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Route to Claggan NE Top

Slievemore Circuit

Farbreague: from Arderin

Tonelagee: Fore!!!

Brandon Hill: Grand on Brandon!

Robber's Pass Hill: Minor heathery lump. Overcivilised and underwhelming.

Croaghmoyle: Easy walk up to great views

Ben of Howth: Loop walk starting from Howth Harbour

Carrigroe: Sea of cloud

Slieve Binnian - more track work ?

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Dublin/Wicklow Area   Wicklow Mountains Subarea
Maximum height for area: 925 metres,   Summits in area: 128,   Maximum prominence for area: 905 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 28B, 49, 50, 55, 56, 61, 62, AWW For all tops   Highest summit: Lugnaquilla, 925m

Summits in area Dublin/Wicklow:
Ballinacorbeg 336mBallinastraw 284mBallycurry 301mBallyguile Hill 188mBallyhook Hill 288mBray Head Hill 240mCarrickgollogan 276mCarrigeen Hill 298mCarrigoona Commons East 242mCloghnagaune 385mCorballis Hill 258mCupidstown Hill 378.6mDunranhill 342mEagle Hill 296mKilleagh 249mKilliney Hill 153.5mKilmichael Hill 267mKilnamanagh Hill 217mKnockannavea 400.8mKnockree 342mMount Kennedy 365.9mSlieveroe 332mWestaston Hill 270m
Dublin Mountains:   Corrig Mountain 617.1mGlendoo Mountain 586mKippure 757mKnocknagun 555mPrince William's Seat 555mSaggart Hill 396.9mSeahan 647.3mSeefin 620.6mSeefingan 722.9mTibradden Mountain 467mTwo Rock Mountain 536m
Wicklow Mountains:   Annagh Hill 454mBallinacor Mountain 531mBallinafunshoge 480mBallineddan Mountain 652mBallycumber Hill 431mBallycurragh Hill 536mBallyteige 447mBaltinglass Hill 382mBarranisky 280mBenleagh 689mBlack Hill 602.2mBrockagh Mountain 557mBrockagh Mountain North-West Top 548mBrockagh Mountain SE Top 470mCamaderry Mountain 698.6mCamaderry South East Top 677.3mCamenabologue 758mCamenabologue SE Top 663mCarrick Mountain 381mCarrickashane Mountain 508mCarrig Mountain 571mCarrigleitrim 408mCarriglineen Mountain 455mCarrignagunneen 561mCarrigshouk 572.5mCarrigvore 682mChurch Mountain 544mCloghernagh 800mCollon Hill 238mConavalla 734mCorriebracks 531mCorrigasleggaun 794mCroaghanmoira 664mCroaghanmoira North Top 575mCroghan Kinsella 606mCroghan Kinsella East Top 561mCullentragh Mountain 510mCushbawn 400mDerrybawn Mountain 474mDjouce 725mDuff Hill 720mFair Mountain 571.2mFananierin 426mGravale 718mGreat Sugar Loaf 501mKanturk 523mKeadeen Mountain 653mKirikee Mountain 474mKnocknacloghoge 534mLakeen 357mLittle Sugar Loaf 342mLobawn 636mLugduff 652mLugduff SE Top 637mLuggala 595mLugnagun 446.2mLugnaquilla 925mMaulin 570mMoanbane 703mMoneyteige North 427mMullacor 657mMullaghcleevaun 849mMullaghcleevaun East Top 790mMuskeagh Hill 397mPreban Hill 389mRobber's Pass Hill 508.9mScarr 641mScarr North-West Top 561mSeskin 344mSilsean 698mSleamaine 430mSlieve Maan 547.8mSlieve Maan North Top 550mSlievecorragh 418mSlievefoore 414mSlievemaan 759mSorrel Hill 599.5mSpinans Hill 409mSpinans Hill SE Top 400mStoney Top 714mStookeen 420mSugarloaf 552mTable Mountain 701.7mTable Mountain West Top 563mTinoran Hill 312mTomaneena 682.4mTonduff 642mTonduff East Top 593mTonelagee 817mTonelagee NE Top 668mTonlagee South-East Top 546mTrooperstown Hill 430mWar Hill 686mWhite Hill 630.9m
Rating graphic.
Carrick Mountain Hill Wicklow County, in Binnion List, Greywacke & quartzite Bedrock

