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Dublin/Wicklow Area   Dublin Mountains Subarea
Maximum height for area: 925 metres,   Summits in area: 111,   Maximum prominence for area: 905 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 28B, 49, 50, 55, 56, 61, 62, Extent1 For all tops   Highest summit: Lugnaquilla, 925m

Summits in area Dublin/Wicklow:
Ballinacorbeg 336mBallinastraw 284mBallycurry 301mBallyguile Hill 188mBallyhook Hill 288mBray Head Hill 240mCarrickgollogan 276mCarrigeen Hill 298mCarrigoona Commons 242mCloghnagaune 385mCorballis Hill 258mCupidstown Hill 379mDunranhill 342mEagle Hill 296mKilleagh 249mKilliney Hill 153mKilmichael Hill 267mKilnamanagh Hill 217mKnockannavea 396mKnockree 342mMount Kennedy 366mSlieveroe 332mWestaston Hill 270m
Dublin Mountains:   Corrig Mountain 617.1mGlendoo Mountain 586mKippure 757mKnocknagun 555mPrince William's Seat 555mSaggart Hill 395mSeahan 647.3mSeefin 620.6mSeefingan 722.9mTibradden Mountain 467mTwo Rock Mountain 536m
Wicklow Mountains:   Annagh Hill 454mBallinacor Mountain 531mBallinafunshoge 480mBallineddan Mountain 652mBallycumber Hill 431mBallycurragh Hill 536mBallyteige 447mBaltinglass Hill 382mBarranisky 280mBenleagh 689mBlack Hill 602.2mBrockagh Mountain 557mBrockagh Mountain SE Top 470mCamaderry Mountain 698mCamenabologue 758mCamenabologue SE Top 663mCarrick Mountain 381mCarrickashane Mountain 508mCarrigleitrim 408mCarriglineen Mountain 455mCarrigshouk 572.5mCarrigvore 682mChurch Mountain 544mCloghernagh 800mCollon Hill 238mConavalla 734mCorriebracks 531mCorrigasleggaun 794mCroaghanmoira 664mCroghan Kinsella 606mCushbawn 400mDerrybawn Mountain 474mDjouce 725mDuff Hill 720mFananierin 426mGravale 718mGreat Sugar Loaf 501mKeadeen Mountain 653mKirikee Mountain 474mKnocknacloghoge 534mLakeen 357mLittle Sugar Loaf 342mLobawn 636mLugduff 652mLugduff SE Top 637mLuggala 595mLugnagun 446mLugnaquilla 925mMaulin 570mMoanbane 703mMoneyteige North 427mMullacor 657mMullaghcleevaun 849mMullaghcleevaun East Top 790mMuskeagh Hill 397mPreban Hill 389mScarr 641mSeskin 344mSilsean 698mSleamaine 430mSlieve Maan 547.8mSlievecorragh 418mSlievefoore 414mSlievemaan 759mSorrel Hill 599.5mSpinans Hill 409mSpinans Hill SE Top 400mStoney Top 714mStookeen 420mTable Mountain 701.7mTinoran Hill 312mTomaneena 681mTonduff 642mTonelagee 817mTonelagee NE Top 668mTrooperstown Hill 430mWar Hill 686m
Rating graphic.
Kippure Mountain Cipiúr A name in Irish
(Ir. Cipiúr [OSI], origin obscure) County Highpoint of Dublin, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists

Height: 757m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 56 Grid Reference: O11582 15455 This summit has been logged as climbed by 663 members. Recently by: TipsyDempy, debs27, msammon, jillsteer, Bagger_Plz, Hilldweller, marcw, SenanFoley, edgard13, chalky, cmcgov, killyman1, geohappy, gringottsgoblin, grzywaczmarcin
I have climbed this summit: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.331884, Latitude: 53.178139 , Easting: 311582, Northing: 215455 Prominence: 262m,   Isolation: 3.3km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 711506 715485,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Kipure, 10 char: Kippure

The River Liffey rises high on the slopes of Kippure. The name as shown on Discovery map is simply a transliteration of a pronunciation collected locally, but without any clear meaning. It resembles ciop, 'stump' and iúr, 'yew', but 'stump of yew' would be Ciop Iúir. Yew is unlikely to have ever grown near such a high exposed summit, but the name also refers to a townland which descends to the valley, so a connection with yew is not impossible.   Kippure is the 72nd highest summit in Ireland. Kippure is the highest point in county Dublin.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/
COMMENTS for Kippure 1 2 3 .. 5 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Kippure in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Kippure from the NW - From right on skyline Djouce, War Hill
 
All points of the Compass
Short Summary created by simon3, wicklore  1 Jun 2011
Kippure is the highest and most southerly summit in Dublin. It is crowned by a 110 metre high transmitter, and is approachable from all points of the compass. It can be walked on its own or as a route combining several other local summits. Most routes involve heavy, open bog, while one approach makes use of a gated access road. The summit is urbanised and ugly, but the views on a good day are expansive in all directions, taking in Dublin, Bray, the Irish Sea and many of the Wicklow hills all around.

North, an approach through Glenasmole is possible from O109 199 A, or from a bog track at O131 198 B. East, the adventurous can start at the cottage at Lough Bray Lower at O142 164 C and head up the steep ground between the two lakes. Otherwise park at O143 153 D and follow a track that skirts the corrie walls. The gated access road at O141 142 E is the most popular with the Sunday stroller.
South, typical approaches are from O137 137 F, or from O080145 G, both of which cross heavy bog on the way up. West, start at O063 169 H and take in Seefin and Seefingan en route. North West, start at O073200 I and take in Seahan, Corrig and Seefingan en route.

