Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Overview
Detail
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any mountain area or any detail feature.
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill or mountain
Videos


Users Online:
PeakPaul, ewen, Elisabeth, majestic0110
Guests online: 106
Recent Contributions

Knockowen: October 2016

Cloghernagh: Picture

Robber's Pass Hill: Minor heathery lump. Overcivilised and underwhelming.

Cupidstown Hill: Enhance this with a visit to Oughterard

Route to Claggan NE Top

Near South Cork (Ireland)

Farbreague: from Arderin

Slievemore Circuit

Tonelagee: Fore!!!

Brandon Hill: Grand on Brandon!

Knockchree

Croaghmoyle: Easy walk up to great views

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
General information about the site is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks or shared GPS tracks may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk see conditions.
Credits and list definitions are listed here Credits
Video display
Rating graphic.
Knocklaur Mountain Cnoc Láir A name in Irish
(prob. Ir. Cnoc Láir [PDT], 'middle hill') Galway/ Mayo County, in Arderin, Irish Best Hundred Lists, Sandstone & conglomerate, ignimbrite Bedrock

Height: 518m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 38 Grid Reference: L93561 63112 This summit has been logged as climbed by 78 members. Recently by: Peter Walker, IainT, Lauranna, salford7, Garmin, DesHoulihan, patmoran, tphase, shaygo, markwallace, PeakPaul, maike, Ulsterpooka, mountainmike, simoburn
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.609229, Latitude: 53.607378 , Easting: 93561, Northing: 263112 Prominence: 43m,   Isolation: 1.9km
ITM: 493506 763152,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Kncklr, 10 char: Knocklaur
Bedrock type: Sandstone & conglomerate, ignimbrite, (Mweelrea Formation)

The name Knocklaur is marked about 1 km E of this peak on the Discovery map. As there is no summit at this point, it is not clear exactly which hill the name applies to.   Knocklaur is the 509th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/
COMMENTS for Knocklaur 1 2 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knocklaur in area Partry/Joyce Country, Ireland
Picture: Knocklaur (r) with Maumtrasna beyond
 
A dramatic location
Short Summary created by wicklore,  14 May 2011
Knocklaur is roughly the midpoint on the ridge connecting Maumtrasna and Devilsmother. This explains its name, Knocklaur, meaning ‘middle hill’. There is a steady bog sweeping up to the summit from the south, while to the north of the summit ridge the ground plummets away in sharp cliffs and extremely steep slopes. The views from Knocklaur are fantastic, especially across to the ridge containing Devilsmother and Devilsmother North Top to the west, and the vast bulk of Maumtrasna to the east. Knocklaur has a large spur that juts out north into the Glennacally valley, although the severity of the gradient on this spur would prevent access to Knocklaur this way for all but the most experienced summiteers.

It can be approached from the Devilsmother ridge by joining the Knocklaur ridge at L920 630 A. An easier alternative is to park at L936 611 B which is the end of a minor road at a little hamlet. A climb of 460 metres over 2 km can be made over a mixture of bog and grassland, with several fences and a few streams to negotiate. The trudge over bog gives way to the dramatic drops into the Glennacally Valley below as you reach the summit. Caution is required at the summit or on the ridge due to dangerous drops to the north. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/comment/5173/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knocklaur in area Partry/Joyce Country, Ireland
Picture: The ridge from Devilsmother to Maumtrasna, with Knocklaur in the middle
Best view of the Devil
by wicklore  30 Nov 2010
Knocklaur is roughly the midpoint on the ridge connecting Maumtrasna and Devilsmother. This explains its name, Knocklaur, meaning ‘middle hill’. The ridge itself has extremely steep drops along its northern side, while the southern side of the ridge is gentler. It is easy to keep well away from the steep northern drops as the ridge is quite broad. While Knocklaur can be climbed directly from the south, it is more likely to be climbed either from the Devilsmother ridge or from Maumtrasna. The views from Knocklaur are fantastic, especially across to the ridge containing Devilsmother and Devilsmother North Top to the west, and the vast bulk of Maumtrasna to the east. Knocklaur has a large spur that juts out into the Glennacally valley, although the severity of the gradient on this spur would prevent access to Knocklaur this way for all but the most experienced summiteers.

Those on a long walk can start from L935 655 C, where there is room to park a couple of cars beside a bridge. A local sheep farmer said access to the valley from here is permitted. From here cross the river and follow a fence into the valley for several hundred metres before heading directly up the steep wet slopes to gain the Devilsmother ridge. The ridge is wide and heathery, and can be followed to L920 630 where it connects to the ridge to Knocklaur and Maumtrasna. The final haul up to Knocklaur is quite steep, although a handy fence can provide support. If including the two Devilsmother tops first, Knocklaur can be reached in about three hours.