Height: 381m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 56 Grid Reference: T23262 94066 This summit has been logged as climbed by 72 members. Recently by: hannukkah, supersullivan, fitzsimj, crankechick, marcw, smccarthy, murpha26, fpreid, paddyhillsbagger, GerLeahy, Ben-Ban, eamonoc, wwwalker, madeleineblue, Fergalh
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.165473, Latitude: 52.983478 , Easting: 323262, Northing: 194066 Prominence: 174m,   Isolation: 3.4km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 723184 694101,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Crc381, 10 char: CrckMnt381
Bedrock type: Greywacke & quartzite, (Bray Head Formation)

The name of this hill is documented in various forms, such as Carrigmurrely in 1756 and Carrickmacreily in 1795. It is fairly certain that the second element is a personal name, but the forms are too diverse to specify which name. Price mentions the possibility that it is Ó Murghaile.   Carrick Mountain is the 991st highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/
COMMENTS for Carrick Mountain 1 of 1
Choose your route well for a forested summit.
Short Summary created by simon3, kernowclimber, mcrtchly,  16 Sep 2012
Seen from the N11, Carrick Mountain looks a deceptively easy climb. There is no totally easy route because there are no forest roads leading to the summit. Read the suggestions here or you may find that you are deep in unpleasant forestry.

Possibly the quickest approach is from a forest entrance at T21899 93543 A as shown in Track 2078. Go initially south and then NE towards the summit.

Another approach is to take the forest track from Glenealy to the south. The entrance (T239927 B) is reached by taking the R752 from Rathnew and turning right in Glenealy village, crossing the river and then turning left past the church. Space for one car can be found at T241925 C beneath some trees. Walk westwards to the forest entrance and turn right along a forest road which passes through a mixed plantation and which soon switches back southwards at the first hairpin bend. 250m after the hairpin another road is met; turn right and follow this for 90m until a track (T239931 D) can be taken on the left. Follow this uphill until a 6 way junction is encountered. At the junction continue uphill in same direction as before until the route turns right and contours the hill in a northwards direction. Follow this track to a clear fell area of forest and a turn out. Turn left here up the hillside again until the track turns sharp right. At this point turn left and head for the edge of the forest, keeping a rock outcrop on your right. Pass through the forest to a more open area of wind felled trees which soon leads over a couple of rocky outcrops to the summit. The ascent takes about 60-70 minutes. Return takes about 50mins. This route avoids the crawls and nasty vegetation of other routes.

A third route starts at T24572 96006 E to the NE and is shown in Track 1291.

The summit has a trig pillar sitting on a knob of quartzite which is not forested. The bare rock is extremely slippery when wet. Views are not extensive. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/comment/5624/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carrick Mountain in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: The summit of Carrick is surrounded by dense forest
 
