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Dingle West Area
Maximum height for area: 516 metres,   Summits in area: 14,   Maximum prominence for area: 461 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 70 For all tops   Highest summit: Mount Eagle, 516m
Rating graphic.
Croaghmore Hill An Cró Mór A name in Irish
(Ir. An Cró Mór [OSI], 'the big sheep-pen') Kerry County, in Binnion List, Cross-bedded sandstone Bedrock

Height: 292m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 70 Grid Reference: V24619 95806 This summit has been logged as climbed by 46 members. Recently by: Wildcat, Cobhclimber, Wilderness, MichaelE, trekker, ahendroff, DenisMc, chalky, jlk, Moneenman, Philewis, Cormacg, Aongus, Ray-Lexi, Colin Murphy
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -10.559429, Latitude: 52.086867 , Easting: 24619, Northing: 95806 Prominence: 292m,   Isolation: 4.3km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 424609 595863,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Crg293, 10 char: Croaghmore
Bedrock type: Cross-bedded sandstone, (Coumeenoole Sandstone Formation)

This name has been misleadingly anglicised as if it contained the element cruach, 'stack'. It actually contains cró, 'sheep-pen', and it seems that the name has been transferred from a pen to the hill on which it was situated.   An Cró Mór is the 1168th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/963/
COMMENTS for An Cró Mór 1 of 1
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Cró Mór in area Dingle West, Ireland
Picture: looking back to Dingle penninsula
gerrym on An Cró Mór, 2009
by gerrym  14 Jul 2009
An Cro Mor weighs in at less than 300m, but this belies it's true stature. The story begins in the village of Dunquin with the Blasket Island visitor centre telling the story of the island. This is a great audio and visual experience that brings the island to life - with a great poetic and literary tradition against the backdrop of fishing and farming and a dwindling populace, until all left in the 1950's.
Dunquin is also the shortest crossing to Great Blasket. Eco-tours around the other islands are also available and would make for an interesting few hours. The tiny harbour is reached by a steep concrete path and a careful step onto the small boat for the 20 minute crossing (25 euro). Even on a calm day there was a 5-6 foot swell which called for a tight hold on the handrails. A transfer to a small dingy and the donning of a lifejacket brings the slipway at the island and firm ground once more.

The remains of a once vibrant community are laid out in the stone houses in various states of decay, above a lovely beach and views across to the mainland - to Mt Eagle and further to Brandon. I saw my 1st chough here, with its distictive red beak. A green track zig zags uphill and starts the walk high up along the S side of the island - views increase to the sharp Skelligs and the mountainous protrusions of Iveragh and Beara. There are plunging drops to the sea, a ring of white encircling the island as water pushes against immovable rock. Clouds were piling up over the hills of Dingle and disappearing as they travelled over the sea, leaving the island bathed in strong June sunshine. As we stopped for lunch boats hugged the hem line of the island below with thier tours and i thought the price for my journey was pretty small.

The track joins that which takes the northern side of the island before rising to the top of An Mullach Ramher (281m). Inis Tuaisceart to the N and Inis na Bro and Inis Mhic Aoibhleain to the SW join the picture as smaller siblings. There is a short drop and ascent to the trig pillar at An Cro Mor, through red heather and stunning views in all directions.

The top read 967ft on my GPS, after walking 3m in 1.25 hours. The top was misty as air rose strongly from the N against the very steep hillside. This gave only glimpses of the magnificent views along the whole island - to the other Blasket Islands, including the pointed sahape of An Tiaracht - to the hills of Dingle, Iveragh and Beara and the smaller sharper Skellig islands to the S. Returned on N side of the island - this gave a much better perspective on the hills rising up from the sea.

