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Slieve Bearnagh Mountain Sliabh Bearnach A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh Bearnach [PNNI], 'gapped mountain') Down County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Granite granophyre Bedrock

Height: 739m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J31316 28034 This summit has been logged as climbed by 594 members. Recently by: rodman, Helenha, maike, oldpragmatist, Sweeney, GillSte, IainT, Lauranna, Bunsen7, Kiwitrekker, 21yearsgone, daithileonard, johncromie, daftgrandad, clacon
I have climbed this summit: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -5.989317, Latitude: 54.184491 , Easting: 331316, Northing: 328034 Prominence: 304m,   Isolation: 0.4km
ITM: 731236 828039,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvBrn, 10 char: SlvBrngh
Bedrock type: Granite granophyre, (Mourne Mountains granite)

One of the most recognisible peaks of Mourne and perhaps the only one that necessitates removing hands from pockets. Slieve Bernagh gets its name from the two rocky granite tors which crown the summit and the gap or saddle betweeen them.   Slieve Bearnagh is the 85th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/
COMMENTS for Slieve Bearnagh 1 2 3 .. 7 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Bearnagh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Slieve Bearnagh, main summit on left
 
A Monarch of the Mournes
Short Summary created by wicklore,  2 May 2011
Slieve Bearnagh is one of the most dramatic of the Mourne Mountains, and it is topped by a huge tor that must be climbed if one is a purist. Otherwise reaching the wider summit area of short grass and breathtaking views is more than enough for most regular walkers.

One approach is to start at Meelmore Lodge at J305 308 A. (Secure parking but at a cost of a couple of pounds), or at a nearby free car park at J311 313 B. From either place follow tracks out onto the open bog to meet the Trassey Track at J312 305 C. Follow the Trassey Track up to the Hare’s Gap at J323 288 D. Turn right and follow the very steep slope up to reach Slieve Bearnagh North Tor. Follow the track for another few hundred metres to climb up to the main summit of Slieve Bearnagh. Whether approaching from the north or south, the ground is very steep but if the Mourne wall can do it so can you! If descending to the south keep to the left of the Mourne Wall to avoid some mini cliffs above the col with Slieve Meelmore. From Meelmore Lodge Bearnagh can be reached in about two hours, although the steep slopes may slow you down. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/4843/
 
Mourne 7
by hbowman1  7 Aug 2011
I climbed this mountain yesterday as part of the Mourne 7'7's. Started in Donard car park at 7am and headed up toward the saddle between Donard and Commedagh. Leaving the rucksack at the Mourne wall, I tackled Donard first - always good to get the tallest out the way early on. Thereafter I retraced my steps and headed toward Commedagh; which despite being higher than Bernagh, I think is easier to climb. So, staying with the Mourne wall, I traversed over Slieve Corragh and Slievenaglogh and eventually came to the Hares Gap, to start the ascent of Bernagh. With the possible exceptions of Lamagan from Binnian/Lamagan colony and Donard from the Glen River, I think this is probably the hardest ascent of the entire walk. Clouds cleared at the summit to give decent views toward the Silent Valley and Lough Shannagh. Upon summiting Bernagh, I descended toward Pollaphuca, to begin the ascent of Meelmore. Meelmore is probably the easiest summit of the seven. Thereafter, I headed toward Meelbeg. Thick clouds had settled in by this stage to limit visibility to a few metres. Thankfully, upon descending Meelbeg, the clouds cleared to afford decent visibility toward Binnian, Lamagan, Ben Crom and Doan. The traverse between Meelbeg to the half way point of Ben Crom Dam is probably the most difficult terrain to walk upon of the entire walk. This is because there is no clear path and much of terrain is damp and marshy. Upon reaching the dam, the highlight of the walk appeared - Ben Crom mountain was reflected in the waters beneath the reservoir. Upon reaching the colony I commenced what I think the probably the most scenic part of the walk - the back castles of Binnian. Clear skies afforded views toward Slieve Foye on the Carlingford Hills. Upon reaching the South Tor, I retraced my steps toward the colony to begin the ascent of Lamagan. This marks the final ascent of the entire walk. The point at which the crest gives way to the summit affords nice views towards Donard/Commedagh/Beg/Cove. Upon summiting Lamagan, the real challenge of the walk begins. It may be tempting to think that with all mountains climbed the remainder of the walk is easy. This is not the case. The traverse over Cove, Beg, followed by the Brandy pad past the castles of Commedagh toward the saddle is probably the most difficult part of the walk. This is when fatigue and tiredness set in. Upon reaching the saddle simply follow the Glen river path toward Donard car park which marks the finish. This route took me 10 hours 47 minutes. The route I took last year - Donard, Commedagh, Lamagan, Binnian, Meelbeg, Meelmore, Bernagh - took me 12 hours 17 minutes. The difference in time is the valley between Doan and Ben Crom. Going from Meelbeg to Ben Crom dam means you are going in the same direction of the river. Going from the dam to Meelbeg means you are going against the river. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/6468/
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gingerbus on Slieve Bearnagh, 2010
by gingerbus  4 Mar 2010
So Sherpa Paul finally decides - "I'll come over to you". An inner voice thanked the mountain gods. I had gone from step-fast, shot past crag-fast and at this stage had become indisputably mountain-fast. We agreed that it was too dangerous to proceed upwards, and once we'd made a definite decision to descend, my mood lifted. I dug my heels into the snow, one tentative footstep after the other, zig-zagging down the side of Bearnagh. Sherpa Paul led the way whilst I followed, cautiously. We eventually made it down, avoiding the steps on the final leg by veering towards the gentler incline to the south-east.

