Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any mountain area or any detail feature.
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill or mountain

Users Online:
Guests online: 50
Recent Contributions

Torc Mountain W Top: Big brother ....

Barnahowna: Fine-weather photo

Maumtrasna North-East Top: Worth a visit!

Ott Mountain to Slieve Meelmore

Crossderry: Summit No 2 of a fine ridge walk.

Glenbeigh to Galway's Bridge

Mothaillín: Fabulous views to the west from the summit.

Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10

Peak bagging in The Sperrins in autumn

Mothaillín: Summit area as seen from Crossderry.

Crossderry: Towards Knocknabreeda and Stumoa Dúloigh

Slieve Foye

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
General information about the site is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks or shared GPS tracks may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk see conditions.
Credits and list definitions are listed here Credits
Video display
Rating graphic.
Slieve Bearnagh Mountain Sliabh Bearnach A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh Bearnach [PNNI], 'gapped mountain') Down County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Granite granophyre Bedrock

Height: 739m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J31316 28034 This summit has been logged as climbed by 589 members. Recently by: GillSte, IainT, Lauranna, Bunsen7, Kiwitrekker, 21yearsgone, daithileonard, johncromie, daftgrandad, clacon, DelStewart, Treeman, ericjones, lw24, thomas_g
I have climbed this summit: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -5.988843, Latitude: 54.184159 , Easting: 331316, Northing: 328034 Prominence: 304m,   Isolation: 0.4km
ITM: 731268 828003,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvBrn, 10 char: SlvBrngh
Bedrock type: Granite granophyre, (Mourne Mountains granite)

One of the most recognisible peaks of Mourne and perhaps the only one that necessitates removing hands from pockets. Slieve Bernagh gets its name from the two rocky granite tors which crown the summit and the gap or saddle betweeen them.   Slieve Bearnagh is the 85th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/
COMMENTS for Slieve Bearnagh 1 2 3 .. 7 Next page >>
A Monarch of the Mournes .. by group   (Show all for Slieve Bearnagh)
Mourne 7 .. by hbowman1   (Show all for Slieve Bearnagh)
gingerbus on Slieve Bearnagh, 2010
by gingerbus  4 Mar 2010
So Sherpa Paul finally decides - "I'll come over to you". An inner voice thanked the mountain gods. I had gone from step-fast, shot past crag-fast and at this stage had become indisputably mountain-fast. We agreed that it was too dangerous to proceed upwards, and once we'd made a definite decision to descend, my mood lifted. I dug my heels into the snow, one tentative footstep after the other, zig-zagging down the side of Bearnagh. Sherpa Paul led the way whilst I followed, cautiously. We eventually made it down, avoiding the steps on the final leg by veering towards the gentler incline to the south-east.

Glad to be finally down at the gap, we spotted a group of lads preparing to embark, one of them happy out in his shorts in the sub-zero air. We stood there watching as they proceeded to swiftly ascend The Steps and mill up over the edge of the plateau and upwards out of sight. The Sherpa and I looked at each other for a moment, wished them better luck than we'd had, then silently headed back down from whence we came.

Trudging down along the Trassey, the snow slowly beginning to recede in the afternoon sun, the banter ranged from a considered analysis of the conditions we'd encountered up top, the shoulda-woulda-couldas of our decision to descend, to some light-hearted jeering from the Sherpa regarding my mist-fear. I was now in the lead and enjoying my reclaimed joie de vivre, when we suddenly came upon a group of young people being lead by an adult. Being the gentleman I am, I of course sidled over out of the way of this youthful group (my joyous impetus was too great to simply come to a halt) onto what I thought was a snow-free piece of heather. Now, there was a good reason that piece of ground wasn't covered in snow. I stumbled shin deep into the muddy water, the shock of which propelled me onwards and inwards. It's hard to maintain decorum when scrambling about in a muddy stream with a line of shocked teenagers frozen in surprise and gawking at you, but I did manage to stumble back to the track just at the end of the line, after spewing forth a few irreverent utterances, to which the guide could only counter an "Oh dear....". Quick as I could, I settled back into some sort of dignified stride as if it had never happened, only to have the Sherpa arrive beside me and proceed to crease himself up with laughter. "We'll stop here to take a break" the guide was heard to say, although whether that was to instruct his charges on a prime example of what *not* to do when mountain climbing, or to give himself a chance to recover from a fit of hysterics is hard to know. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/4466/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
You fall down a manhole: a bad day. You awake to .. by Bleck Cra   (Show all for Slieve Bearnagh)
I did a horseshoe walk in the Mournes last week, .. by sbender   (Show all for Slieve Bearnagh)
Having tackled the North Tor from Hare's Gap, the .. by csd   (Show all for Slieve Bearnagh)
COMMENTS for Slieve Bearnagh 1 2 3 .. 7 Next page >>
(End of comment section for Slieve Bearnagh.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here