There was time to spend on the warm sand of the beach - watching boats ply thier trade, a yacht drop anchor, a seal raise its head and feel the cool waters before the last boat returned to the mainland. A walk of 6m and 2.25 hours. Very few people exploring the length of the island - good for us but a pity as they were missing out - will you?? Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/963/comment/3926/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Cró Mór in area Dingle West, Ireland
Picture: Some of the other visitors to the Island
Where Is Tony Soper when you need him?
by three5four0  31 Aug 2011
On our recent trip to Great Blasket Island we arranged a private hire, to ensure an early arrival on the island. As our boat approached the Island we noticed seabirds, in great numbers, diving into the sea, a shoal of fish no doubt. As my friends watched this I just happened to look over board, only to see the largest Basking Shark I have ever seen, quietly gild by our boat. Well, it was actually longer than our boat! I lent over to touch its dorsal fin only to jump back as my friend to my left shouted ' look at that!' The sea birds had been joined by a pod of dolphins, which were jumping right out of the water and generally feasting on the unlucky shoal . If the fish were not already taking an enough of a pasting, we watched on as, what we were told were, minkie whales arriving to finish off the hapless fish.

Now that is not an everyday scene, at least not one you are going to run into driving to work of a morning. As we pondered this and the fact no one managed to get any shots we arrived in the bay, where we were to transfer to a smaller boat so we could land at the slipway.

It wasn't the fact the beach appeared to be covered in seals, that held our eyes, but it was the shear amount of Basking sharks there was in this bay. So many in fact, that negotiating our small landing rib round them took some effort. I stopped counting at 25, and that was just the ones nearest to us. And I can confirm, when your in a small landing rib, with a shark thats more than twice the length of your boat swimming beside you. it is hard not to think of the film Jaws, and to remember these type of sharks only eat - or should that be filter? - plankton! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/963/comment/6503/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Cró Mór in area Dingle West, Ireland
Picture: An Cró Mór and An Tiaracht (island)
Lorcan-o-c on An Cró Mór, 2009
by Lorcan-o-c  12 Jan 2009
An Cró Mór is the highest point on the Great Blasket Island. This island can be reached by ferry (when running) from the pier at Dún Chaoin and may also be approached by boat from Dingle. An Cró Mór is obtained from the slipway on the island by heading up and northward through the ruined village, passing above the three white-washed houses which are visible even from the mainland. The path levels off and swings west, eventually coming to a "Tee-junction"; go right at the “Tee-junction” and up past An Dún (the fort or rath). Continuing along the narrow path above the cliffs brings you to a rise from which you can see An Cró Mór. The path then drops down to a saddle from which An Cró is reached after a number of small stages. It is marked by a rough-concrete obelisk and on a good day offers excellent views of four of the Blasket Islands. From slipway to An Cró is approximately 1.5hours. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/963/comment/3523/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Cró Mór in area Dingle West, Ireland
Picture: Track out to Slievedonagh
Shark free photo
by three5four0  31 Aug 2011
Heres a photo of the track out to Slievedonagh, where you follow its ridge out to An Cro Mors summit. I think that would be Tearaght Island on the right. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/963/comment/6504/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Cró Mór in area Dingle West, Ireland
Picture: Croaghmore from the SW
High point on a dramatic island.
by simon3  11 Sep 2012
Inishnabro provides a place to view much of the end of the Dingle Peninsula. Central in this view is the Great Blasket with Croaghmore its highest point. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/963/comment/14807/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Cró Mór in area Dingle West, Ireland
Picture: The Green Road looking north west
The Green Road
by march-fixer  16 Sep 2012
What an idyllic spot ... especially so when the weather is pleasant!

Looking north west down the Green Road, from just above the pier, to the handful of habitable of dwellings that look out over the pristine beach. Local lore has it that Peig Sayers lived in one of these houses, as opposed to the smaller ruins to the right. It looks most likely they have been improved and expanded somewhat since her day!

The lazy potato beds can just be seen on the slope beyond the houses and the island of Inishtooskert can be seen at the top left of the photo.

This Green Road leads down the south side of the island and then crosses over between An Cró Mór and Slievedonagh to return via the northern side. The track is mostly good with the odd soggy bits.
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(End of comment section for An Cró Mór.)

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