Glad to be finally down at the gap, we spotted a group of lads preparing to embark, one of them happy out in his shorts in the sub-zero air. We stood there watching as they proceeded to swiftly ascend The Steps and mill up over the edge of the plateau and upwards out of sight. The Sherpa and I looked at each other for a moment, wished them better luck than we'd had, then silently headed back down from whence we came.

Trudging down along the Trassey, the snow slowly beginning to recede in the afternoon sun, the banter ranged from a considered analysis of the conditions we'd encountered up top, the shoulda-woulda-couldas of our decision to descend, to some light-hearted jeering from the Sherpa regarding my mist-fear. I was now in the lead and enjoying my reclaimed joie de vivre, when we suddenly came upon a group of young people being lead by an adult. Being the gentleman I am, I of course sidled over out of the way of this youthful group (my joyous impetus was too great to simply come to a halt) onto what I thought was a snow-free piece of heather. Now, there was a good reason that piece of ground wasn't covered in snow. I stumbled shin deep into the muddy water, the shock of which propelled me onwards and inwards. It's hard to maintain decorum when scrambling about in a muddy stream with a line of shocked teenagers frozen in surprise and gawking at you, but I did manage to stumble back to the track just at the end of the line, after spewing forth a few irreverent utterances, to which the guide could only counter an "Oh dear....". Quick as I could, I settled back into some sort of dignified stride as if it had never happened, only to have the Sherpa arrive beside me and proceed to crease himself up with laughter. "We'll stop here to take a break" the guide was heard to say, although whether that was to instruct his charges on a prime example of what *not* to do when mountain climbing, or to give himself a chance to recover from a fit of hysterics is hard to know. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/4466/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Bearnagh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Bearnagh and a coggly rock
Bleck Cra on Slieve Bearnagh, 2009
by Bleck Cra  19 Oct 2009
You fall down a manhole: a bad day. You awake to a broken heart: another bad day. Your children are eaten by alligators: also a bad day. So when polemicists assert that there are no bad days it is clear they have never drawn their own blood. Slieve Bearnagh, Diva of the Mourne Mountains is flame to the moth that was, at least last Saturday, a mountain dragnet performed by squillions of be-woggled pubescents. Led by fat sweaty men and bounding healthy women, they poured into every one of Bearnagh's mountain tracks like the Blackwater up rabbit holes. A bad day is also one that starts with the zip coming off your jacket, your boots left at home and the torpor of a damp Ulster morning; the kind with the trick rain that doesnt fall but soaks you to your soul. Bearnagh breaks the rolling Mournes skyline with 2 ragged tors; and the silence of the Trassey valley with a siren call to action. Her northern flank is cracked and torn by a thousand feet over more gravel than granite; her southern is worse and with little stupidity you can ski down it to your demise. Out of every corner they came like Gengis shagging Khan. And so every route-off-route had to be devised, to avoid being deafened, flattened and trodden on. So deny yourself Trassey or the Pad and approach her from Corragh; juke round the Poluphuca to the col twixt More and herself; shin up the first 5 mins right of the wall and slabs and then go left of them and hold that left unto the summit and down. The sky became sun, the din became song and the damp became diamonds. OK, so bad days ..? Toggly go boggly go woggly. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/4216/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Bearnagh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: The Mournes in all their splendor
 
sbender on Slieve Bearnagh, 2008
by sbender  30 Oct 2008
I did a horseshoe walk in the Mournes last week, but wasn't sure at first under which mountain I would write about my experience. finally decided on Slieve Bearnagh for the simple reason that it was a tough nut to crack. I started at 9.00 after parking at the Crocknafeola Wood, and 'entered' into Mournes area at point J276226 E up Slieve Muck. It was a hard start, especially with 15kg on your back (I had the bright idea to camp out one night). After that onto Carr Mountain, via Slieve Loughshannagh and Slieve Meelbeg to Slieve Meelmore following the wall. after a steep descent, you guessed it........ Slieve Bearnagh. I thought my legs were going to turn to jelly. Could not climb the Tor as at this stage there was blowing a galeforce wind and I was on my own. Had a bit of lunch on the other side of this mountain. Unfortunately the weather started to deteriorate at this point, sleet and hail, interspersed with some rain at galeforce speed (the word sand blasting sprung to mind). After that simply following the wall, Slievenaglogh, SlieveCorragh, Slieve Commedagh, and finally Slieve Donard. After descending I had wanted to climb Chimney Rock Mountain, but it was already 17.15. I would have to do my final descent in the dark, so decided against that. I followed the wall for another bit untill point J353262 F and descended just north-west of Rocky Mountain, keeping the Hares Castle (the hares were not home) to the right. Do not....I repeat, do not use this route. It was a total disaster. Very overgrown uneaven and bouldery (hidden) flank of this mountain. I must have fallen over about a dozen times (no joke). Finally reached the Annalong Valley at 18.30. In time to pitch my tent before dark at point J342243 G at the weir and cook some pasta out of a bag (Which tasted like honey at this stage). Next day great weather, I looked up at Slieve Binnian but my legs were protesting in such a way that I had to leave that for another holiday. Ended up with a 13km road walk instead. I stayed in Newcastle in the Avoca Hotel which has nice sea front rooms. If you decide to do the Mournes, Have dinner in Villa Vinci, you'll be well looked afgter by Bennie, the owner, and the food is fantastic, just what you need after a long walk. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/3408/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Bearnagh in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: The sun setting behind Slieve Bearnagh, viewed from the North Tor.
csd on Slieve Bearnagh, 2006
by csd  8 Jan 2006
Having tackled the North Tor from Hare's Gap, the route up to the main summit is simplicity itself: just follow the wall. I was fortunate to catch the sun just as it was setting behind the summit tors, as viewed from the North Tor summit. Return to the Trassey Track was achieved by heading west down to the col with Slieve Meelmore. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/83/comment/2130/
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