For a quicker ascent park at L936 611 which is the end of a minor road at a little hamlet. Although access is allowed through the farmland here, always ask first at any of the houses. From here it is a climb of 460 metres over 2 km distance to the summit of Knocklaur directly to the north. This route crosses a mixture of bog and grassland, with several fences and a few streams to negotiate. This approach would no doubt offer the greatest surprise as the trudge over bog gives way to the dramatic drops into Glennacally below as you reach the summit. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/comment/6171/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knocklaur in area Partry/Joyce Country, Ireland
Picture: Glennacally Valley of Maumtrasna
 
simon3 on Knocklaur, 2005
by simon3  7 May 2005
Knocklaur is an impressive spur pushing north into the Glennacally valley, or at least it is from the valley floor. Reaching it from ridge on the Maumtrasna side it's just a pull up of 40 or 50m.

Some words of caution. As so often in Ireland the north or northeasterly side of the mountain tends to be very steep. If you are trying to get off this summit to the north do not attempt the direct route down the north spur of Knocklaur -- it's very steep particularly at around elevation 250m. There is a col 540m to the West of the summit, but don't try to descend to the north there either, it' s even steeper. Your options are to descend at about L920629 D (see Route A on simulation) or follow the west ridge and climb onto Maghairlí an Deamhain north of it. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/comment/1683/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knocklaur in area Partry/Joyce Country, Ireland
First top on a Devilsmother Horseshoe
by fingalscave  27 Feb 2012
Mindful of Wicklore’s cautions of an ascent from the north and Simon3’s almost interdiction of a descent in this direction, I approached the northern spur of Knocklaur prepared if neccessary to walk around it’s base in order to find an ascent route, a line of attack so to speak.

I parked at L935 656 E, Glennacally Bridge. This is some 8km NW of Leenaun on the N59. Going through the gate directly south of the parking area, I followed the east bank of the Glennacally river. The first sections encountered here cut right through the rock forming some dramatic channels, not what you’d expect from the map. After about 1km, the river is joined by a branch from the left, the Glenfree. This was shallow when I was there and it was easy to cross. Knocklaur’s northern spur loomed large straight ahead as I continued heading south, following fairly close to the left bank of the river. After another 1km, I crossed the river just after a ridge on the opposite bank, a section of moraine perhaps? I could see an obvious green ramp heading diagonally up the incline from the left (east) side of Knocklaur’s northern spur and up to it’s central spine. The ramp starts around L93838 63581 F and ends on the spine at L93486 63545 G. This ramp is steep but is very do-able.

About halfway up the ramp I veered left, weaving through some rocky sections and going more directly up the slope, hands required. When I reached the spine, interested to see whether I should have stayed on my original course, I descended down towards the point where the ramp would have arrived. I didn’t go all the way down, but I don’t think there was any obstacle further down, so staying on the ramp would probably be an easier route up.

Once on the spine, it’s just a matter of some fairly easy scrambling up to Knocklaur summit.

The clouds hovered around the 500m mark, so while I could see down to the cols - the western one towards Devilsmother being a particularily steep descent - Devilsmother itself, the next peak on the route, remained hidden.

Also see Track 1267 Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/comment/6682/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
Approaches from the North and East
by Onzy  26 May 2014
Knocklaur can be approached from the North at Glennacally bridge (L93519 65641 H) where there is some parking on waste ground adjacent to a bungalow surrounded by trees. Permission can be sought at the bungalow and will probably be given readily. Knocklaur can be the first hill on a circuit to also include Devilsmother and its North top.

The route south to Knocklaur crosses two streams, the Glenncally and the Glenfree, both of which can become seriously difficult to cross after rain. I would recommend crossing these at the earliest possible opportunity or you may be condemned to wander upstream of both and away to the east of your route. In fact, if doing this route again, I would cross to the west of the Glenncally river at the bridge which would outflank the Glenfree.

Fingalscave notes a ramp beginning around L93838 63581 and ending on the spine at L93486 63545. This is likely to be the best approach from north or east. Due to detours made in order to get across the river, I missed this ramp and wound up well south of the approach to the ramp - instead I looked straight up at a wall of a hill which looked staggeringly steep. I did get up but at times it felt almost vertical and I had to climb grabbing handholds of mud. Any major slip and I felt would have slid down a vertical 150m before stopping. I would strongly recommend that, if approaching Knocklaur from this direction, that you find and use the ramp rather than any other ascent.

If doing the full circuit, it is worth noting that it is much safer done clockwise; descending north or east off Knocklaur is fraught with danger. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/comment/16074/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Knocklaur in area Partry/Joyce Country, Ireland
Picture: Cairn near Knocklaur
 
simon3 on Knocklaur, 2005
by simon3  7 May 2005
About 1100m SE of the summit of Knocklaur there is this substantial cairn (L94556 62574 I). The 1:50k map (and the Sheet 10 half inch) has the Knocklaur name nearer to this point than what our list calls Knocklaur. However the cairn marks nothing more than a bump with a prominence of only around 5m from the ridge so it is hard to see why it should be given the name. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/414/comment/1684/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
COMMENTS for Knocklaur 1 2 Next page >>
(End of comment section for Knocklaur.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here
MountainViews.ie Hill-walking Website for the island of Ireland. 11 Million Visitors Per Year. 1200 Contributors.