Like Machu Picchu
by wicklore  22 Jul 2014
Map & compass were heavily in use when I climbed Carrick Mountain today. Those who programme summit coordinates into GPS units and let it guide them would have completed this hike in half the time. As it was I spent a long time searching extremely difficult forestry for the elusive summit, which was hindered by the fact that Carrick Mountain actually has several rocky outcrops along the summit.
I started at the Coillte forestry entrance at T246 960 F. A local man gave me directions which proved invaluable as I negotiated the forest tracks and junctions.
From the forest entrance I took the following route: Walk uphill for a few minutes until you arrive at a junction. Go left. A few minutes more brings you to another junction-turn right. After a hundred metres or so the track branches again. Turn left. The track now meanders uphill and after a few hundred metres look out for an obvious muddy path leading into the trees on the right. Follow this path and it will lead you uphill towards the northernmost rocky outcrop on Carrick. The path is churned up in places and evidence of scrambler activity is everywhere. The path eventually rejoins a forestry track that skirts the southern slopes of Carrick.
The summit here was treeless and when I looked up I could see a few rocky outcrops. I spent a long time reaching the top of the highest. This was hampered by chest high ferns and many boulders hidden underfoot. When I climbed to the top of the rock I spied a higher summit sticking out of the trees a few hundred metres further to the south. Trying to reach this second summit involved heading into almost impenetrable forest- the kind that literally had me crawling. I gave up after 15 minutes and had to use my compass to navigate back out.
I made my way downhill to the forest track and followed it into the forest. After a few minutes I then repeatedly battled my way into the trees in vain attempts to locate and reach the summit. Several times I had to navigate back out with compass. This forest was claustrophobic, dark and it was easy to become disorientated. I found a few rocky outcrops but none had the trig point marked on the map. This had become a bizarre experience and I decided to see it to through to the end. Eventually I crawled out of the trees and saw the beautiful trig point sitting on its rock. I felt like Hiram Bingham discovering Machu Picchu!
The views were great although there was cloud on most of the distant mountains. I could identify, amongst others, Croghan Moira, Trooperstown, Derrybawn, Turlough Hill (that flat top is an excellent aid to identification), Tonelagee, Djouce and the Great Sugar Loaf to the north. In fact the whole spectrum of the Wicklow Mountains was on view, hampered only by cloud cover on the higher summits. The coast was visible for dozens of miles along its length. This truly was a hard won and memorable summit. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/comment/3295/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carrick Mountain in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Wicklow's Inaccessible Pinnacle?
madfrankie on Carrick Mountain, 2010
by madfrankie  25 Mar 2010
Before climbing forestry-covered hills I usually take the precaution of printing out satellite images from Google Maps, which give reliable indications of where forest tracks actually are (as opposed to where the OS fondly imagine them to be). Unfortunately, I didn't do that for Carrick Mountain.
Starting from T216940 G I quickly made a few wrong turns followed by a futile 20 minutes of tree-bashing. An hour and a half later, sweating and covered in scratches, I clambered over felled trees and briars up to the summit trig. The summit is the centre one of three rocky tops separated by thick forestry (and vividly described here by Wicklore).
Good views provided some compensation for the effort involved. It's a pity I didn't take note of csd's route, which seems to be relatively hassle-free. A sweaty 3 hours. And bring your machete. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/comment/4533/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carrick Mountain in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: The real summit of Carrick is beyond buried in the trees
 
wicklore on Carrick Mountain, 2008
by wicklore  9 Sep 2008
This is the original summit I climbed on Carrick. Barely visible peeping over the trees ahead is the real summit with the trig pillar. To reach the trig pillar summit as I did from the southern side requires good navigation. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/comment/3297/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carrick Mountain in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: The view NE to the Irish Sea, from the summit
csd on Carrick Mountain, 2008
by csd  31 Dec 2008
I started at the same point as wicklore, and used Sheet 56 to follow the zig-zags of the forest tracks up to the track that finishes just SE of the summit. I continued on a little further than wicklore did, turning right off the main track where in plunges into the forest. I followed this (also scrambler-eroded) track until it met the outcrop wicklore speaks of, where I turned left, keeping the steeper ground on my right. It gets a little tricky towards the real summit, but otherwise straightforward nav. Excellent views from the summit, especially today, with the summit of Lugnaquilla ringed in snow. Makes a nice quiet afternoon's walk for those days when you want something short, but can't face Maulin yet again! Up and down in 2h30 is eminently possible if you don't hang around and take some short cuts off some of the zig-zags on the way down. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/comment/3495/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carrick Mountain in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Local 100 complete
 
So good I climbed it twice
by eamonoc  8 Nov 2013
After climbing Collon earlier on in the day I completed my local 100 with an ascent of Carrick Mountain, I started at Coillte entrance as mentioned by wicklore T246960 (Point F). I followed the muddy path uphill, narrow at first with pleny of evidence of horse riding (hoof prints everywhere), this path zig zagged uphill and using OS sheet 56 I evetually reached the 6 way junction as mentioned by simon3. At this junction I could see the southern most rocky outcrop uphill and there was a clear path here leading up to it, from the junction I headed steeply up towards the rocky outcrop, this took about 5mins, upon reaching this point I looked up to my right and saw another rocky outcrop with a stone cairn, there was a clear path up to it. Here at the cairn I was starting to congratulate myself on completing my local 100 when I spied another higher rocky top about 100mts to the north, there was no path towards it. I made my way down into the surrounding dense forest heading in the general direction of the actual summit, eventually about 8mins later I made it to the summit trig point. Fabulous views in all directions from here. I clapped myself on the back and headed in the general direction I had come from, again heading into dense forest, imagine my surprise when about 5mins later I emerged from the forest and onto the summit of Carrick for a second time. I have to admit I had no compass with me! but after a few sweaty moments ploughing through dense forest once again I eventually made my way back to the outcrop with the stone cairn. I followed my upward route back out to the forest entrance without any difficulties. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/865/comment/15253/
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(End of comment section for Carrick Mountain.)

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