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Binevenagh 385m,
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Keenaght Area
Maximum height for area: 399 metres,   Summits in area: 5,   Maximum prominence for area: 270 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 4, 7, 8 For all tops   Highest summit: Donald's Hill, 399m
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Binevenagh Hill Binn Fhoibhne A name in Irish
(Ir. Binn Fhoibhne [DUPN], 'peak of Foibhne') Derry County, in Binnion List, Olivine basalt lava Bedrock

Height: 385m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 4 Grid Reference: C69200 30200 This summit has been logged as climbed by 58 members. Recently by: DenisMc, sperrinlad, stevebullers, trostanite, Claybird007, Ulsterpooka, jmcg, susanc, jimmyread, windy, jlbrooke, davog, chalky, sir_boba_fett, Aidy
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.916383, Latitude: 55.114206 , Easting: 269200, Northing: 430200 Prominence: 170m,   Isolation: 7.1km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 669134 930182,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Bnvngh, 10 char: Binevenagh
Bedrock type: Olivine basalt lava, (Upper Basalt Formation)

According to legend, Foibhne, son of Taircheltar, was slain here. Binevenagh is unmistakable with its impressive basalt cliffs, 1235 ft. high, and a lower series of broken crags resembling fangs.   Binevenagh is the third highest hill in the Keenaght area and the 985th highest in Ireland. Binevenagh is the most northerly summit in the Keenaght area.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/
COMMENTS for Binevenagh 1 2 3 Next page >>
Cliffs, woodland, a lake on top and magnificent views
Short Summary created by pdtempan,  6 May 2011
Binevenagh has an unmistakable profile, with its impressive line of basalt cliffs and a lower series of broken crags resembling fangs. There is a lake on the summit plateau. Binevenagh overlooks Magilligan Point, the NW tip of Co. Derry, and there are fine views of Lough Foyle and, beyond that, the hills of Inishowen in Co. Donegal. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/comment/5619/
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Binevenagh in area Keenaght, Ireland
Picture: The cliffs from below on the western edge.
Unorthodox Ramblings
by Aidy  15 Apr 2014
Walked almost every inch of this magnificent mountain today, albeit in a very unorthodox fashion. Initially I took the lazy way and parked beside the lough near the summit, then walked to the northeast edge of the cliffs. Walked in a generally southwest direction then, taking in the amazing views over Benone, Magilligan, Lough Foyle, Inishowen, the Roe Valley, and finally towards the Sperrins. All the while, I continually went as close as I dared to the edge of the cliff to see as much of them as I could from above. Having gone well to the south, I encountered a fence that took me east to the summit itself and the trig pillar. I then retraced my steps back to the car park, and drove round to a another car park in a forest just off the Aghanloo Road, not far south of its junction with the Seacoast Road. A long walk along the forest trail eventually took me out at the base of the cliffs on the west of the mountain. i walked south along the cliffs, ascending all the time, until I think I wasn't far off the point where earlier in the day I turned east from the cliffs to reach the summit, although I didn't go all the way up. Instead of going back north to regain the forest track, I thought I would cut directly west through the forest to the car park, which was a mistake. There was no trail at this end, and I took a zig-zagging route through dense trees, up and down steep forested slopes, tired and disorientated. Eventually, I did emerge close to where I wanted to be, although I'm not sure it saved me any time. Met a herd of goats at the southern edge of the cliffs too, but not sure if they were wild.