Caution is needed if approaching from Seahan or Seefin to the west as these routes partly follow the boundary of the Kilbride Army Rifle Range. The approach from Glenasmole to the north is the quietest, and offers secret babbling brooks, mini cataracts and river cliffs, wild goats and plenty of peace. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/comment/4833/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Kippure in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Long hike up the access road
Great views after the boring road
by tmsr  4 Jun 2012
Great 360 degree views from the summit, but if I was to go again, think I'd avoid the boring access road from Military Road and choose an alternative access. Highlight for kids was seeing the Liffey as a jumpable river, and the geocaching find at the summit Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/comment/6843/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Kippure in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
 
padodes on Kippure, 2009
by padodes  15 Jan 2009
The broad shoulder of Kippure that slopes down to the east drops precipitously into the twin corries of Lough Bray Upper and Lough Bray Lower, separated by the blunt wedge of the Eagle’s Crag (see photo). The walk around the rim, above the brooding lakes, has plenty to grip the attention, but there’s also a literary association that gives added interest to any walker’s visit to this area of rugged beauty.

On 28 June 1907, John Millington Synge, himself an inveterate walker, began a happy two-week stay in the roadside gate lodge, then known as McGuirk’s Cottage, at the entrance to Lough Bray House (that nestles, out of sight, on the northern shore of the lower lake). He found peace here after the furore that had surrounded the staging of "The Playboy of the Western World" at the beginning of the year. He noted down his impressions in a travelogue, "Glencree", that would later be published in the collection "In Wicklow and West Kerry". In phrase after phrase he evokes exactly the same experience that is ours today. Just a sample: “I have come out again on the mountain road the third day of the fog. At first it was misty only, and then a cloud crept up the water gullies from the valley of the Liffey, and in a moment I am cut off in a white silent cloud. The little turfy ridges on each side of the road have the look of glens to me, and every block of stone has the size of a house. The cobwebs on the furze are like a silvery net and the silence is so great and queer… Then, as I walk on, I see out over a cloud to the tops of real mountains standing up into the sky.”

I don’t know if Synge wrote his poem "To the Oaks of Glencree" during his visit in 1907, but, with its melancholy premonition of death, I would like to think so. He was already suffering from the cancer that would claim his young life only two years later. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/comment/3526/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Kippure in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Highest man in Dublin!!
Kippure Hike
by Dessie1  31 May 2010
Hiked up Kippure on 21-5-10.Parked in the car park at the small bridge (O1094912774 J) just where the R759 road passes over a small stream.Hike length to top was 2.7Km.Took a 14 deg true bearing all the way to top.
Route was quite marshy most of the way but not too bad. Met 2 deer on route which was a surprise.Didnt have time to even get the camera turned on!Reached the summit after about an hours hike.Excellent views of the 2 sugarloaf's peeping through Tonduff and War Hill to the east and Carrigvore,Gravale,Duff and mulls to the southwest.Had celebratory cup of tea on summit while watching a guy hang from the mast near the top repairing something.Retraced steps back down to car.Enjoyable couple of hours and well worth a go if you fancy something a bit more challenging than the road route. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/comment/5824/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Kippure in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: The deer aren't as interested in me as I am in them.
 
SDillmore on Kippure, 2005
by SDillmore  12 Jul 2005
Took the meandering access road up. After having done Lug earlier in the day I was too tired for the direct ascent (the 28 degree temperature all day didn't help either). Near sunset on the way down, I almost missed two large herds of deer. I caught the first group looking back, glimpsing their silhouette. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/comment/1796/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Kippure in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Lough Bray Upper and Eagles' Crag
padodes on Kippure, 2009
by padodes  21 Jan 2009
I would like to add a few details to Wicklore’s comment on walking around Lough Bray (Upper and Lower), which may add to the interest of exploring this area. The massive outcrop between the two corries is known as the Eagles’ Crag (although the name does not appear in the OSI map). It is recorded that eagles did, in fact, breed here into the 19th century, when they were finally hunted to extermination. It still isn’t unusual to see a peregrine falcon or kestrel rising on the thermals created by the corries, but you are just as likely to see today colourful paragliders doing the same when the weather is favourable. The corries themselves were formed during the last Ice Age and marked the head of a glacier that flowed down the length of Glencree Valley, with, I would surmise, minor tributaries coming from Raven’s Rock glen (east of Lugduff) and the little glen at Powerscourt Waterfall, each of which has its own modest cirque. The lakes that formed behind the moraines are quite deep and do not seem to communicate above ground, which has led to speculation that they may nonetheless be connected underground, with a flow from the Upper to the Lower. The water is acidic and low in nutrients, so aquatic life is rather poor and you will see that waterfowl are infrequent visitors. I read once that whooper swans have been known to descend here in winter, but I have never myself seen their white beauty on these black waters, despite many a visit. There is abundant plant life around the corries, I am assured, but the names that leave some botanising friends of mine ecstatic, like woodrush, cowberry and quillwort, are rather lost on me.

Parking close to the roadside cottage by Lough Bray Lower is very restricted, but this does not prevent, at weekends, a lot of cars from parking there anyway, and on both sides of the narrow road at that. It can be hard to get by, if you are travelling through. Add to that the madness of tour operators who have begun to send big coaches over the Military Road in recent years, and you have all the ingredients of a bottleneck worthy of the Red Cow Roundabout. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/73/comment/3536/
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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here