Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any mountain area or any detail feature.
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill or mountain
(none available)
Users Online:
Onzy, Hilldweller
Guests online: 71
Recent Contributions

Torc Mountain W Top: Big brother ....

Barnahowna: Fine-weather photo

Maumtrasna North-East Top: Worth a visit!

Ott Mountain to Slieve Meelmore

Crossderry: Summit No 2 of a fine ridge walk.

Glenbeigh to Galway's Bridge

Mothaillín: Fabulous views to the west from the summit.

Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10

Peak bagging in The Sperrins in autumn

Mothaillín: Summit area as seen from Crossderry.

Crossderry: Towards Knocknabreeda and Stumoa Dúloigh

Slieve Foye

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
General information about the site is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks or shared GPS tracks may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk see conditions.
Credits and list definitions are listed here Credits
Video display
Rating graphic.
Silvermine Mountains W Top Hill Sliabh an Airgid A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh an Airgid [logainm.ie], 'mountain of the silver') Tipperary County, in Carn List, Red conglomerate, sandstone & mudstone Bedrock

Height: 489m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 59 Grid Reference: R82072 69717 This summit has been logged as climbed by 70 members. Recently by: tagoona, melohara, ahogan, mountainmike, Michael-n, Maurice-N, jsramsey1491, delboyir, Cobhclimber, kakamaka17, Geo, millsd1, chalky, jasonmc, jlk
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -8.266532, Latitude: 52.77856 , Easting: 182072, Northing: 169717 Prominence: 214m,   Isolation: 1.2km
ITM: 582017 669759,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvrMn, 10 char: SlvrmnMntn
Bedrock type: Red conglomerate, sandstone & mudstone, (Old Red Sandstone (undifferentiated))

A mountain in this vicinity named Mullaghnedryny is mentioned in the Civil Survey of 1654-56 as part of the boundary of the barony of Owney and Arra. It may be this peak or a lower shoulder to the west. The name seems to represent Ir. Mullach na Droighní, 'summit of the blackthorn'.   Silvermine Mountains W Top is the 596th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/489/
COMMENTS for Silvermine Mountains W Top 1 of 1
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Silvermine Mountains W Top in area Shannon, Ireland
Picture: Looking west towards Silvermines Mtn W Top
Head west along the road
Short Summary created by simon3, jackill,  5 Aug 2013
Park in the Knockanroe carpark at R84440 69415 A (388 mtrs) walk into the forestry on a good roadway and take the second left along the crest of the hill. Pass the east summit before a short down/up section to gain the west summit. Excellent views of the whole Shannon region to be had from this easily accessed summit. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/5248/
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Silvermine Mountains W Top in area Shannon, Ireland
Picture: Sunset from the far end of the ridge with the Arra Mnts in the distance
Dig the View!
by mcrtchly  4 Sep 2010
Silvermines is the site of some of the longest worked mineral deposits in Ireland. The oldest records to mining here date to 1289 when miners from 'Italy' were working the veins. The mines were doubly important being a source of lead (used for roofing especially of the new monastries being built in the C13th) and of silver (for coinage). The working of the mines continued sparadically for the next 6oo years and saw extensive workings in the mid-C19th, the remains of which can be seen in the buildings at Silvermines and Shallee. These include three engine houses which would have contained Cornish beam engines for pumping, winding and crushing. The modern phase of mining began in the 1950's and culminated in the discovery of the massive stratiform lead-zinc-bartye deposit in the mid-1960's which was worked underground and on the surface until 1984. In recent years the legacy of this last phase of mining has been the toxic waste of the tips and tailings ponds.

A walk along the ridge of Silvermines Mountain gives a good overview of the mine workings at the foot of the mountain. Leaving Silvermines village and driving southwards on the minor road we pass the barren landscape of the C19th mine workings before heading steeply uphill. Begining our walk at the entrance to Knockanroe Woods (R 84478 69376 B ) there is a short detour to the east to bag the disappointing summit of Silvermines far east top. But the main focus of the walk is to head westwards uphill through the forest towards Silvermines East Top. The vista from the summit includes the tips from the C20th mine workings and the now flooded openpit of the Macobar bartye mine.

From the east summit the path now takes a roller coaster down and up steep (but thankfully short) slopes to reach Silvermines West Top. Again there are views of the mines from here but of special note is the main C20th tailings pond which can be seen to the NW on the floor of the plain below. This tailings pond was the source of lead rich dust blows about 10 years ago and now the waste has been stabilised with a new cover to stop the dust.

The ridge continues westwards from the West Top and an enticing summit can be seen about 1km away (R 80907 69437 C). At first this would appear to be a distinct summit which should be included in Mountain Views. However I measured the elevation difference between the col and the summit as only 10m. Thus the western most summit does not have enough prominence to count as a MV summit. Despite its shortcomings of not being a 'summit' we had fantastic views from here to the west across the River Shannon as far as the Arra Mountains and beyond, staying long enough to enjoy the sunset before heading back to the car.

The round trip from the car park at Knockanroe to the west end of the ridge is about 7km and took us 2.5hrs (including the short detour to Far East Summit). Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/6080/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Silvermine Mountains W Top in area Shannon, Ireland
Picture: 200th top!
200th Top
by paddyhillsbagger  8 May 2010
Silvermines Mtns W was the lucky 200th top for me! Climbed it on a gloriously sunny day after Moylussa circuit and Toutinna so was a little tired and sadly brought no champagne! Actually a lovely hill with splendid views all round. Starting point is Knocknaroe Forest Recreation Area R845 695 D and there are clear paths courtesy of Coillte. It's taken me over 3 yrs to get to this number having first started with Paddy Dillons book of 2'000ft tops and later branching out to county tops and local hills with MountainViews web site. It's been a very enjoyable journey so far and I'm only half way through the 2'000 footers as well as my local hills! Loads more still to do! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/4690/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Silvermine Mountains W Top in area Shannon, Ireland
Picture: A disused mine building west of Silvermines village
pdtempan on Silvermine Mountains W Top, 2009
by pdtempan  20 Mar 2009
Took this snap while passing through, on my way back to Belfast from Kerry. There are several old mine buildings and spoil heaps which are reminders of the mining activity which gave these hills their name. According to a plaque in Silvermines village, the first recorded exploitation of mineral wealth in this area was at the end of the 13th century, when Italian prospectors came from Genoa and Florence. As well as silver, lead and zinc was also mined here. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/489/comment/3653/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
(End of comment section for Silvermine Mountains W Top.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here