2nd highest Mourne, a col separating it from Donard to the SE. It lies near Newcastle on the E edge of the range and has a broad, grassy top surrounded by steep, heathery app...

Summit Comment
Stob a'Ghlais Choire: Viewed from Stob na Brůige
billbaggins a week ago.
Stob a'Ghlais Choire from Stob na Brůige.Schiehallion on the horizon with Creise, Beinn Mhic Chasgaig and Clach Leathad also in the frame

  
Track
Fine route in the Centre of Fanad Peninsula
eamonoc 15 hours ago.
walk, Len: 8.3km, Climb: 461m, Area: Cnoc Colbha, Donegal North (Ireland) Cnoc ...

  
Summit Comment
Creag Dhubh: Stob Dearg viewed descending Creag Dubh
billbaggins a week ago.
Stob Dearg viewed descending Creag Dubh


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 .. 16 Next page >>