This mountain proves that height isn't everything, as the views are truly amazing from the top, particularly being blessed with a day like today. It is also equally attractive from below, the cliffs being very impressive from the west at the base. In fact, unusually, I ran out of space on my camera memory cards. Highly recommended whatever way you chose to approach it. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/comment/16009/
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thisbliss on Binevenagh, 2008
by thisbliss  22 Sep 2008
Planned my approach using route described on BBC show blueprint : http://www.bbc.co.uk/blueprint/offthebeatentrack/binevenagh.shtml. Started off at St Aidans church and well (C678315 A) From the well go right and up steps at the corner of the graveyard, where the forest path starts. This was a nice walk with shafts of sun beaming in through the trees. Mountain bikers had been at work with loads of ramps and stuff on display throughout the forest path. After a 15 min walk the forest opens out to the large grassy embankment underneath the impressive cliffs. This is quite steep and takes a bit of effort getting up to the crags below the cliff. Veered off from the blueprint route at this point. Found a narrow gulley between two cliffs which looked passable. Had to take er canny as the steep ground was covered with loose debris. Luckily there was enough grass and rock, hand and foot holds to eventually clamber onto the large grassy Binevenagh top. Came up opposite the lake which had a few people fishing at it, obviously must be stocked. A glider was circling round the whole time I was on the summit. Dandered south along the cliff edge and then east to the cairn summit with trig pillar. Glad Binevenagh is now on MV, for 385m the view is good value per metre, particularly down to the magilligan foreshore, inishowen, sperrins and antrim hills. Retraced my steps and then followed the blueprint track back down. This took me to the end of the cliff run, into binevenagh forest (C697317 B). The path then drops quite steeply downwards in a NW direction. Coming to a forest track I turned left and walked back underneath the towering cliffs. This track runs out after a while but picked up on another one lower down which took me almost back to the point where i had emerged from the lower forest. Then back to the church, completing the route in a good 2 hours. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/comment/3333/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Binevenagh in area Keenaght, Ireland
Picture: Billy no mates
Derry259 on Binevenagh, 2010
by Derry259  9 Jan 2010
On new years eve decided to finish the year by doing Binevenagh.Four of us set of from a very icy St.Aidans carpark up through the forest,upon reaching the stile at forest edge we turned right and passed the Mass Rock on our way to the shoulder which lead to the summit. Knee deep snow in places made the going quite tough,especially for Vinny who was climbing his first hill.... (or as he said "ive climbed two hills today .....my first and last") Because of the snow we took a gradual meandering route upwards,following a gully which zig zagged toward the summit...On reaching the top we took advantage of the picnic tables at a frozen Binevenagh lake to have our lunch.(Brendan enjoyed his more than usual after making his older???? brother Anthony carry all in one rucksack) After spending some time taking in the stunning views including The Sperrins,Antrim Hills,Hills of Donegal and the winding river Roe , we descended through the forest mentioned in previous review and back to the car.....A good way to finish the year apart from myself and Anthony landing on our backsides as we left the graveyard at St Aidans.......... Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/comment/4351/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Binevenagh in area Keenaght, Ireland
Picture: Group at Bellarena Station after the climb
Friendship Club
by pdtempan  15 May 2011
On Sunday 1st May a group from the Belfast Friendship Club took the train to Bellarena and climbed Binevenagh. There were 10 of us, and 7 nationalities represented: Hungarian (X3), Indian (X2), Spanish, Czech, Rumanian, German and English. The weather was perfect and we were able to picnic on the cliff-top. We had only a little time to explore one of the fangs on the way down, but we saw some lovely purple orchids there. As the train was delayed by half an hour on the outward journey, we ended up running the last 20 mins to make sure of catching the train. Next trip: Cave Hill! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/comment/6342/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Binevenagh in area Keenaght, Ireland
Picture: The final stretch to the summit
An easy option on Foyleside
by Peter Walker  20 Jun 2011
For the chronically lazy who lack the moral fibre to climb Binevenagh from its foot (in my defence it had been a couple of days of minimal sleep and maximal sore throat) it can be climbed in a more perfunctory fashion by turning off the road across the mountain's NE slopes at (705 314 C) then driving up to the car park by the shore of Binevenagh Lake (691 307 D). From here bear round the NW end of the lake (the right as you look) on obvious trods. Keep to the right of a conspicuous hummock, and maintain roughly the same direction (with a very slight descent) to reach a fence, which can be followed up to the skyline and summit with its pillar; this route should keep you on paths all the way (shortcuts cost more energy).

With the top gained, it would be criminal not to explore the main attractions of this dramatic little peak on the return, and hanging a little left after the initial drop down by the fence will take you to the edge of the escarpment...a less berserk version of the Quiraing on the Isle of Skye. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/860/comment/6378/
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(End of comment section for Binevenagh.)

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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here